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August 28 2014

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5 posts tagged "David Pollock"

A Real Head-Scratcher: The Trouble With Irritating Shampoos

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This column features weekly tips and advice from a revolving cast of industry leaders on hand to discuss your beauty dilemmas, from blemishes to Botox. To submit a question, e-mail celia_ellenberg@condenast.com.

I started using a special curl-specific shampoo and conditioner and have developed a form of eczema from it. I’ve stopped using it since but still have an itchy scalp. What could have possibly caused this reaction, and is there anything I can do to relieve my scalp?”

“Several things could have brought on the problem. While you may have discontinued using the product, your replacement product, or even other items you are using, may still be feeding the issue.

“First, eliminate all of your haircare products that contain harsh chemicals, such as sodium and ammonium lauryl sulfates and sodium and ammonium laureth sulfates. Find one that uses only gentle cleansing agents that are often found in products that are ‘safe for chemically treated hair’ (while yours may not be chemically treated, the labeling is a good indicator that the product is more gentle.) Next, look for products that are ‘synthetic fragrance-free.’ I am not saying eliminate nice-smelling products, but the word fragrance has a legal definition that allows cosmetic companies to incorporate any chemical—including harsh chemicals and solvents—as part of the ‘smell,’ without listing it on the label. I suggest finding products that use essential oils or natural extracts to provide the enticing aroma instead. Your new product should also be designed to help with an itchy scalp, containing an active ingredient such as coal tar, salicylic acid, or pyrithione zinc; you may find one active works better than another. Use it for a few days, then a few times a month to help keep things under control. Follow it with a rich hair conditioner, which you should leave on your scalp, as part of a regular hydrating treatment. You may also want to take a couple drops of olive oil and massage it into your scalp at night before going to bed. It will mess up your hair for the night, but it will nourish your scalp and you can shampoo it out in the morning.

“Take a look at your diet, too. Incorporating different foods that can deliver essential fatty acids 3, 6, 9—such as salmon, flaxseed oil, olive oil, walnuts, broccoli, spinach, and eggs—will help by working from the inside out.”

With over twenty years of experience developing products for some of the most recognized brands in the skincare industry, David Pollock has become a strong voice in the “safe beauty” movement. Speaking out and educating consumers on the potentially harmful ingredients in personal-care products via his own Web site, frequent radio appearances, and the informative book Just Stop The Lies, Pollock launched his first product line, PUR Attitude, this month.

Photo: Photo: Courtesy of FDA.gov

Retinol: A Rundown

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This column features weekly tips and advice from a revolving cast of industry leaders, on hand to discuss your beauty dilemmas, from blemishes to Botox. To submit a question, e-mail celia_ ellenberg@condenast.com.

Why is retinol such a lauded ingredient—and why do most creams recommend using it during the night and not during the day? Are there any forms of retinol that can be used in sunlight?

“Doctors Kligman and Fulton are credited with the discovered uses for Retin-A, which is more commonly used in cosmetics in its over-the-counter adaptation, called retinol. First used for acne, it was later discovered as effective in an even larger market: antiaging. Retinol is a prescription vitamin A derivative that has shown to stimulate blood flow, increase collagen synthesis, and promote cell turnover. But as part of this process, the skin can become quite irritated and dry. Of more concern is that the newly revealed skin cells are delicate and should not be exposed to the sun, which is why it is recommended for nighttime use only—and even when used at night, retinol-treated skin is still sensitive and requires an SPF during the day.

I am not aware of any effective form of retinol that could or should be used during the day. As a matter of fact, if any product claims it, I would want to look into the true level of the ingredient and the effectiveness of it. Remember the mechanism: If the product is effective, by nature, you should not use it during the day. Retinol is also susceptible to light and air (oxygen), causing it to oxidize. There are very few over-the-counter retinol products I would even suggest using, although I know SkinCeuticals has one that is encapsulated with a time-release form of retinol to protect its efficacy and minimize irritation.”

With over 20 years of experience developing products for some of the most recognized brands in the skin care industry, David Pollock has become a strong voice in the “safe beauty” movement. Speaking out and educating consumers on the potentially harmful ingredients in personal care products via his own website, frequent radio appearances, and the informative book Just Stop The Lies, Pollock launched his first product line, PUR Attitude, this month.

Photo: Courtesy of Skinceuticals

A Pore Thing

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This column features weekly tips and advice from a revolving cast of industry leaders, on hand to discuss your beauty dilemmas, from blemishes to Botox. To submit a question, e-mail celia_ ellenberg@condenast.com.

How do pore-reducing creams actually work? Are there any good ones you could recommend?

“We all have pores, which contain hair follicles and are outlets for perspiration and sebum. Sebum provides a natural protective layer over the body. However, some of us have larger pores than others, which occurs for two main reasons: 1) genetics and 2) them being clogged with dead skin cells, dirt, makeup, and other impurities. While we can’t change genetics, we can do everything possible to keep our pores unclogged and, in turn, minimize their appearance.

I recommend 1) using a face wash every day, especially at night to remove makeup and impurities from the day, 2) using a daily physical exfoliator to clean away the dead skin cells and reveal newer, more radiant cells, and for those who are really concerned about pore size, 3) using a pore-reducing serum. Pore-reducing creams typically contain thickeners (or waxes), various emollients, and even oils to help give them that creamy feel. However, those ingredients can clog pores and interfere with the normal sebum production. Even worse, excess oil can mix with dirt and impurities and lead to acne. Serums, however, are typically lightweight, absorb faster and don’t contain all the other ingredients associated with creams. Look for serums containing chemical exfoliators, such as salicylic acid for milder cases, glycolic or lactic acid for more moderate cases, as well as retinol, papaya enzymes, or the newest trend of wild durian fruit enzymes from South Asia. This enzyme has proven so successful, I have used it as the main ingredient in my latest PUR Attitude creation, the Wild Durian Fruit Peel, due out in January.”

With over 20 years of experience developing products for some of the most recognized brands in the skin care industry, David Pollock has become a strong voice in the “safe beauty” movement. Speaking out and educating consumers on the potentially harmful ingredients in personal care products via his own website, frequent radio appearances, and the informative book Just Stop The Lies, Pollock launched his first product line, PUR Attitude, this month.

Photo: Courtesy of PUR Attitude

Dependent Thinking: Can Your Skin Develop An Addiction?

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This column features weekly tips and advice from a revolving cast of industry leaders, on hand to discuss your beauty dilemmas, from blemishes to Botox. To submit a question, e-mail celia_ellenberg@condenast.com.

Is it possible for your skin to become dependent on a certain ingredient—chemical or otherwise—and then ostensibly go through withdrawal when deprived of it causing breakouts, etc.?

“Definitely. It is well documented that our skin becomes ‘used to’ alpha hydroxy acids and retinols, to name a few. That is why products start off with a lower level and slowly work their way up. Our skin becomes more accustomed to them, requiring a stronger dose for results and also less irritation, since our skin has adapted. Conversely, if you stop using these products, your body reverts back to the earlier stage. While it won’t cause breakouts if you stop using the ingredient, your initial skin concern could resurface—and when you restart the product, your skin may react to the change. But if done properly, it would be a minor reaction, if anything.

My favorite trick is to rotate serums with different ingredients. Use your AHA or other peel for a week; week two, use a higher level; week three, focus on a different ingredient, such as antioxidants to fight free radicals; then week four, deep hydration; then back to the beginning.”

With over 20 years of experience developing products for some of the most recognized brands in the skin care industry, David Pollock has become a strong voice in the “safe beauty” movement. Speaking out and educating consumers on the potentially harmful ingredients in personal care products via his own website, frequent radio appearances, and the informative book Just Stop The Lies, Pollock launched his first product line, PUR Attitude, this month.

Photo: Microzoa / Stone / Getty Images

Wear Sunscreen. Even At Night, Though?

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This column features weekly tips and advice from a revolving cast of industry leaders, on hand to discuss your beauty dilemmas, from blemishes to Botox. To submit a question, e-mail celia_ ellenberg@condenast.com.

Should I buy a non-SPF moisturizer for nighttime hydration? I’ve heard this is recommended, but why?

“Definitely. Daytime products have two challenges: They must work well under makeup and they must be concerned with how their antiaging ingredients react with their SPF ingredients. SPF products are considered over-the-counter drugs by the FDA and have a different set of rules. So, while some daytime products are focused around a SPF claim, they cannot easily incorporate a higher level of antiaging ingredients. Night creams, however, can focus on antiaging and provide higher levels of key ingredients, since the concern of makeup and SPF actives, like titanium and zinc oxide, has been eliminated.”

With over 20 years of experience developing products for some of the most recognized brands in the skincare industry, David Pollock has become a strong voice in the “safe beauty” movement. Speaking out and educating consumers about the potentially harmful ingredients in personal care products via his own website, frequent radio appearances, and the informative book Just Stop the Lies, Pollock launched his first product line, PUR Attitude, this month.

Photo: SuperStock