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July 30 2014

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A Morning Power Smoothie an Herbalist Swears By

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rosie-smoothie

This column features weekly tips and advice from a revolving cast of industry leaders on hand to discuss your beauty dilemmas, from blemishes to Botox.

I’ve fallen into a green juice rut. Instead of ordering the usual, I’m inspired to make my own. What’s a fast recipe that packs a healthy punch?

I love to have a power smoothie in the morning. The ingredients vary depending on the season. I usually start with pigmented fruits, like blueberries and raspberries, which improve capillary health and are loaded with antioxidants. The addition of organic gelatin is ideal for collagen formation, and a tablespoon of fish oil (that doesn’t taste fishy) is great for blood sugar balance, gut health, eye health, the list goes on! And a bit of spirulina boosts energy, while ashwagandha is an amazing Ayurvedic herb that improves stress and energy levels. Here’s my recipe:

1 cup of organic frozen blueberries and raspberries
1 scoop of protein powder (I use either Tera’s Whey goat whey or Blue Mountain hydrolysable organic gelatin)
1 tablespoon of oat bran (a slow-release carb that’s high in many vitamins and minerals)
1 tablespoon of pre-emulsified fish oil (I use Pharmax Frutol, which has no fish taste and mango fruit puree added so it blends even better)
1 handful of spinach (high in folic acid, chlorophyll, and fiber)
1 green apple or seasonal fruit (I love pineapple, too)
2 teaspoons of spirulina
1 tablespoon of goji berries (great for building blood, high in nutrients)
1 teaspoon of ashwagandha powder

I blend all together. (You may need to add a little water depending on the water content of the fruit.) This keeps me going until lunch and gives me a real boost for the day!

A leader in herbal medicine, Daniela Turley is a board member of the American School of Natural Health and a member of The American Herbalists Guild, and The College of Practitioners of Phytotherapy. Born and raised in England, Turley received her bachelor of science in herbal medicine and held an honorary position at the Hale Clinic, the renowned complementary health center in London. In 2011, Turley moved to New York City, where she joined the practice of Shellie Goldstein Acupuncture.

Photo: Instagram

Is Oil Pulling the Secret to a Whiter Smile?

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betteTo pull or not to pull—that is the current question. We’re well aware of the benefits of using oil unclog pores, but what about your mouth? Talk of the trend has been making the rounds lately, with everyone from Shailene Woodley to Gwyneth Paltrow singing its praises. But is the key to a whiter smile and better breath as simple as swishing? We asked Manhattan dentist Dr. Marc Lowenberg for the lowdown.

The idea: First off, the best time to utilize this practice is “in the morning, before eating or drinking anything,” noted Lowenberg. Coconut, sesame, or olive are optimum choices, and “the concept is incredibly simple: A person swishes about 1 to 2 teaspoons of vegetable-based oil in the mouth for twenty minutes, spits it out, and rinses well with warm water,” he explained. “Don’t forget to brush well after rinsing.”

The bottom line: “Just as oil cleanses the skin, oil pulling improves oral health…it cuts through plaque and removes toxins without disturbing teeth or gums,” said Lowenberg. “It also has the added effect of whitening teeth naturally.” Even better, the side effects of topical whitening treatments (such as sensitivity to hot and cold) are a thing of the past with this age-old remedy.

Photo: Indigital

The Coffee-Free Way to Kick-Start Your Day

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photo_blogThis column features tips and advice from a revolving cast of industry leaders on hand to discuss your beauty dilemmas, from blemishes to Botox.

I am hooked on my morning coffee for energy. Is there a natural alternative that’s better for my body?

First, I’d ask: What’s your reason for wanting to give up coffee? If you’re having only one cup a day, it’s unlikely to do much harm. In fact, coffee has been shown to increase metabolism (half a cup a day might boost metabolism by 4 percent), and it’s rich in antioxidants. But the number one reason most people cut it out? Coffee increases adrenaline, which can heighten anxiety. It’s also very acidic, if you have any gut issues. I’d suggest starting to wean yourself off with a caffeinated beverage, as this will help lessen the side effects of “coming off” the liquid fuel. Start with black tea, the highest in caffeine, then after a week, switch to green tea, then lastly to white (unfermented green tea), which is the lowest in caffeine. All these drinks will boost your energy and are rich in antioxidants. Tea also contains the amino acid L-theanine, which has a calming effect on anxiety. If you want to avoid caffeine entirely, switch to a ginseng tea. It has many health benefits—ranging from enhanced immunity to improvement of mental and physical performance—and will give you a boost in energy. Added bonus: It has a cortisol-sparing effect, so it actually helps treat the adrenal fatigue associated with high coffee intake.

A leader in herbal medicine, Daniela Turley is a board member of The American School of Natural Health, a member of The American Herbalists Guild, and The College of Practitioners of Phytotherapy. Born and raised in England, Turley received her bachelor of science in herbal medicine, and held an honorary position at the Hale Clinic, the renowned complementary health center in London. In 2011, Turley moved to the New York City where she joined the practice of Shellie Goldstein Acupuncture.

—As told to Kari Molvar

Can Your Pillowcase Lead to Better Skin?

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breakfast-at-tiffanys-cat
There has been a lot of pillow talk recently, with fabric cases claiming to do everything from preventing fine lines to minimizing breakouts. But does a rectangular piece of cloth have the power to change your complexion? We asked New York City dermatologist Francesca Fusco if this trend is beauty magic or total B.S:

There are a handful of high-tech linens worth considering, noted Fusco. The most promising one is the Iluminage Skin Rejuvenating Pillowcase, which has support from a small study that demonstrated a decrease in the appearance of crow’s-feet after eight weeks of sleeping on a pillowcase that contains copper oxide, which “upregulates the secretion of extracurricular skin proteins,” she explained. Something like the BeautyZZZ Natural Silk Pillowcase takes the classic version to the next level with its chemical-free, hypoallergenic material. “It will diminish sleep lines as well as be gentle on sensitive-skin types,” Fusco said. “But make sure you wash it with hypoallergenic detergent, otherwise you defeat the purpose.” Then there are pillowcases geared toward breakouts, like the Nufabrx Pillowcase for Blemish Prone Skin, which has a blend of four essential oils in its weave. “Acne can be exacerbated by stress and the subsequent cortisol spikes—if aromatherapy helps diminish stress and subsequent acne, this pillowcase could be a good thing.”

The bottom line: Bonus points for sleeping on complexion-boosting blends, but laundering whatever fabric you put your face to each night on the reg is the real key to getting a flawless facade with your eyes closed.

Photo: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

No Dairy? No Sugar? What Really Works for Clearing Up Acne

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isabel-marantThis column features tips and advice from a revolving cast of industry leaders on hand to discuss your beauty dilemmas, from blemishes to Botox.

I’ve heard cutting out dairy and sugar can help clear up acne. True? I want to be sure before I make the sacrifice.

Yes, studies link a diet high in dairy and sugar to acne, sadly. The same research also shows acne sufferers tend to have low fish intake and high saturated and trans-fat levels. It seems that this kind of diet can induce insulin and sebum production in the skin, which can aggravate acne. So avoiding sugar, high-glycemic-index foods, and cows’ dairy, and taking a probiotic (at least 5 billion organisms) would be the first step. Next, I would recommend a dietary supplement containing specific nutrients: zinc, B-complex, vitamin A, vitamin E, and copper, for example, have been shown to clear up 88 percent of patients’ acne in eight weeks (with 76 percent citing this blend as effective as antibiotics). Herbal medicine can help as well. An individualized consultation is best, but I often find that a formula with skin depuratives, immune boosters, and lymphatic stimulants is very successful. I developed a version, called Fresh Faced Skin Tea, which targets all these areas. If you can’t get ahold of this, taking burdock tea three times a day along with an echinacea (thirty to forty drops of tincture) is a good alternative. Lastly, if your breakouts are hormone-related, add in the hormone-balancing herb Agnus castus in the morning (twenty drops of tincture). Stick with this regimen and your acne should clear up in two to three months.

A leader in herbal medicine, Daniela Turley is a board member of The American School of Natural Health, a member of The American Herbalists Guild, and The College of Practitioners of Phytotherapy. Born and raised in England, Turley received her bachelor of science in herbal medicine, and held an honorary position at the Hale Clinic, the renowned complementary health center in London. In 2011, Turley moved to the New York City where she joined the practice of Shellie Goldstein Acupuncture.

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde; Indigitalimages.com