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April 20 2014

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22 posts tagged "Anthony Turner"

Twin Peaks Meets Blue Velvet, Backstage at Kenzo

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kenzo“We’re taking a classic look and twisting it—a bit like a David Lynch film,” explained mane master Anthony Turner. Inspired by the collaboration between the designers (Carol Lim and Humberto Leon) and the famed director on the sculptural set and music for today’s show, the backstage pro crafted a “Twin Peaks ponytail.” After making a strong center part and securing the hair at the back of the head, he wrapped the band with extensions and “hacked off” the ends with scissors or “men’s clippers,” forming a blunt, severe line. To cancel any flyaways, L’Oréal Professionnel Mythic Oil was smoothed on top.

Another Lynch film, Blue Velvet, obviously served as a reference for face painter Aaron de Mey. He used MAC Chromaline in Marine Ultra on the upper rims, a shade he described as “Yves Klein blue.” His reason for selecting such a vibrant hue: “The [runway] is dark and tough, so this gives it an elevation and illumination.” As for the “fifties” wing shape, it was reminiscent of Sherilyn Fenn’s signature cat-eye in the aforementioned nineties series, de Mey explained. The finishing touch that channeled the cinematic theme were models’ flocked navy nails, whose fuzzy texture and color recalled—what else?—Isabella Rossellini’s crushed velvet robe.

Photo: Indigitalimages.com

Sam Rollinson’s Trial Run

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sam-rollinsonHair was piling up on the floor backstage at Anthony Vaccarello when I came upon mane master Anthony Turner’s station. He was carving his way around the head of Brit beauty Sam Rollinson. “He said, ‘Listen, I really, really, really need Sam in the show, but I prefer her hair how it was,’” Turner said of his conversation with the designer. “The only way to get around that was a wig.” Over her twenties bob sat an updated version of her previous “hard-lined, seventies bowl,” but this time it was more “aggressive” and “rock ‘n’ roll.” Choppy, “chewed-up” layers were snipped in the same vein as short-haired catwalkers like Edie Campbell (who inspired the Joan Jett-esque shags at Marc Jacobs a few seasons ago). “I was thinking if I had got the chance to cut Sam’s hair for real, how would I do it. Now I have the chance to do just that,” explained Turner. “It’s very deconstructed, a bit all over the place—almost as if she’s done it herself,” he said of the final result. As for Rollinson, she’s ready to sport this style for longer than ten minutes (the approximate length of a runway show). “I really like it, it’s really cool,” she said of her new crop. Turner’s last piece of advice to the model who is planning to grow her hair out: “Let me cut it for you next time.”

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde; Indigitalimages.com

Gettin’ Flossy, Backstage at Anthony Vaccarello

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anthony-vaccarelloInspiration comes from everywhere, and in the case of makeup artist Tom Pecheux, we mean everywhere. Before the face painter left for Milan, he had concocted an entirely different look with the designer. Upon returning to Paris, they both decided it wasn’t right. So what brilliant tool does one turn to when in need of something fresh? Floss. (Yes, really.) “That same morning before going to the fitting I had an appointment with the dentist, and I was sitting in the dentist’s chair, and I was like, ‘Ah, yes—floss,’” Pecheux said. (It wouldn’t have been my first thought while awaiting the drill, but hey, that’s what makes the man such a genius.) After prepping lids with powder and using a black pencil in between the lashes, he coated a strand of floss wound tightly between his fingers with Estée Lauder Pure Color Envy Sculpting Lipstick in Envious, then pressed it above the top lashes and below the bottom set. With model Liu Wen acting as his “sexy assistant” by holding the Double Wear Zero-Smudge Liquid Eyeliner while he ran the string over the tip, Pecheux framed the graphic red lines with skinny black bands, adding a final onyx slash in the “banana” (i.e., crease). Aside from a trip to the dentist’s office, illustrators like René Gruau and Tony Viramontes inspired the eighties-meets-rock-and-roll maquillage; the color palette came by way of the collection (particularly the shiny, crimson ruffle on Look 26). While this isn’t the first time Pecheux reached for floss in a fashion context (having used it for an editorial in V magazine), improvements in oral care did pose a new challenge: “Fifteen years ago dental floss was dry, and now it has wax on it, so it’s very slippery,” he noted.

The hair by Anthony Turner was equally as edgy, but in lieu of clean lines, the pro employed a “bit of bend” to give strands movement. After prepping with L’Oréal Professionnel Tecni Art Pli Thermo-Fixing Spray, he pressed sections in with his fingers while blow-drying. “It shouldn’t feel too sad—it’s not about grungy, lank, nothing hair,” he explained. A masculine side part was made, Wild Stylers Next Day Hair (“a dry shampoo without the dustiness”) was misted all over, and the length was tucked behind the ears and into the “polar necks” that completed the majority of the ensembles—a gesture we’ve seen multiple times throughout the season. “She means business, I reckon, this woman. She doesn’t even think about her hair,” said Turner. I reckon I’d agree.

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde; Indigitalimages.com

Fashion’s House of Horrors, Backstage at Erdem

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erdemAn abandoned, almost derelict, old hotel; a plush red-carpeted catwalk; dark and intense lighting: The setting for Erdem’s Fall 2014 show was as dramatic as the ornate clothes that were soon to make their way down the catwalk.

Makeup artist Val Garland summed up the look in terms of a movie title: Village of the Damned. She perfected complexions using NARS Pure Radiant Tinted Moisturizer and Radiant Creamy Concealer, purposefully leaving the area around the eyes bereft of base so that the skin took on its own natural shading and contours—a choice inspired by the work of photographer Sarah Moon. Lids were slicked with clear gloss before Larger Than Life Long-Wear Eyeliner in Via Veneto was used to rim the upper and lower waterlines. To keep focus entirely on the eyes, brows were toned down with a touch of foundation. Staying true to the face painter’s previous assertion that she has “not touched a mascara wand in London this season,” lashes were left bare, and lips were patted with stick concealer to cancel the natural pinky tones.

Manicurist Jenni Draper carried the theme onto nails with a few coats of Essie nail lacquer in Allure. “We wanted something ghostly but not too white,” she said. “A shade with a lot of white would just be too high fashion, and that’s not what this woman is about.”

In addition to Moon, hairstylist Anthony Turner cited Jane Eyre as a reference point. With the literary heroine in mind, he crafted a wispy and ethereal knot at the nape of the neck, using L’Oréal Professionnel Tecni Art Pli for texture. With just his fingertips, he teased strands of hair to fall over the face like a veil. “This gives the impression of something more ethereal and romantic,” he explained. “Val left the skin quite glossy, so the idea is that the hair will stick to the face, lending her a mysterious quality.”

Photo: Indigital

Delinquent Schoolgirls, Backstage at Topshop Unique

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topshopMakeup artist Hannah Murray described the look at Topshop Unique as a rebellious boarding-school girl, which translated to eyes heavily rimmed with Topshop Beauty Kohl in Coal. “The key is to keep the liner solid-looking—it’s not meant to be grungy,” explained Murray. Mascara, while not particularly popular this season thus far, played its part here to create “super-cloggy” lashes that clumped together. The new Cheek Gels (on shelves this fall) in Sibling and Beep added a hint of color to the face. The inspiration? “I was thinking of flushed choirboys, so I kept the darker blush low on the cheeks and the brighter shade higher up.”

Hairstylist Anthony Turner carried over the schoolgirl vibe by crafting long, straight strands. Where models had layers, Turner deftly placed wefts to bring the length in line. L’Oréal Professionnel Tecni Art Pli, a setting spray, held center parts in place while Mythic Oil imparted luster to the ends. Just before the girls hit the runway, Turner lightly ruffled up the back of the hair to give the impression they “had been up to something naughty.”

Photo: Indigital