Style.com

August 30 2014

styledotcom The @V_and_A's hotly attended David Bowie retrospective is coming stateside this fall: stylem.ag/1lA3sjc pic.twitter.com/mnAfZGhbHn

Subscribe to Style Magazine
6 posts tagged "Beauty Nostalgia"

Reminiscing With…Makeup Artist Jenna Menard

-------

crabtree-cropBeauty Nostalgia is a column on Beauty Counter in which we ask influencers, tastemakers, and some of our favorite industry experts to wax poetic on the sticks, salves, and sprays that helped shape who they are today.

The Pro: Jenna Menard, Clinique’s Global Colour Artist

The Product: “Scents can quickly take you back to a time and place. One that does it for me instantly: Crabtree & Evelyn Nantucket Briar Bath & Shower Gel. It brings back my whole childhood. My mom was a hairstylist and was obsessed with not only my hair looking good but smelling good. Every once in a while, she would break out this shower gel and wash my hair with it. She’d always tell me: ‘It smells better than shampoo, and it won’t hurt your hair if you use it every once in a while.’ To this day, the scent brings back memories of her washing my hair in the salon in our basement. From time to time, my mother gives me a bottle of this shower gel as a gift, and it reminds me of being a child with the best-smelling [strands] in school!

Reminiscing With…Lev Glazman

-------

lancome-climatBeauty Nostalgia is a weekly column on Beauty Counter in which we ask influencers, tastemakers, and some of our favorite industry experts to wax poetic on the sticks, salves, and sprays that helped shape who they are today.

The pro: Lev Glazman, co-founder of Fresh

The product: “Growing up in Russia, during the time of the Iron Curtain, there weren’t a lot of fragrances available. There was Red Moscow for men and Red Moscow for women—and both were absolutely horrible. The women’s version was like a fake Chanel No. 5, but instead of smelling like the original’s beautiful notes of rose and chypre, it smelled closer to Lysol. The men’s was pretty disgusting, too—it was a dark green color that stained your clothes when you sprayed it on. But everyone smelled alike at the time. The only way to obtain a different fragrance was on the black market, which is how French fragrances were smuggled into the country. They’re what women bought if they wanted to have a sense of individuality. I remember my mother taking me to this black market when I was about 6. It was very risky—if you were caught you would go to jail—and whatever was smuggled into the country was very expensive. I remember she bought Lancôme Climat and paid 100 rubles for it, which today would be like paying two or three thousand dollars. It was five months’ rent. Climat was a very popular scent in the sixties but never brought into the U.S. It was a rich and concentrated oriental with chypre notes. Today it would be considered old-fashioned. Still, anything that was brought into Russia and smelled different than Moscow Red was special. I remember my mom handing over the money for this fragrance and immediately taking the box and stepping aside to put it on. She was totally transformed. And that moment changed my life. I realized how powerful fragrance could be. I became infatuated with it…every time I smell [Climat], I’m taken back to this place of my childhood.”

Reminiscing With…Laini Reeves

-------

Sun-InBeauty Nostalgia is a weekly column on Beauty Counter in which we ask influencers, tastemakers, and some of our favorite industry experts to wax poetic on the sticks, salves, and sprays that helped shape who they are today.

The pro: Celebrity hairstylist Laini Reeves

The product: “When I was about 14, I was obsessed with bands like Duran Duran, Siouxsie and the Banshees, and Japan. I desperately wanted bleach-blonde, undercut hair. Sun-In was a life-changing discovery at the time, because it was a way to ‘secretly’ bleach my hair without my parents knowing it, or so I thought. I remember convincing nearly every kid in my neighborhood in Birmingham, England, to use Sun-In, too. We’d gather in a friend’s house whose parents didn’t check on us that often and try out the product. As you can imagine, we made a lot of mistakes. You could pick out the kids that I had experimented on by their bleached ‘ombré’ hair. It actually got to the point where a lot of friends were told not to hang out with me anymore! Still, this began my love affair for hair. And to this day, I still have an affinity for Sun-In and would use it in a heartbeat if the right opportunity came along.”

Reminiscing With…Olivia Chantecaille

-------

Dior_resizeBeauty Nostalgia is a weekly column on Beauty Counter in which we ask influencers, tastemakers, and some of our favorite industry experts to wax poetic on the sticks, salves, and sprays that helped shape who they are today.

The Pro: Olivia Chantecaille, creative director of Chantecaille Cosmetics

The Product: “With my mother being from Paris, perfume played a prominent role in our home and upbringing. When I turned 13, my mother encouraged me to find my first fragrance—one that would suit me and be an extension of myself. She brought me back a bottle of Diorissimo, by Christian Dior, from Paris, which is a lovely, delicate scent of lily of the valley and embodies the beauty of innocence and youth. It felt like an important beauty rite of passage as I was entering the world of cosmetics and embracing a ritual loved by my mother and my grandmother. They showed me how to lightly spritz it on the back of my neck, right under my hair, so it would never be overwhelming. That way, the fragrance transforms and becomes your own, never smelling the same on two different people. This fragrance helped to solidify my love of flowers and how to incorporate them into my beauty routine. When I felt like I had outgrown Diorissimo, I moved on to a fragrance my mother created while at Prescriptives, called Calyx, a very modern creation based in green florals that suited me as I left the nest for school and work and explored the world on my own. Soon after, when we launched Chantecaille Cosmetics, we introduced a collection of natural floral fragrances, and I immediately fell in love with Tiare, with notes of refined Tahitian gardenia—a symbol of love. As I look back, I can fondly say that the perfumes I have worn have helped define me and are reminiscent of the special times in my life. They are like an olfactory photo album.”

Reminiscing With…Ilia Beauty’s Sasha Plavsic

-------

Chanel-N-19Beauty Nostalgia is a weekly column on Beauty Counter in which we ask influencers, tastemakers, and some of our favorite industry experts to wax poetic on the sticks, salves, and sprays that helped shape who they are today.

The Pro: Sasha Plavsic, founder of Ilia Beauty

The Product: “When I smell any perfume with green notes, it takes me back to different stages and memories from life. The first memorable scent for me was Chanel No. 19—the scent my mother wore growing up. Not many people can wear No. 19, but thanks to our chemistry, green notes tend to sweeten up nicely on our skin. One spritz of Chanel No. 19 to each wrist and a third at the nape of the neck would be just enough, but not too much. In my early twenties, I chose a softer version—Bvlgari’s White Tea. The notes were similar but lighter, with just a touch of powder, which made it suitable to where I was at the time…very young and still quite innocent. I no longer have the bottle, and actually stopped using this lovely scent after leaving an eight-year relationship several years ago. The scent was nostalgic enough to leave it in the past, with memories that brought a lot of laughter and tears. Both Chanel No. 19 and Bvlgari White Tea have led me to try other scents, like Molecules Escentric 01. I can only smell it for a few minutes, since it’s pheromone based. What’s fascinating is that some people can’t smell it at all, while others will come up to me from the other side of a room and ask, ‘What are you wearing, I can smell it throughout the whole room?’ I guess chemistry is beautiful and, in some ways, always mysterious, like a true woman.”