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July 11 2014

styledotcom Modesty was the dominant theme during the second day of Berlin fashion week: stylem.ag/1lXloxm pic.twitter.com/U4SjhEhKlD

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4 posts tagged "Clements Ribeiro"

Cut, Copy

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For those of you wondering if the Spring sentiment that sent models to the salon in droves in search of bobs and bowl cuts would return for Fall, the answer appears to be yes. As the shows officially come to an end today, with yet another wig moment at Louis Vuitton, we can confirm that designers are still very much feeling compelling crops. So can Guido Palau. “A lot of people want to see short hair this season,” Palau said backstage at Jean Paul Gaultier, where he was busy trimming “patchwork,” clipped-on-top mullets—a request that he, personally, has been fulfilling with frequency.

It all started at Dior Couture, where the Redken creative consultant gave every girl a convincing pixie cut. Then Palau honed his wig-shaping skills at Marc Jacobs, fashioning an army of Edie Campbells, the Brit It girl he gave a black dye job and a Joan Jett shag for an editorial months earlier. But it didn’t stop there. Sam McKnight picked up the torch at Clements Ribeiro in London, fashioning veritable faux-hawks, a style he reproduced at Fendi in Milan with tight braids accessorized with fox-fur hair pieces a few days later. Next up was Eugene Souleiman’s Rei Kawakubo tribute at Yohji Yamamoto, for which he replicated the Comme des Garçons designer’s architectural black bob, and the stunning pin curls Luigi Murenu designed for Riccardo Tisci’s breathtaking Givenchy collection. Then Karl Lagerfeld got in on the act at Chanel, ordering up colored, similarly graphic hats that sat on top of McKnight’s “done but not done” center-parted strands, thus creating a deceptively short silhouette on top of a long one. This morning, Palau brought it full circle, giving every one of Jacobs’ Louis Vuitton models—Kate Moss included—a “fifties, sort of French Left Bank” bob that was heavy on the mousse for an out-all-night effect.

The season’s overarching punk undertones may have had something to do with the wealth of conceptual cuts that made it onto the runway; nothing captures the subculture’s DIY attitude quite like lopping off excessive length. Suffice it to say, if you’ve ever considered parting ways with your long locks, now would be a great time to do it.

Photo: Gorunway.com

Fall’s Short Story

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Last season, the chin-grazing crop wasn’t so much a trend as a phenomenon. Karlie Kloss may have gotten all the attention when she turned up to the Victoria’s Secret show in November, her mousy brown hair a few inches shorter, but Aline Weber, Ruby Aldridge, and Daria Werbowy had already blazed the edgy, chopped trail for Spring. It’s been interesting to watch hairstylists deal with models’ newfound affinity for short hair. For the most part, they have been content to let the girls with cuts walk without extensions, a rare move that bucks uniformity on the runway. But in a few other more telling instances, they have chosen to take everyone short—make that shorter. Following Guido Palau’s sprinkling of pixie dust backstage at Dior Couture in January, wispy boy cuts and shags have been making waves at the Fall shows. Ruby Jean Wilson started the season with a freshly shorn gamine style, while the shag that Palau gave British It girl Edie Campbell before the collections has not only earned her top billing at shows like Burberry Prorsum, Giles and Marc Jacobs but also inspired the army of impersonators Jacobs sent down his Fall runway. Add to this the floppy coif Swedish stunner Ellinore Erichsen sported at Christopher Kane and Sam McKnight’s recent masculine faux fringes at Clements Ribeiro, not to mention the shows’ overarching punk undercurrents, and there seems to be a new lustful length in town. We’ll see if it holds up in Milan and Paris.

Photo: Gorunway.com

Blue Is The New Black

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Two weeks into the Spring shows, and there are two dominant decades from which designers seem to be culling inspiration, which has had a sweeping impact on backstage beauty looks as well. While New York’s collective homage to nineties minimalism gave us the simple, no-makeup makeup that threatened to cast a “contours, not colors” spell over the season when things first got under way earlier in the month, an undercurrent of support for the sixties has meant a renewed focus on last season’s eyeliner love, which has been reimagined with a surprising pigment preference: blue. It has come in bright shades of aqua at shows like Clements Ribeiro, where makeup artist Cassie Lomas channeled the “innocent beauty” of Wes Anderson’s Moonrise Kingdom with a slick of Bourjois Metallise Eyeliner Pencil in Bleu Clinqiant, and Moschino Cheap And Chic, where Hannah Murray gave psychedelia an “urban kick” by etching MAC Pro’s Ultra Chromagraphic Pencil in Marine beneath the lower lash line. “[Michael Kors] just wanted to do an eye thing,” Dick Page explained of his similarly hued “floating lines” at the designer’s show, which he drew in a banana shape through the crease. Predictable shades of black got more competition from midnight iterations as well at shows like Mary Katrantzou, where Val Garland fashioned an inky elongated almond line with a blend of MAC Lipmixes in Blue and Red, and perhaps most notably at Altuzarra. “I think it’s so chic,” Tom Pecheux said of MAC’s Technakhol Pencil in Auto-de-blu—”a royal blue,” he declared backstage at the designer’s show—which he brushed along upper lash lines to a squared-off edge. That right there is endorsement enough for us.

Photo: Clockwise from top left, Luca Cannonieri / Gorunway.com at Michael Kors; Luca Cannonieri / Gorunway.com at Mary Katrantzou; Tim Whitby / Getty Images at Clements Ribeiro; Luca Cannonieri / Gorunway.com at Altuzarra; Luca Cannonieri / Gorunway.com at Moschino Cheap & Chic

Seeing Red For Spring

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Black cat-eye liner was the eye makeup trend of the Spring season (click here for more of our top ten beauty moments), but there was another unlikely eye pigment shade that got a fair bit of play: red. It turned up in varying degrees of opacity—from a wash of color at Clements Ribeiro and Anna Sui to a much more “fab, fun look,” as Pat McGrath referred to the heavily rimmed crimson lids she slicked on at Miu Miu. “It’s really the idea of a splash of color—be it red, blue, or green,” McGrath explained when we recently had the pleasure of recapping the season’s most significant beauty developments with her. “It’s not like every girl is going to be walking around with red lids.”

But if you do want to give the look a whirl, there are myriad ways to successfully go scarlet. For a more subtle effect, try buildable semi-sheer pigments, like MAC Pro Chromacake in Crimson and Coral, which makeup artist Lucia Pica smudged across eyes at House of Holland for a “watercolorlike” finish; or go with a creamy blush, like CoverGirl and Olay Simply Ageless Sculpting Blush in Lush Berry, which McGrath multitasked on eyes and cheeks backstage at Anna Sui. To go bold with the fiery hue, McGrath recommends tracing upper lash lines with—get this—lipstick, and coating that with a professional-grade pigment in the same color. In a recent trial run, we found chubby lipstick pencils, like Mirabella’s new Velvet Lip Pencils in Red Velvet, are the easiest tools for the task. Top that off with a theatrical red shadow, like Lime Crime’s Magic Dust Eyeshadow in Siren, and you should be good to go.

Photo: Luca Cannonieri / GoRunway.com; Courtesy of