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April 20 2014

styledotcom Must be the night fever. stylem.ag/1ncyFYw

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Drenched, Again: Guido Palau Revisits Spring’s Shower Hair

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As previously noted on this blog, Guido Palau has a thing for reprising his own hair styles. And why not? As one of—if not the—leading styling experts in the backstage business, he has built up a library of looks, some of which deserve repeat appearances. (Others, admittedly, less so.) We’re on the fence about last season’s “just stepped out of the shower” hair, which Palau coined at Rag & Bone, sweeping drenched tresses into a messy updo before showcasing a similarly saturated, middle-parted, free-flowing look at Bottega Veneta. “Scuba hair” was how he described the equally soaked ponytails at Lanvin.

Sopping seemed to be the call of the day at Roberto Cavalli’s Fall show this weekend, where Palau was at it again, sculpting damp, separated strands using his tried-and-true bottle of Redken Hardwear 17 Super Strong Sculpting Gel slathered over wet strands. “It’s sexy hair that’s still sophisticated and feels easy but still has that classic Cavalli attitude,” Palau pointed out. Pat McGrath’s smoldering lids added to the sass on display, which she crafted using smudged out lines of CoverGirl’s Liquiline Blast in Black Fire with copper and gold metallic pigment added to the inner corners of the eyes for highlighted definition. “She’s very strong, confident” McGrath said of the Cavalli girl—and cannot be bothered to towel-dry, it would appear.

Photo: Luca Cannonieri / GoRunway.com

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  1. anniedearest says:

    I hate this look, it’s meant to be a new clean twist on “caught in the rain hair”. But with all the heavy make up there’s no way to expect a transition into sophisticated. It’s only ever going to read as “that girl didn’t come home last night”. Perhaps if they stripped the use of charcoals from the eye and applied it else where, perhaps to the cheek where there you could have even explored with some stencils for a establishing gradient toning in a water droplet pattern to highlight the cheek bones and counter balance the naked skin. Then add a range of matt lip tones ranging from wine to tangerine, to draw the eye in and than sew in the grey to the colour via some striking white under or on the brow in a heavy paint.