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Bottega Does Beauty—And Well

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The designer fragrance boom, is, well, booming. This Fall will see the release of new olfactory offerings from the likes of Marc Jacobs, Balenciaga, Fendi, Prada, and Bottega Veneta, which debuted its premiere scent last night at a cocktail party on the Upper East Side. “It’s based on the idea of leather, not the smell of leather,” Vice President of Marketing for Bottega Veneta Fragrances, Coty Prestige Thomas Lalague said of the floral chypre eau that features classically masculine notes like oak moss, benzoin, and Indian patchouli softened by more feminine hints of jasmine sambac and plum. “The trail is very feminine but I think it will appeal to men and women,” Lalague said, pointing out that its future success will be due to the committed involvement of the house’s creative director, Tomas Maier. “It was about an inspiration more than anything,” Maier said of his vision—an inspiration that stemmed specifically from the idea of a house in the Venetian countryside, with dark wood floors, leather bound books, and a warm breeze circulating the scent of wildflowers, cut grass, and hay. Maier, in turn, was eager to share credit with his perfuming partner, Robertet’s Michel Almairac. “A nose is something magic.”

When asked why the brand had decided to branch out into fragrance now, the designer replied that it was “the right time for the company. If there’s no image of a woman, there’s no need for a fragrance.” Having spent the last ten years building this image of “a woman who knows what she wants, is very confident and not about trends,” it seems that the need for a scent is now very real: BV fans like Jen Brill, Giovanna Battaglia, and Coco Brandolini all turned up to toast Maier. “Usually perfumes from big brands feel heavy. But this is the first one that’s not heavy, and that’s so important. And the bottle!” effused Brandolini of the rounded flacon with the house’s signature intrecciato woven leather pattern carved out on the bottom. “I never buy a fragrance if the bottle is bad and I love to have [this one] on my dresser.”

Photo: Billy Farrell/BFAnyc.com

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