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April 20 2014

styledotcom Platinum blond? So predictable! stylem.ag/1l3QRnh

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The Cornrow Trend Grows in Sydney

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The reign of the cornrow continues in Australia, with these braids and dip-dyed ends showing up on the runway at Di$count (snapped by Style.com’s associate news editor, Katharine K. Zarrella). This plait seems to be seeking world domination for Fall 2014—staking its claim on the catwalk from New York to Sydney.

The Visor That Protects Your Part

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Dividing hair down the center was de rigueur for Spring 2014 (seen at Marni, Balenciaga, Valentino, and Chloé), and extreme side parts were on trend for Fall (showing up on the catwalk at Hugo Boss, Proenza Schouler, and Carven). But no matter whether you go deep or stick to the middle ground, keeping your scalp safeguarded this summer is key. Applying SPF to your strands, while effective, can leave them limp and greasy. Enter a stylish solution courtesy of the Teca por Helo Rocha show in São Paulo today: a visor with a strip designed to protect your part. Not only does this hat offer shade for your face, but it also shields the exposed skin on the top of your head when you’re soaking up the sun on the sand or the tennis court.

Photos: Getty Images

A Mohawk You Can Actually Wear

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Braids staked their claim on the runway this season, making appearances in every fashion city during the monthlong parade from New York to Paris. The plait that shows no signs of stopping, however, is the mohawk braid. It popped up at Tibi in NYC, on Brit Wacher’s catwalk in Toronto last week, and at the designers showcase today in Seoul. Far more tame than the hair-raising version adopted by the punks but so much edgier than a simple center part—getting caught in the middle never looked so good.

Photos: Getty

Flashback Beauty at Tokyo Fashion Week

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Lengths tucked into high collars, tonal hair and makeup, cornrows, and waist-grazing ponies—check, check, check, and check. The trends that dominated the runways in New York, London, Milan, and Paris made an appearance in Japan, proof that it really is a small world (at least when it comes to beauty). At Matohu and Beautiful People, turtlenecks and scarves served as the means to hide models’ long hair, much like they did at Prabal Gurung, Burberry Prorsum, and Anthony Vaccarello. The extreme tails spotted at Valentino and Chanel sashayed down the catwalks at Ujoy and Atsushi Nakashima. And from the front, the tops of models’ heads at Nakashima’s show were coated with gray paint (similar to the black powder Guido Palau employed at Alexander Wang) and lids dusted with a slate-colored shadow—both meant to coordinate with the clothes and produce a matchy-matchy effect (previously seen at Marc Jacobs). Even those Snoop Dogg-inspired braids devised by Duffy at Adam Selman made their way around the globe, arriving on the runway at Lamarck. One thing that did make an appearance in the buzzy city that didn’t get much attention in the other fashion capitals? Lips. If you dismiss Rihanna’s many wardrobe and lipstick changes, there was a lack of loud mouths for Fall 2014. Not the case today at KBF (below). This traffic-cone-colored pout is one beauty move we’ll be borrowing from the East.

KBF - Runway - MBFW Tokyo 2014 A/W

Photos: Getty

Conic Cornrows and Owl Eyes, Backstage at Alexander McQueen

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mcqueenLashes and cornrows—two of the trends we’ve seen time and again this season—were taken to breathtaking extremes backstage. One could say that pushing things to the max was a signature of the late Alexander McQueen: “This was something Alexander really liked—it feels like a classic code of the house,” said Guido Palau. The never-ending plait dreamed up by the mane master and executed by a team of braiders was no doubt “severe,” but the long, flowing extensions that caught the wind on the runway gave the “silhouette a certain softness.”

“It’s futurism mixed with nature,” Pat McGrath said of the two gasp-inducing looks she devised for the show. “We decided to do the owl world in a punk eye makeup way.” Black spiky feathers hand cut and designed by the face painter were painstakingly glued one by one onto the brows and top lashes. “When would I ever make it easy?” she quipped of the dramatic maquillage that took nearly four and a half hours to complete. Her second creation (worn by the majority of the models) played with shading and light in lieu of plumes—using brick red, silver, and gold metallic pigments to lend a “futuristic” feeling to the face. The end result not only incited a frenzy of flashes from photographers (particularly around the catwalkers with those phenomenal “mothlike” eyes), but also perfectly captured the “McQueen world of innocence, romance, and darkness” with a sensitivity and boldness that won’t soon be forgotten.

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde; Indigitalimages.com