Style.com

August 23 2014

styledotcom Meet @Ayyuka_band, Turkey's genre-defying musical powerhouse: stylem.ag/1rNEGty @ece_sukan pic.twitter.com/nhLxsWDnPI

Subscribe to Style Magazine
33 posts tagged "Balenciaga"

Steal This Balenciaga Beauty Look—for Under $12

-------

BLOG_collage_1

Nicolas Ghesquière’s final Balenciaga collection (Spring ’13, left) may feel like a distant memory in light of his new role at Louis Vuitton, but it will always be one of our all-time favorites. In addition to the striking silhouettes, high-tech fabrics, and a bra top that spurred a thousand copies (see Look 1), the hair was particularly on point: Each model’s imperfect ‘do was topped off with a gilded half-moon barrette. I’ve been dreaming about the minimal accessory ever since, and was willing to pay top dollar for one of my own—or at least a really good substitute. I’d all but given up when I stumbled upon this clip at Urban Outfitters for $12. I’m stocking up in the rare chance they sell out or get lost in the depths of my bag. The flash of gold will instantly elevate my denim-heavy uniform, not to mention messy second-day hair. It might just be the easiest DIY runway trend I’ve come across yet.

gold-clip

EXCLUSIVE: Alexander Wang Spills the Secrets Behind Balenciaga’s Fall Campaign and Gisele Bündchen’s Cropped Cut

-------

balenciaga-gisele-bundchen-ad-3

Alexander Wang’s goal at Balenciaga is not to adapt but to “break the mold.” And for his third runway season at the storied house, the young designer did just that—adding knitwear with new hybrid treatments to the mix and experimenting with asymmetrical shapes that play on the brand’s classic codes. In the latest Fall 2014 campaign, shot by Steven Klein, Wang continues to push boundaries and rock the status quo by depicting Gisele Bündchen—a model made a legend thanks to her feminine curves and beachy waves—with a masculine cropped cut. The 360-degree view we’re given of her shorn and slicked-back strands in a series of cracked mirrors makes each image all the more intriguing. Similar to an audience questioning how a magician pulls a rabbit out of thin air, the viewer is left wondering how Wang stripped the super of her hallmark attributes to pull this one off. Here, the artistic director does the unthinkable and reveals his secrets exclusively to Style.com.

How does this campaign represent your vision for Balenciaga?

Compared to the first two campaigns that I did with the brand, we really wanted this one to break the mold a little bit. The first one was an homage and more austere, and we never really showed the face. And for the last one, with Daria [Werbowy], it became this idea of transformation. I like this idea of taking iconic supermodels and showing them in a new light and a different way. Specifically with Gisele, she’s known for her hair, so we said, “Let’s show Gisele like she’s never been shown before and this idea of mystery and vanity.” She’s in this black, mirrored room and she’s breaking out of it. In the first season, we had the marble veins [on the runway and in the collection], and then it became the ivy, and then this season the cracked glass—so it was a continuing thread that tied them together as well.

Does the cracked glass represent breaking the mold of what Balenciaga once was as a house?

I mean, in a sense. Yes, I guess vaguely. I think there’s something so beautiful when there’s an organic touch to it. I love this idea of veins in the marble or things that [are] graphic [but still] organic. That element is very interesting to me because there is a rawness to it.

balenciaga-gisele-bundchen-ad-1

Where did your inspiration stem from for these visuals?

We worked with Gisele on the show, she closed the show, and we really wanted her. Gisele has been around and shown in so many different ways. So we said, “OK, we want to show Gisele in a way that people have never seen her before.” That was the first goal for us to achieve, and that’s very hard for someone that has done almost everything and has worked with so many different brands and people! It really started with this idea of transforming Gisele and capturing what we felt was different about her being part of the Balenciaga brand. We love showing her really uncompromised and that ultimate extreme beauty breaking out of a mirror. It’s almost beauty so powerful [it can't be contained]. And also to empower women to cut their hair and feel confident and feel beautiful and feel desired.

We’ve seen Gisele recently and her waves are still very much intact. Was there a bit of Photoshop magic at play within this campaign?

I mean, yes, of course. There was a whole team involved. We had a specialist [Jane Choi] come in who actually works on movie sets doing prosthetics. We spent two days making a prosthetic bald cap on a Gisele body double. And then we had to get another body double who we had to give the exact same haircut. So for every picture we took with Gisele, we had to take another picture with the body double. Then we fused those two together. It was the first time I’ve ever worked in that way, and [master retoucher] Pascal Dangin, he’s just incredible. He’s a true artist and a painter. When he was showing me the mock-ups, I was blown away by what he was able to achieve before we even got to the shoot.

balenciaga-gisele-bundchen-ad-2

How hard was it to achieve the finished result, as you see the hair from so many different angles?

The funny thing was that Gisele had to come in three hours before call time just to put the bald cap on. We had to wrap the hair very, very flat to her head, put the bald cap on, and then paint the bald cap to the exact same skin color as Gisele. It was basically like putting her into what you usually see on sets like X-Men. Every time we shot the picture it was kind of crazy because it was always just shooting her with the bald cap on and then having to visualize a bald Gisele. Then we’d go in and shoot the body double and that whole process. In the end, seeing it all come together was really magical.

Since we’re seeing Gisele in an entirely new way, who is the Balenciaga girl and how has she evolved since you arrived at the house?

I feel that for me right now the most important thing is to show this idea of empowerment, and people always talk about confidence and strength. It was a bit more understated, and this collection was [one] where I was really breaking through a lot of barriers and connotations, and I wanted the campaign and visuals to represent that. It’s kind of like a continuing dialogue. I never like to put exactly into words who the girl is because the collections speak for themselves. Also, there is something that is celebrated about individuality, and I like that any woman can come to Balenciaga and make it her own.

balenciaga-gisele-bundchen-ad-4

What do you think Cristóbal Balenciaga would say about seeing a woman with a shaved head in one of his campaigns?

I don’t know! He was always one to look at women in a different way. I think that’s something that I share in terms of an outlook. If he were living today in our world and our society, and wanting to do something that was different and open up some eyes…hopefully I did him proud.

In terms of Balenciaga, what’s next? What are your plans for expansion?

We have the fragrance [B. Balenciaga, pronounced Bee-dot] that’s coming out this fall. That’s going to be big for me because I’ve never done a fragrance before. And we have a couple of new launches, so it’s a little too early to say, but you’ll just have to stay tuned!

Stay tuned we will.

Want to replicate the Balenciaga buzz without losing all of your length? Anthony Turner, the hair pro who created the slick style that was placed over Bündchen’s bald cap in post, says: “Try pulling your hair back with a low masculine-inspired side part and strong hairline to give the impression of a shorter cut.”

Photos: Courtesy of Balenciaga

Kristen Stewart on Scent, Smoky Eyes, and Her Strange Aversion to Peplums

-------

kristen-stewart

Sitting down with Kristen Stewart, I knew I wasn’t in for an interview with your typical, perky perfume spokeswoman who wants to pose for selfies and gab about her go-to mascara (although I asked). She was surprisingly real—wearing a black Balenciaga leather jacket, no nail polish, and her signature mussed-up waves. She was also very candid about the fact that what you see on the red carpet is the product of a talented team—she wakes up with “raccoon eyes” just like the rest of us. And if you’re wondering: She smiled and laughed. Here, Stewart reveals her thoughts on the new Rosabotanica fragrance from Balenciaga (for which she is the face) and the two things you’ll never see her wear.

What do you like most about Rosabotanica?
It’s the perfect counterpart to Florabotanica, which I really grew to love and use constantly. I haven’t had much experience with fragrance, so it’s nice to expand my collection—even though I’m at two right now. It’s slightly warmer and a bit more bold; you get a lot of the rose in there. I might wear it at night versus day.

Where do you spritz it?
Classic spots: two under the neck and one over what I’m wearing so it stays on the clothes. Neither of them is too in-your-face—Florabotanica even less than Rosa.

Before you were introduced to Balenciaga, what was your go-to scent?
This is where I started. I started doing this when I was 22 or something. Possibly 21. I hadn’t really experimented with using fragrance.

So there wasn’t even a bit of Curve or cucumber melon body mist in the mix as a teenager?
No, I wasn’t that type of teenager. I started off well [she said, pointing to the fragrance].

Growing up in a family of all boys, how did you learn about beauty?
Sort of by default. It was never a huge priority for me when I was younger. It was something I had to do for my job and something that I always strained to do. I think I noticed a pointed difference in how I approached this whole world when I met Nicolas [Ghesquière] on a photo shoot. It was really concept-oriented, beautiful, and elaborate—the same energy I really appreciate on a movie set was on this photo shoot [with Bruce Weber for Interview]. [Nicolas] was so awesome and driven and clearly a very talented artist. He opened my eyes to that side of things. I would probably be a very different version of myself without [all this]. It pulls out slightly more buried sides of you. I grew up as a full-on tomboy—looked like a boy until I turned 15.

Somehow, I don’t think that’s possible.
Dude, you could not decipher between my brother and me.

Was your hair really short?
Yeah. I wore his clothes, full on didn’t care at all about anything—I realized I was a girl when I turned 14. It’s been a slow, steady progression, but looking at things now from the outside, I’m super into it. I like the extremes of [beauty]—I like that you can go really hard to one side or the other. I don’t like that middle ground that’s deemed “pretty” [she said, using air quotes].

We often see you in a smoky eye, but rarely a bright lip. Why?
I like a nude lip more, but I don’t like anything in between. So you’re right, if I’m going to do a lip, I’m going to do a lip. I’m going to do a really bold, deep color—usually red. Usually it coincides with the outfit; it depends on what I’m wearing. When it works, I think it really works.

What is the best beauty tip you’ve ever learned?
Water and sleep.

I suppose both are a rare indulgence for all of us.
If you think about it and you’re feeling kinda rough, if you just give yourself a nice week of treating yourself really well, you’ll look better. This is so lame—my answers are ridiculous right now—but if you’re happy, you look better. If you stay positive—negative people just walk around and…

Yep, nobody likes a negative Nancy.
The only reason I’m saying this is because I genuinely don’t have these beauty tips, but I try not to wash my hair so much because it gets dry. And that’s about it.

So how do you get your perfectly undone waves?
Well, my hairstylist woke up really early…I don’t really like to use too much heat on my hair when I’m not working. I think he used a few loose curlers and sort of [finger-combed] and used a little bit of hairspray. My hair was really clean, too, which usually I don’t like. I like to add volume with dry shampoo and mousse—I like to gunk it up. So I’m feeling fresh today!

You’ve had various hair colors, ranging from blond to black. Which do you think suits your personality best?
Probably brown hair. When I’m blond, I feel very blond. I like having darker hair, but to have jet-black hair, it is a thing. It becomes your look a little bit. I like to stay neutral. When I’m not working, I like to be ready to sort of—it sounds lame—but transform. If I’m ever definitively something, I’m always like, Oh, God, well now I’m going to have to change that soon anyway. It’s always very fleeting.

You’re famous for your porcelain complexion. What’s your secret?
I use the Proactiv [three-step system]. It really works for me. I’ve used it since I was a teenager and I just sort of kept it going. And if I stop [my skin] will go crazy. Maybe that’s not true, but I’m just going to hold onto it while it’s working. I try to moisturize a little bit more because it has a tendency to dry your skin out a little bit. I like Dr. Hauschka and Dermalogica [products].

Do you have any tricks for getting a smoky eye—at least when you’re doing it yourself?
Yes, that’s a very different situation. I’m actually really lucky because I don’t have to do much makeup because I have raccoon eyes—they are so dark. It’s good and bad for me—it’s not just the top, it’s the bottom, too. That I roll with. I use concealer for the bottom. I use black eyeliner and mascara messily, smudge it, and literally that’s it.

What are your go-to goods for that look?
I switch it around often. I’m given a lot of makeup, so I just use what I have. I’m not that specific. It’s fun when you do find something that really is awesome.

So what’s an example of a product that’s really awesome?
There’s actually this [black] eyeliner from Topshop. It’s inexpensive, really good—I buy five of them at a time because they stop making stuff like that. You’ll find something you really dig, and then it’s gone.

What is your biggest beauty mistake?
There have definitely been a few because I’ve been doing this stuff since I was so young. Literally, at 12 or 13 I was walking my first few red carpets. So I bet if I looked back through a few of those photos…I mean, it doesn’t really matter because I was 12, 13, or 14, so it’s hard to harshly judge myself—but I’m like, What were you thinking?! But I do take credit for all of it, the good and the bad. I was into it then, so there ya go.

Gotta own it. So who is your beauty icon now?
I just worked with Juliette Binoche, and really, it’s alarming almost, her beauty. When she walks into a room, people gravitate toward her. You can’t help but look at her. This might sound a little ridiculous, but genuinely she has a grace that’s undeniable. She’s really a woman to look up to. She’s amazing.

Is there something you would never try, like, say, teal eyeshadow?
I feel like I’ve done teal eyeshadow! I probably wouldn’t do black lipstick, unless we were doing some weird, high-concept shoot, which could be cool.

Never say never, I guess.
I don’t like peplums [she says with gusto]. It’s insane that they exist. There are one or two things that the stylist I’ve worked with since I was kid, since I was literally 13, will never get me in—like a high-heeled boot.

Wait, why?
They’re great on other people. I just have this very odd aversion to high-heeled boots and peplums.

Hey, everyone has their thing. What was it like to play a female soldier in Camp X-Ray?
She’s an interesting girl, that character, because the times where she feels most comfortable and most like herself is definitely when she’s in uniform. So trying to find her outside of uniform was interesting because it was very bare, but not necessarily in a good way. She has to build herself up a little bit before that vulnerability is an attractive quality. Every time she put on the uniform, it was like you bind the hair, you wear no makeup, don’t pluck your eyebrows, and you take any chance of being considered pretty away. It’s like you’re not going to think about it, it’s not even an option. My makeup artist was awesome. She added a lot of freckles and made me a little bit sun-damaged—it was really subtle, you wouldn’t notice unless I said it. Then you’d be like, Wow, I can’t believe that’s makeup.

So I assume that meant less time in hair and makeup every day?
It was really quick. It was pretty amazing.

Of all the characters you’ve played over the years, whose beauty look do you identify with the most?
It’s tough because the characters I’ve played are very specific and slightly extreme, like the ones who actually have definitive looks—like Joan [Jett]. Some of the other parts that I’ve played are just very normal, just a girl. In a very boring way, just because I’m fairly simple and practical—I’m sure people will love this—but Bella in Twilight is pretty straightforward. And to be honest, that’s very much like who I am. At the same time, if I think about what I aspire to…all of the characters in On the Road, as much as it’s a period piece and it’s hard to identify with the specific clothes, the garments themselves, the way they wore them is so cool. We’re not used to wearing dresses and stockings, but they were. So it was taking those things and making it look like it’s not formal in any way. I like things that look lived-in.

As long as they’re not a peplum or a high-heel boot.
Absolutely not.

She’s Come Undone

-------

SeriousFun London Gala 2013 - Red Carpet ArrivalsThis past season at Proenza Schouler, hairstylist Paul Hanlon was intent on preserving the gentle haze of fuzz that models arrived with backstage at the show. “What you’d normally control, we’re not,” he said, in fear that strands would look more “commercial” if he were to tame every flyaway. Keira Knightley appeared to have followed the same credo at last night’s SeriousFun gala in London. Her undone waves (seen at shows like Balenciaga and Balmain) added an easy elegance to her Chanel Haute Couture gown—the same one she wore for her walk down the aisle and to a party in 2008. A hot hair trend—and great dress—is always worth repeating.

Photo: Getty

Bows Nouveau

-------

Balenciaga - Nina Ricci

Confession: I’m bow curious. I’ve fallen for the hair bows worn by Nouvelle Vague-era actresses Catherine Deneuve, Anna Karina, and Brigitte Bardot, but can’t figure out how they managed to turn a perky cheerleader accessory into something stylish and even sex-kittenish. Can a grown woman—who isn’t one of the most beautiful women of all time—really clip a bow in her hair without looking ridiculous?

Recently, I found proof that it’s possible (see: the Spring 2014 Balenciaga and Nina Ricci collections), but I knew that if I wanted to experiment, I’d need professional help. Enter Tommy Buckett of the Serge Normant salon, who created a sixties-inspired style for the Kate Spade Spring 2014 presentation. To avoid one of my major concerns of appearing too juvenile, Buckett ruled out bow-adorned headbands. “You don’t want to look girly or like Alice in Wonderland,” he says. Instead, do as he did at Kate Spade and pull hair up into a topknot, then use Garnier Surfer Hair Power Putty to rough it up and create flyaways. The kiss of death—and fastest way to look like a leftover from Gossip Girl—is not mussing it up a bit. Buckett’s number one rule: “More texture makes it modern.”

If you’re going the topknot route, Buckett suggests playing around with the number of bows: Try one big bow pinned in front of the chignon, or three or five little ones going down the nape of the neck. Another fresh idea is to make a low samurai-style looped ponytail, then tie a satin ribbon in a bow around the base. Finally, if you’re going to try the half-up, half-down look à la Deneuve, avoid her teased, bouncy texture. Buckett’s version: Take a section of hair from one corner of your eye to the other, keep the top part completely flat and straight, and add texture to the bottom with surf spray for a rumpled (but not wavy) finish. The finishing touch: a ribbon where the ponytail holder sits. “The key to the bow,” Buckett says, “is to make it not so pretty.”

Photo: Getty Images; Gianni Pucci / Indigitalimages.com