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July 29 2014

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Makeup Bag Must-Haves From Fashion’s Front Lines

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After reporting on consecutive seasons of backstage beauty, there are certain things that you start to notice in one makeup artist’s kit after the other—and we’re not just talking about an overabundance of eye shadow pots and lipstick tubes. Perhaps more interesting are the things that every face painter—no matter what brand they’re working with at any given show—simply must have in order to operate at full tilt. Once beauty editors get wind of these professional secrets (and subsequently blow up their collective spots), mainstream success stories tend to follow—just look at L’Oréal’s Elnett hair spray and Embryollise, the popular French pharmacy brand whose extra-emollient moisturizers were such a mega-hit backstage you can now find them readily no matter what country you call home.

With a week left of Fall shows, we’ve got two more tricks of the trade that are worth getting hip to post haste. First up is Homeoplasmine, another French drugstore staple that Tom Pecheux keeps at the ready whether traveling to New York, Milan, or Paris. “It’s a nipple cream,” he told us backstage at Doo.Ri, where he explained that Frenchwomen realized that the magical salve that heals dry, cracked skin irritated from nursing could work equally well on dry patches located elsewhere. “I use it on lips,” Lucia Pieroni told us this morning at Rochas, where she too had a tube lying amid her collection of Shiseido and Clé de Peau skincare products.

Pieroni reminded us of another makeup artist must-have that Val Garland revealed last season at Malandrino: Egyptian Magic. The all-natural, olive oil, royal jelly, honey, beeswax, and bee propolis cure-all can be found at your local Whole Foods and happens to be the more consumer-friendly way to get the glossy eyes we’ve been seeing on the runway of late. Slather a little onto bare lids or on top of a brown pigment for a dewy, glistening finish in lieu of heavier clear lip glosses. “That’s really just for shows,” Pieroni says of the sticky stuff—which may be best left to the professionals.

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