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April 24 2014

styledotcom .@marinalarroude rounds up the best black & gold finds from Saint Laurent, Marc Jacobs & more: stylem.ag/1jBvRO9 pic.twitter.com/FjB5WLZ2nI

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271 posts tagged "Chanel"

Alexander McQueen’s Creatures Of The Deep

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There are times when conceptual art, rather than actual wearability, can resonate backstage as much as on the runway. Yesterday was one such occasion, when Alexander McQueen presented his Plato’s Atlantis collection, enlightening his hair and makeup team on the wonders of alien movies, Art Nouveau, and Darwinism—all of which informed his Spring presentation. In response, Redken’s Guido Palau and makeup artist Peter Philips crafted looks that were more about a feast for the eyes than anything else. “Some things are like couture,” noted Palau of his intricate amphibious coifs. “It’s a fantasy that’s there to inspire people.” Setting any notions of at-home duplication aside for a moment, Palau’s winged ‘dos and interwoven braids were awe-inspiring for their theatrical nature, which could place them comfortably in a sci-fi super-production—less so in real life. The makeup story unfolded in a similar manner, progressing from a uniform beige base to full-on prosthetics for an homage to otherworldly (or, rather, underworldly) creatures. To capture a certain extraterrestrial allure, Peter Philips started with shiny foundations to even out skin tone and to blank out brows, as is popular practice these days. He followed that up with varying warm and cool shades of Chanel and MAC pigments to conjure “evolutionary” skin tones and shapes. Not necessarily everyday wear, per se, but definitely handy inspiration with All Hallows’ Eve just around the corner.

Photo: Greg Kessler

Peter Philips’ Hay Day At Chanel

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Another day of shows began bright and early in Paris this morning, and with it came yet another lesson in body art. But seeing as how the seminar in question was given by Peter Philips, Chanel’s artistic director of makeup, the season’s prevalent hand-drawn tribal designs and stenciled letters never entered into the equation. “I had them made into transfers,” said Philips in reference to the tattoos he designed for the house’s presentation, which were inspired by blossoms, Chanel chains, and pearls. (To play up the precious stones, Philips used Chanel’s Le Crayon Khôl in Blanc to trace their outline for increased visibility.) “It’s child’s play,” he continued, explaining that the embellishments were intended to add “an extra something” to the fresh look Karl Lagerfeld wanted for the Marie Antoinette-goes-to-the-barn spectacle he staged at the Grand Palais. To skirt the challenging line between eighteenth-century teen queen and farmer’s daughter, Philips turned to soft, blend-able shades, serving up flawless skin and some of the best cheeks we’ve seen this month. The latter came courtesy of Chanel Joues Contraste Blush in Imprévu, which is part of his as-yet-unreleased spring color collection. Citing “purity” and “natural beauty” as forthcoming trends, Philips has taken an optimistic view of the fate of makeup as we slowly climb out of economic decline. “I see a positive approach,” he surmised. “Effortless and beautiful.” (A strategically placed tattoo is, of course, optional.)

Photo: Luca Cannonieri / GoRunway.com

The Ingenue Effect At Fendi

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The tousled topknot? The unintentional wisps of hair hanging just so? If you thought you caught a glimpse of your bed-head on a (very) good day strutting down the Fendi runway, you’re close. Hairstylist Sam McKnight was inspired by Dutch actress Sylvia Kristel’s postcoital tresses as the sultry heroine Emmanuelle, in the 1974 erotic classic of the same name. It marks yet another showing of the messy updo for Spring, which is good news for those of you who, like us, prefer to keep it minimal in the hair department. The key to avoiding looking too unkempt, however, at least according to makeup artist Peter Philips, is sprucing it up with some choice neutral color on the face. Phillips fashioned a mauve smoky eye using two Chanel eye shadows in Silage and Trace for a shimmering halo effect on models’ lids and dusted Chanel’s Fresque, a peach blush, on their cheekbones for a warm, morning-after glow. Multiple coats of black mascara on the top and bottom lashes provided that extra boost of sexy definition. An entirely wearable look with great catwalk-to-sidewalk potential, no?

Photo: Greg Kessler

FNO Recap: Like Halloween, For The Style Set

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With so many gift bags, on-site manis, and transitional “night makeup” applications to be had last night, I decided the best way to cover a lot of ground was to stick to one neighborhood. So for convenience reasons, I chose Soho and made my first stop Anna Sui on Greene Street. I naturally gravitated toward the cosmetics counter, where Sui’s new moisturizing foundation and iridescent nail lacquers were on display, both of which are only available for purchase at her flagship. Bearing that in mind, I picked up a sparkly purple color and continued on my way, past a window display of live male models at the Penguin store and into Space NK Apothecary, where I had my first taste of Champagne. “Can I just pour myself a glass?” I asked of the unattended sparkling rosé sitting on the counter, to which a pleasant shopgirl replied, “Of course!” (This is the kind of retail shopping I could get used to.) After a Bumble and Bumble hair touchup (the new, shorter ‘do has been a big hit at fashion week thus far, for those of you who were wondering), I had a conversation on red lipstick—”It’s Dior,” I said of the discontinued bullet I was reapplying when another crimson-mouthed shopper inquired about my shade of choice. And hers? MAC’s Lady Danger, the same shade that the brand’s vice president of makeup artistry, Gordon Espinet, asked me if I was wearing when I made my way up Spring Street to his party. Espinet took me through MAC’s red-orange color gradient when I revealed that I was not in fact wearing one of his creations (gasp!), and I chose a tube of Morange, one of the best true oranges on the market right now. Needing a little sustenance I remembered a very important freebie happening just across the way at Molton Brown: salty snacks! So I crossed the cobblestones and popped a handful of kettle corn into my mouth. Although I was looking forward to a selection of British ales, as advertised, I happily took a Heineken (apparently Boddingtons only comes in four-packs) and used my right hand to sip while I got a hand massage on the left. Unable to resist the scent of the Eucalyptus and Ginger Scrub my masseur used for pre-rub-down exfoliation, I made yet another purchase and continued south to Chanel. There, past the line of hip-hop enthusiasts stalking Kid Cudi at Bathing Ape, aestheticians were painting nails in the middle of the store using the brand’s new Jade collection. I almost partook, but my current ten-finger salute to Essie’s One of a Kind is just two days old, so I spent my time perusing the accessories case instead. I almost made last night the night I purchased that gold, three-pronged camellia key chain I’ve been coveting, but alas. Maybe next year?

Photo: Gustavo Caballero / Getty Images

Makeup For The Marchesa

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Painted, sketched, and photographed by seemingly just about every famous artist in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Marchesa Luisa Casati has been many things to many people. The eccentric, flame-haired beauty who wore snakes as necklaces and pranced cheetahs in diamond collars through the streets of Paris, Milan, and Capri played living muse to Man Ray and Salvador Dalí, and she’s inspired countless contemporary designers. Galliano, Lagerfeld, and Armani have all dedicated collections to her, as did Tom Ford during his tenure at YSL, and where do you think Georgina Chapman got the name for her fancy dress label? Now the Marchesa has taken her rightful position as beauty icon with not one but two different makeup collections created in her image. The enormous, dark-rimmed eyes Peter Philips whipped up for the Chanel Cruise show were a direct shout-out to Casati’s own sultry aesthetic, while makeup artist Napoleon Perdis channeled the provocateur for his fall color range. His Divine Marchesa collection just debuted with a Boudoir Mist Spray Foundation in five shades; an opulent Dramatic Eye Shadow Quad; Black Sapphire, a matte black nail color; and Ravishing Rose Lip Shine, a vermilion lip stain in a black rose-shaped trinket. It’s enough to pull off a very convincing Casati—live python jewelry not included.

Photo: Courtesy of Napoleon Perdis