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April 24 2014

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We Sniff Out The World’s Most Expensive Perfume

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Designer-turned-perfumer Clive Christian became something of a household name—to fragrance aficionados, at least—in 2007, when he was awarded the Guinness World Record for creating No. 1, the most expensive fragrance ever made. Christian revived the nineteenth-century perfume house to which Queen Victoria awarded the image of her crown in 1872 and spared no expense when producing the famed eau. Only five limited-edition bottles were released for sale, and each was encased in a heavy Baccarat crystal flacon encrusted with a diamond solitaire and accessorized with 24-karat gold-plated sterling silver. (There is a more “affordable” perfume spray option that rings in at a mere $865.) Today, we finally had the chance to smell the “world’s most expensive perfume,” and we have this to say: It smelled…nice. No, we haven’t fully experienced its “growth period” yet—the fact that it’s comprised of pure, undiluted oils like rose, jasmine, ylang-ylang, and ancient Indian sandalwood means that it evolves very intricately on your skin—but, so far, it’s…nice. The experience, on the other hand, was indeed very grand, seeing as how we got to sniff No. 1 in the presence of the Duchess of York, who was holding court at Bergdorf Goodman this afternoon to promote The Young Victoria, a new flick out December 18 that she produced with Martin Scorsese. While we tried to stare-without-staring at Fergie, we learned that Christian apparently has more record-breaking on his mind. There was talk around the fragrance counter of a new addition to his nicher-than-niche line to debut in the coming year. Break out the black AmEx!

Photo: Courtesy of Clive Christian

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Comments

  1. NotMod says:

    Some nice things just can’t make good conversation, isn’t it…

    Example: if someone compliments your fragrance, would you tell them how much it costs, of all things?

    What to tell is another mater. You’d think that after the Turin lecture at TED, it would be easier to find the right words for likes and dislikes of scent in random company, but not quite / yet. Even the scent of roses seems to mean different things for everyone [except rose aficionados - in that sort of circle everyone seems to know how many ways a rose can smell, promise ya'! / or the wine folk - technicalities, technicalities...]

    Never mind naming the sensation, or the price tag. Just spell after me: S – E – R R – G …. etc., etc.