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Kitchen Confidential: The Ultimate French Recipe for Shiny Hair

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josephine-cropThis column reveals the personal beauty recipes, homegrown remedies, and family concoctions that the industry’s trusted pros rely on for staying radiant.

From the Kitchen of: Olivia Chantecaille, founder of Chantecaille Beauté

“This is an old family recipe that my French grandmother passed down to my mom, who then shared it with me. I cherish it because it reminds me of them. But I like to put my own modern spin on it with a few additional pure ingredients. I do this treatment at the start of each new season, to help my hair adjust to the changing weather. It really works to make it stronger, shinier, and silkier. Plus, the rose water helps to balance out the pH of the hair and prevent breakage.”

One for the Recipe Box: Homemade Hair Treatment With Rose Water

1/4 cup of rose water
2 egg yolks
1/4 cup of rum
2 tablespoons of grape seed oil

“Beat the eggs thoroughly in a large bowl, add the rose water, rum, and oils. Mix the ingredients well. I apply the mask on towel-dried, not wet hair, which allows it to penetrate better. I start by massaging the mixture into the scalp and work my way down to the ends. Then I secure my hair in a chignon and let the mask soak in for thirty minutes. I finish by rinsing with cold water to seal the cuticle, eliminate frizz, and boost shine.”

Photo: Ivan Lattuda; Indigitalimages.com

Would You Wear Disco Makeup Down the Aisle?

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Disco and wedding aren’t two words that usually go together…unless, of course, you’re talking about jiving to the likes of Diana Ross and The Jackson 5 at the reception (undoubtedly with a great-uncle who hasn’t seen you since the diaper days and is being far too handsy for someone who’s family). But after hearing the soundtrack to Amsale’s Spring 2015 show, the seventies are where makeup artist Daniel Martin pulled his beauty inspiration. Pewter shadow and glitter gave models’ lids a Studio 54-worthy vibe, while metallic red lips came courtesy of Lipstick Queen lipstick in Red Metal. Any bride who wears this look is ready to jump aboard the love train and get down till dawn.

Photo: Courtesy of Lipstick Queen

In-House Experiment: We Try the Rainbow Hair Trend

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I rang in the recent vernal equinox in a couple of ways: The first involved taking out a favorite couple (cuffed jeans + loafers sans socks). The second hinged on getting myself some mermaid hair. For Davines’ latest hair color collection, Mother of Pearl, models’ hues were augmented by streaks that mimic the murky, rainbow iridescence found inside an oyster shell. With visions of ethereal tresses already filling my head, I turned to Greenpoint’s deeply cool Parlour Brooklyn salon and stylist Jill McArthur, a member of Davines’ Regional Artistic Team. After establishing a palette (shades of green, blue, and hints of pink to keep things from skewing too swampy) and placement (all over, with plenty of attention to the darker undersides of my hair), McArthur set about lightening a few sections of my already-blond locks. Then began the Flamboyage: In Davines’ exclusive take on freehand balayage, hair is applied to long, transparent adhesive strips before adding dye into the mix so that freshly painted color is never folded over onto itself. With the hand of a surgeon (and the patience of a saint), McArthur applied horizontal stripes of color to sections before ever-so-slightly blending their edges together with a flick of the wrist for a watercolor-like effect. One full evening, roughly forty Flamboyage strips, and several cups of the Parlour’s divine herbal tea later, my strands were an ethereal delight, confounding coworkers and L train commuters alike. And while the upkeep on any dye job requires a certain amount of vigilance (my new holy trinity is Davines’ Nounou Shampoo, Alchemic Conditioner Silver, and Oi/All in One Milk), it’s a small price to pay for the mermaid hair of the moment.

For more ways to try this season’s colorful trend and keep it looking fresh, see our Spring Beauty Guide.

The Secrets to Building a Coachella-Worthy Flower Crown

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There’s a fine line when it comes to the flower crown, a Coachella accessory staple, in that it can quickly tread into wedding territory. While we wouldn’t mind looking like the lost member of Kate Moss’ bridal party, finding a non-tacky wreath that is designed for festive weekends or a desert concert is harder than you’d think. Enter Crowns by Christy, a gem recently uncovered at the opening of the Annick Goutal boutique, where editors donned these springy creations. Founder Christy Meisner started crafting these flora hair accessories with blooms from her backyard and—in true beauty MacGyver form—dental floss. “It can work, but string doesn’t hold as well as wire,” she said. Alongside her best friend and crafting partner in crime, Audrey Plaisance, she’s expanded the project and is now taking personal orders through Instagram. (Honestly, half the reason people wear a flower crown in the first place is to share it on social media.) “We grew up sewing our outfits for school dances, learning to knit, and trying to make our own patterns out of newspaper,” she quipped. Here, Meisner shares her tricks of the trade:

Shop Right: “For fresh flowers, I shop everywhere from the Chelsea Flower District to Whole Foods to my local bodega—they have great fillers—and in the summertime, any backyard that is available at the moment.”

Embrace Filler: “Baby’s breath has a bad reputation, but when weaved into a flower crown, it’s total perfection.”

Ace Your Base: “Thin florist wire is the base of my crowns, real or faux. It allows you to bend anything into the shape you want.”

Act Fast: “Fresh flower crowns are like Cinderella: They only last until midnight, so you really have to make them and wear them on the same day.”

Fake It: “Faux flowers are a good alternative, but choosing the right ones are key. You want something pliable that you can easily insert wire through—anything with a plastic center is tough. For the tiny flowers, I usually opt for paper because they hold their shape, and for larger varieties I use silk.” Her favorite shops for premium picks: Jamali Floral & Garden Supplies and PANY Floral.

Following the Olfactory Spice Trail With Pauline Rochas

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mure-et-muscThe pro: Pauline Rochas, cocreator of Le Premier Parfum by Coolife

The product: “I was a young teenager in Paris when I first discovered Mûre et Musc by L’Artisan Parfumeur. I got a whiff of it from a girl I had a crush on from class. I remember rushing out to the boutique in the seventh arrondissement right after school that day to buy myself a bottle. I especially loved how it started out fruity, sweet, juicy, gourmand, then opened into musky and woody notes—ending with warm and sensual oriental notes. That is exactly how I remember it evolving on my skin. The fruity and woody ingredients in particular transport me back to my younger childhood memories of vacationing in Bordeaux at Château Lagarosse, my family’s castle, plucking fresh wild blackberries, and our travels to Morocco where I was first stirred by the aroma of spices and incense burning. It was then that I started playing alchemist in my bathroom—crushing raw pieces of musk and resins and mixing them with essential oils. Needless to say, this influenced my inconscient collectif [collective unconscious] and the decision to go with a short list of carefully handpicked raw materials with oriental notes for Le Premier Parfum. But when I walk into a perfumery today that carries Mûre et Musc, I still get all excited at the chance of spraying it on and letting the magic of its scent take me back in time.”