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July 25 2014

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4 posts tagged "Dr. David McDaniel"

Hello, Lasers; Goodbye, Pockmarks

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This column features weekly tips and advice from a revolving cast of industry leaders, on hand to discuss your beauty dilemmas, from blemishes to Botox. The following query was culled from a private stock, but we’ll be accepting readers’ questions soon.

Is there a specific procedure that will work for cystic acne pockmarks?

Cystic acne scars pose some real challenges for treatment. Some of these scars have a more “moon crater” appearance and actually do quite well when treated with injectable fillers. There are also laser treatments that can give excellent results when properly performed. Some have a long recovery time and require general anesthesia, but can often offer the best option. The fractional laser resurfacing method has become very popular, has very minimal downtime, and usually can be performed with just a topical numbing cream. The Fraxel Erbium YAG laser has a great safety record for skin of all colors, and the newer Fraxel CO2 laser can have even more dramatic results, but requires a bit more local anesthesia, has additional downtime, and cannot be used on some darker skin tones.

With over 20 years of clinical experience in cosmetic laser surgery and dermatology research, David H. McDaniel, MD, is board-certified by the American Board of Dermatology, an assistant professor of clinical dermatology and plastic surgery at Eastern Virginia Medical School, and the director of the Institute of Anti-Aging Research. Dr. McDaniel is also a sought-after consultant for cosmetic and drug companies regarding skincare products and cosmeceuticals.

Photo: IMAGEMORE Co.; Ltd.

Microdermabrasion: Too…Abrasive?

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This column features weekly tips and advice from a revolving cast of industry leaders, on hand to discuss your beauty dilemmas, from blemishes to Botox. The following query was culled from a private stock, but we’ll be accepting readers’ questions soon.

I’ve heard bad things recently about microdermabrasion—that people have determined it’s actually way too abrasive for the skin. Is that true—and what are better, less abrasive alternatives that provide the same exfoliating results?

If microdermabrasion is performed improperly or too aggressively or too frequently, that can pose a problem. On the other hand, John Voorhees, MD, and his research colleagues have recently shown that new collagen can be stimulated in the skin with some of the more coarse microdermabrasion methods. So I think this is a story of less can be more, but too little is not enough. The point is that a person undergoing microdermabrasion should use experienced providers who have the proper equipment and technique and who individualize treatment to each patient’s particular skin type. For home use, people should choose one of the brands that have extensive clinical studies proving efficacy. The Neutrogena At Home MicroDermabrasion System is excellent for this.

With over 20 years of clinical experience in cosmetic laser surgery and dermatology research, David H. McDaniel, MD, is board-certified by the American Board of Dermatology, an assistant professor of clinical dermatology and plastic surgery at Eastern Virginia Medical School, and the director of the Institute of Anti-Aging Research. Dr. McDaniel is also a sought-after consultant for cosmetic and drug companies regarding skincare products and cosmeceuticals.

Dr. McDaniel Says A Filler Is Not Forever

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This column features weekly tips and advice from a revolving cast of industry leaders, on hand to discuss your beauty dilemmas, from blemishes to Botox. The following query was culled from a private stock, but we’ll be accepting readers’ questions soon.

I’m interested in exploring cosmetic fillers to smooth out the increasingly visible lines and wrinkles on my face, but am hesitant to spend the money because it seems like most of them only last for six months at most. Are there any fillers that don’t get reabsorbed into your skin, for a more permanent solution—and, more importantly, if this technology exists, is it safe?

Artefill is becoming more popular for this very reason. However, there are special issues when considering using permanent fillers, such as the cosmetic surgeon’s technique and experience, because if the filler is not placed properly the results are still “permanent.” Additionally, aging of the face is a dynamic process and what may look good initially may not be ideal for the long haul—even more so if facial plastic surgery is performed and the skin is significantly “rearranged” in the future. I prefer to use some of the longer-lasting fillers such as Juvederm and Restylane, and the newer Evolence is very promising.

With over 20 years of clinical experience in cosmetic laser surgery and dermatology research, David H. McDaniel, MD [http://www.lasercenterofvirginia.com/mcdanbio.html], is board-certified by the American Board of Dermatology, an assistant professor of clinical dermatology and plastic surgery at Eastern Virginia Medical School, and the director of the Institute of Anti-Aging Research. Dr. McDaniel is also a sought-after consultant for cosmetic and drug companies regarding skincare products and cosmeceuticals.

Photo: Peter Dazeley/Getty Images

Dr. McDaniel Spells It Out, In Permanent Ink

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This column features weekly tips and advice from a revolving cast of industry leaders, on hand to discuss your beauty dilemmas, from blemishes to Botox. The following query was culled from a private stock, but we’ll be accepting readers’ questions soon.

I got a tattoo when I was “young and stupid” and am now considering laser tattoo removal. How effective is this procedure and do I have options? Is there a chance that the tattoo may still be slightly visible? What about the potential for scarring?

Laser removal of tattoos can be highly effective and safe when performed properly by an experienced laser surgeon. In the best cases, no evidence of the tattoo and no scarring will occur; this is particularly true with some of the amateur, India ink tattoos. The technique as well as the type and color of pigment used by the tattoo artist has a big impact on successful removal. Tribal art or the graphic calligraphy type of tattoos take more treatments due to the amount of ink, and certain colors—some greens, yellows, and oranges—can be very difficult to remove completely. Some types of white or brownish red tattoos can actually turn dark black with laser treatment, in which case multiple treatments are required and the time and expense can be substantial—especially for larger pieces. Also, skin of color can be more problematic to treat as some tattoo removal lasers also damage the skin pigment. There is a new ink being developed, however, called Freedom 2 , which could be revolutionary in allowing tattoos to be easily removed later in life.

With over 20 years of clinical experience in cosmetic laser surgery and dermatology research, David H. McDaniel, MD, is board-certified by the American Board of Dermatology, an assistant professor of clinical dermatology and plastic surgery at Eastern Virginia Medical School, and the director of the Institute of Anti-Aging Research. Dr. McDaniel is also a sought-after consultant for cosmetic and drug companies regarding skincare products and cosmeceuticals.

Photo: Steven Torres