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The Method Behind Luigi Murenu’s “Victorian Punk” Hair Madness At Givenchy

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There was plenty to lust over at Givenchy. That jacket in look fifteen immediately comes to mind, although we are still thinking about nearly every single aspect of the exceptional forty-eight-piece collection Riccardo Tisci showed for the house—including that hair. “[Riccardo] called me in Milan and said, ‘I want to have a test with you and only you’—it was a test of eight hours,” Luigi Murenu recalls of the process by which he and Tisci, with whom he has worked since the designer started at Givenchy eight years ago, decided on the closely cropped, colorful coifs models wore down the runway. “Usually [the hair] here is very organic. But [Riccardo] wanted to bring the show to another level,” says Murenu. “When I arrived at the studio, the first thing he did was play me all the tracks of Antony and the Johnsons, and he told me, ‘It will be extremely emotional, and I want you to bring something sensitive to the hair.’”

So Murenu obliged Tisci with twenty different ideas that were “masculine but extremely feminine—not androgynous,” and, at Tisci’s request, “looked like there were little roses in the head.” The result was a number of tightly wound pin curls that Murenu and his team saturated with Kiehl’s Clean Hold Styling Gel and applied to every girl, no matter her haircut, completely sans extensions. “We used the length of Saskia [de Brauw] to the length of Isabeli [Fontana]—everybody’s natural hair!” he reveals of the deliberately flat swirls that were meant to have a “Victorian punk” quality, even though there was something seemingly thirties about the almost retro bathing-cap silhouette—those neon faux dye jobs aside. “Originally, it was without color,” Murenu admits of what ultimately became temporary shocks of sky blue, dark blue, orange, fuchsia, red, black, purple, and a light pink that was a real crowd-pleaser. “The girls loved it,” he maintains, pointing out that Natalia Vodianova was quite taken with her bubblegum-tinged locks, which went surprisingly well with Pat McGrath’s glossy red-burgundy-stained eyes and clean skin. She certainly wasn’t the only one: catwalkers like Magdalena Frackowiak and Isabeli Fontana kept their hair totally intact to hit the post-show party circuit. “It was extremely special,” Murenu muses. “We wanted to represent the woman who wants to dream, the people who appreciate the poetry of fashion” (to which we say, thank you).

Photo: Michelle Morosi/ Gorunway.com

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