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August 1 2014

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64 posts tagged "Diane Kendal"

Taking It Easy, Backstage at Chloé

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chloe“If someone looks like they put too much effort in, it’s almost not cool,” said hairstylist James Pecis—that’s especially true if you’re the Chloé woman. “Soft,” “fresh,” and “easy” are just a few of the key words both he and makeup artist Diane Kendal used to describe the brand’s DNA and its aesthetic. For Pecis, that meant forming a side part just above the inner corner of the eye, pulling the right side back and tying it at the nape with a piece of elastic to give the impression of an asymmetrical cut. Texture was created via L’Oréal Professionnel Tecni Art Volume Lift Spray-Mousse, which was applied from roots to ends and blown dry. Sections were then wound loosely around a curling iron for a bit of bend and finished off with Wild Stylers Next Day Hair, a formula that works similarly to a dry shampoo. While the end result appeared quite simple, there was an underlying precision. “All of the parts are made on the right and the hair [swooped over] to the left,” Pecis explained. “It’s very specific, because when the models turn the first corner on the runway, the wind catches in their hair. We have to make sure it opens it up so the cameras can get each girl’s picture.”

This season Kendal reached for a hue well outside the beige family. “Clare [Waight Keller] was saying she really wanted to incorporate violet,” the face painter noted of her discussion with the creative director. Of course, this was no in-your-face purple eye, but an iridescent lilac shade created with a mushroom-colored “greasepaint” and MAC Eye Shadow in Beautiful Iris. For a smoky effect, Kendal used a taupe sculpting cream in the “banana” of the lid and underneath the lower lashes, pulling it out into a subtle feline shape. Next, a gray-blue shimmer pencil was run across the waterline for a brightening effect. Similar to the airy chiffon dresses or cozy, oversize coats (one of which was worn by none other than Sasha Pivovarova) in the collection, the pastel palette employed on the eyes was fiercely feminine.

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde/ Indigitalimages.com

Hot Stuff, Backstage at Roberto Cavalli

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roberto-cavalliA ring of fire surrounded a pool of water in the center of the circular runway, but the collection at Roberto Cavalli wasn’t Hunger Games-inspired, although Look 36—a gown with flames rising from the hem—might have said otherwise. In fact, there was no muse at all, noted Guido Palau, who doused strands with Redken Shine Flash for a “greasy” vibe before raking them with his fingers into a chignon. He then tied off the length with elastic before personally coiling and pinning all of the models’ “messy knots” into place. The bits he pulled out in front for texture were set in place with Forceful 23 hairspray. “When it gets too overcomplicated, it doesn’t feel sexy anymore,” he said of the relatively simple style.

The makeup by Diane Kendal, however, was a bit more dramatic. The face painter crafted “smoky, extended eyes” that were squared off at the outer corners to avoid a “catty” shape. (There were plenty of felines dangling from models’ necks in pendant form, courtesy of the designer.) A combination of black and brown liners was used in order to create a sense of depth. “Black can be too hard,” Kendal explained. A champagne shadow from MAC was tapped on the center of the lids, a powder blush was rubbed into cheeks with fingertips, and lips were topped with Siss, a flesh color.

Keeping with the nude nail theme that is already quite rampant for Fall 2014, MAC senior artist Keri Blair blended two lacquers, Quiet Time (a cool, grayish hue) and Thimbleweed (a warm, peachy shade), to create a polish that flattered a range of skin tones. “It feels a little bit dirty,” she explained. “It’s a rock ‘n’ roll nude.” Standard beige clearly wouldn’t do—the Cavalli woman needs a manicure worthy of pyrotechnics.

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde; Indigitalimages.com

A Beach Day in the Midst of a Blizzard, Backstage at Proenza Schouler

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proenzaThe surfer girl reemerged backstage for Proenza Schouler’s Fall 2014 show—but not in the matte, dreaded, ocean-soaked sense. Hair pro Paul Hanlon tried that look at one of the multiple tests, but with the “acid colors” and “insane prints” it was ultimately “too much going on.” So he decided on something cleaner, but not “robotic.” Seeing as models’ strands were already doused with a considerable amount of product from a full day of shows, Hanlon misted hair with Bumble and Bumble Prep before putting in deep side parts and sweeping it behind the ears, bending the mid-lengths and ends ever so slightly over an iron. After his backstage team made each girl look perfect, Hanlon “destroyed” the style at the last minute, breaking it down with Brilliantine (a polishing cream), pulling out bits, and artfully crafting flyaways. “My fingers take the edge off, almost like they had a little hat on,” he said.

Diane Kendal provided a dewy sheen by applying moisturizer under and over any base products. The makeup pro then dabbed brown “grease” on the lids and lower lash lines before removing it with more moisturizer and a cotton swab, leaving behind a subtle residue. MAC Cremeblend Blush in Posey was tapped onto the apples of the cheeks, and lips were slicked with Siss (for girls with darker complexions) or toned down with foundation. Lashes were curled, but not coated with mascara—an aesthetic choice we’ve seen Kendal and other artists make multiple times this week. The reasoning: “Not doing mascara is more modern; as soon as you apply it, lashes look pedestrian.” I’ll consider giving my go-to tube a day off.

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde; Indigitalimages.com

Seattle Sportif, Backstage at Thakoon

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thakoon-crop“His inspiration this season was a girl from northwest America who loves Patagonia and comes to New York to shop,” said makeup artist Diane Kendal of the designer’s muse. To reflect that same “spontaneous” spirit on the face, Kendal created a reverse cat-eye using NARS Eyeliner Pencil in Mambo—starting from the middle of the lower lash line and kicking it out past the outer corners. She topped it with reddish-brown shadow from the forthcoming Dolomites Duo. “Black is typical,” Kendal said of her shade choice. “This represents that she does what she likes to do.” The rest of the complexion was just as unfussy and fresh—using highlighter on top of cheekbones and across the lids for a subtle sheen.

The hair was less about a Seattle native armed with an American Express card, and more about a girl who hits the gym. “She has beautiful hair, but she’s been sweating,” said Odile Gilbert, who prepped strands with Kérastase Spray à Porter (a volumizing spritz) to lift the roots and blasted the back with dry shampoo for a fluffy, matte texture. After making a deep side part, Lift Vertige gel was generously applied to the front sections for a “wet” effect before they were tucked behind the ears. A few pieces of length were given a similar treatment with Touche Perfection cream. “There are some elements [in the collection] that are part of the sports world,” Gilbert explained of where she found her athletic inspiration. Appropriate, seeing as the Sochi Olympics are in full swing.

Photo: Courtesy of NARS Cosmetics

Industrial Minimalism, Backstage at Alexander Wang

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alexander-wangWhen you’re Alexander Wang, you don’t bring Brooklyn to the fashion set; you bring the fashion set to Brooklyn. And when you bring the fashion set to Brooklyn, you better deliver something special—like heat-activated fabrics and a 360-degree finale composed of a dozen supers (including Karlie Kloss, Joan Smalls, Caroline Trentini, Anne V, Angela Lindvall, and Bridget Hall).

Diane Kendal and Guido Palau were tasked with creating hair and makeup that lived up to the spectacle across the river. For Kendal, that meant creating “monochrome” faces with bleached brows, light coverage foundation, a bit of contouring underneath the cheekbones and in the creases of the eyes, and a few strategic swipes of NARS Illuminator in Copacabana for sheen. “The head is very hard…so we wanted [to create] an open feel to the face—almost like mannequins,” she explained of the androgynous look.

Palau married multiple references—the sixties, futurism, comb-overs—into a lacquered style that swept across the forehead like a bang and wrapped tightly around the sides. “[The idea] was taken from an illustration that Alex had done—I wanted to do hair that was kind of drawn on,” he said. To achieve this, Palau blew strands straight using a Mason Pearson brush, made a deep side part, doused hair from roots to ends with Redken Control Addict 28 High-Control Hairspray, smoothed everything into place, and blew it dry to lock in the shape. Any remaining length was pulled into a low ponytail, which would later be concealed by cravats. The twelve models dressed in head-to-toe black (revealing vibrant shades of pink, yellow, blue, purple, and green when rotated in front of industrial vents) had their heads blasted with black powder for a seamless finish. When asked about the venue change, Palau replied, “What do I think about Brooklyn? No, it’s great.” The masses might not be in favor of crossing a bridge to get to a show, but Uber certainly enjoyed the ride.

Photo: Gianni Pucci, Indigitalimages.com