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September 1 2014

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4 posts tagged "Dr. Marko Lens"

Zelens’ Wintertime Sleep Aid

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One of the main reasons we would probably never find ourselves with a permanent L.A. address is the lack of changing seasons. (Truth: The traffic is also a major deterrent.) Our bodies feel somehow off balance without that temperate shift, even when it does happen in the dramatic fashion typical of New York. But while our body clock has always functioned better with seasonal changes, our skin, most definitely has not, particularly, say, right about now. The physical effects of the arrival of cold weather have always been a bit seismic (read: hypersensitized with a semi-permanent veil of redness), so it was with great anticipation that we greeted the arrival of Zelens’ latest product designed especially with repair in mind. A superrich, concentrated formula packed with peptides, hyaluronic acid, and time-honored soothers like vitamin E, olive oil, and arnica, the new Z Recovery Intensive Repair Balm has an immediate “ah” effect on your complexion. While it may be a touch too dense for daylong wear, there is nothing more ideal than patting on a slender layer before hitting the sack. Take that, winter.

Photo: Courtesy of Zelens

Dr. Marko Lens’ Chemical Romance

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This column features weekly tips and advice from a revolving cast of industry leaders, on hand to discuss your beauty dilemmas, from blemishes to Botox. To submit a question, e-mail celia _ellenberg@fairchildfashion.

I’m ready for my first laser treatment and want to know how best to proceed as far as treating my lingering dark spots quickly, efficiently, and with the least downtime. Is Fraxel my best bet?

I am not a big fan of Fraxel as it is painful, and frankly I have not seen that it gives any better results than a standard chemical peel. It’s non-invasive and effectively removes dark spots and resurfaces the skin, but the skin really looks sunburnt for a week. Furthermore, it’s considerably more expensive than a peel. I quite like customized chemical peels that combine alpha and beta hydroxy acids together with TCA [trichloracetic acid]. The combination of acids exfoliates the skin and removes dead cells, but it also resurfaces while removing dark spots caused by hyperpigmentation. Based on the concentration of the acids that we are combine, we can determine the depth of the peel and customize it to the patient’s needs. It’s excellent and a much cheaper alternative to Fraxel.

Dr. Marko Lens is a consultant plastic and reconstructive surgeon and an internationally renowned expert in the field of skin cancer and skin aging. A fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons, Dr. Lens works out of his own private practice in London, where his extensive research into the process of skin aging led him to create Zelens, a range of advanced cosmeceuticals that utilize potent plant-derived ingredients spiked with biotechnological actives.

Photo: Getty Images archives

The Buzz On Bee Venom

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This column features weekly tips and advice from a revolving cast of industry leaders, on hand to discuss your beauty dilemmas, from blemishes to Botox. To submit a question, e-mail celia_ellenberg@fairchildfashion.com.

I’ve read a lot of articles recently about celebrities using bee venom creams to fight wrinkles without having to resort to surgery. Where does this ingredient come from, and does it work?

Bee venom (apitoxin) is produced in the abdomen of bees and it is a complex mixture of proteins. I have not seen any clinical data demonstrating [its] efficacy when used in topical formulations, [so] I will never prescribe or recommend [it] as I am very skeptical about ingredients with no efficacy data. This toxin does cause local inflammation, but there is not one clinical study confirming that bee venom is effective in erasing or reducing wrinkles.

Dr. Marko Lens is a consultant plastic and reconstructive surgeon and an internationally renowned expert in the field of skin cancer and skin aging. A fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons, Dr. Lens works out of his own private practice in London, where his extensive research into the process of skin aging led him to create Zelens, a range of advanced cosmeceuticals that utilize potent plant-derived ingredients spiked with biotechnological actives.

Retin-A Redux

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This column features weekly tips and advice from a revolving cast of industry leaders, on hand to discuss your beauty dilemmas, from blemishes to Botox. To submit a question, e-mail celia
_ellenberg@condenast.com.

A friend of mine with impeccable skin recently told me that she uses Retin-A—not for acne control but for its antiaging benefits. Is this safe—and does it work?

Retin-A (Tretinoin) is a drug commonly used for acne. However, it has been also used for the treatment of wrinkles and photo-aging. This is actually the only drug for which there has been solid evidence that it works on the molecular level. Several clinical studies showed that Retin-A can help reduce wrinkles, exfoliate the skin, and redistribute melanin, resulting in lighter skin. However, it can irritate the skin and cause redness and skin flaking, particularly in women with sensitive skin. Thus, for those with sensitive skin, other forms of topical vitamin A like retinol or retinyl palmitate are recommended. Retinol is a less potent form of vitamin A and it is found in many cosmetic products—the over-the-counter cousins of Retin-A.

Dr. Marko Lens is a consultant plastic and reconstructive surgeon and an internationally renowned expert in the field of skin cancer and skin aging. A fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons, Dr. Lens works out of his own private practice in London, where his extensive research into the process of skin aging led him to create Zelens, a range of advanced cosmeceuticals that utilize potent plant-derived ingredients spiked with biotechnological actives.

Photo: Courtesy of OrthoNeutrogena