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August 1 2014

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5 posts tagged "Dr. Suzanne Trott"

A Post-Baby Belly Like Gisele’s

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Gisele post-babyThis column features weekly tips and advice from a revolving cast of industry leaders on hand to discuss your beauty dilemmas, from blemishes to Botox.

I have persistent belly fat that I just can’t seem to lose post-baby. I used to love wearing body-conscious dresses, but now I’m self-conscious about my pouch. What can be done to get rid of it?

This is how I start the conversation when a woman comes in about her post-baby “pouch”: The abdominal wall is made up of three layers—skin, fat, and the deep abdominal wall (usually referred to as “muscle,” but the thing that is corrected here is actually the tissue connecting the muscles together, not the muscle itself). The appropriate procedure for you depends on which layer it is that needs adjustment, and can range from a small amount of liposuction under local anesthesia to a full tummy tuck (abdominoplasty). Continue Reading “A Post-Baby Belly Like Gisele’s” »

Help, My Man Has Love Handles

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Dr Is InThis column features weekly tips and advice from a revolving cast of industry leaders on hand to discuss your beauty dilemmas, from blemishes to Botox.

My husband has lost about fifteen pounds over the last year, but his love handles don’t seem to be going anywhere. He often talks about smart lipo, but I’ve read that the fat comes back—that it migrates from other parts of the body. Is that as true for men as it is for women? Do men and women achieve the same kind of results from the treatment?

First of all, my husband is skinny and narrow up and down like a ferret and has those same love handles. Almost every man, unless he is a professional athlete or has incredible genetics and spends all of his free time working out, starts to develop fat deposits, or “lipodystrophy,” on his lower abdomen and flanks (or “love handles”) once he hits his early thirties. Those of us who are otherwise fit and just have one or two specific, offending areas are actually the best candidates for liposuction.

However, the term smart lipo needs to be defined. Smart Lipo is a laser that was falsely advertised through media and marketing, and became equivalent in the consumers’ eyes with “liposuction under local anesthetic.” When patients come in asking for smart lipo, what they usually mean is that they want the fat removed with a simple, minimally invasive office procedure without any general anesthesia. There is no such thing. The truth is that the Smart Lipo laser alone does very little for the removal of fat. I know this because I have one in my office and always have to combine it with conventional liposuction to get any kind of result. This can be done under either local (the “tumescent” technique), IV sedation, or general anesthesia. The bottom line is that liposuction requires the removal of fat with a suction cannula. The Smart Lipo laser can be added for possible skin tightening, but even this has not been proven.

After the removal of fat cells by liposuction, the fat cannot “migrate” to other parts of the body. Once the fat is gone, it’s gone, and it can stay gone—as long as you take care of yourself. Usually what I tell my patients is that to keep their fantastic results, they need to kick it up a notch with diet and exercise. If you get lazy once the fat you couldn’t get rid of is gone, you can gain weight back. But fat cells don’t multiply—they just get bigger. What I’ve found is that the fat will start to come back a little in the areas from where it was removed, and then once those remaining fat cells are “full,” they will start filling up elsewhere.

In good candidates, liposuction is a safe, effective procedure that works equally well for both men and women.

Located in Beverly Hills, Dr. Suzanne Trott is a board-certified plastic surgeon who specializes in breast and body contouring. Her areas of expertise include liposuction and the new “natural breast augmentation” procedure with autologous body fat. She answers your questions on her blog, Lipo Queen, an international resource for unbiased information regarding all of the newest developments in plastic surgery and cosmetic medicine. Her book, Lipo Queen will be available next year. Further information about Dr. Trott and her practice can be found at Drtrott.com.

In Need of a Lift?

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woman-breasts-B-cupThis column features weekly tips and advice from a revolving cast of industry leaders on hand to discuss your beauty dilemmas, from blemishes to Botox.

I was barely a B cup, then I breast-fed my baby. I wish my breasts were fuller, but I hate the unnatural plastic look of boob jobs. What kind of results can I expect from a breast-lift? Or injecting fat from other parts of my body? Do the results look natural? Breast augmentation gets a bad rap, because the only ones that everyone knows about are the ones that look fake. Many women are walking around with implants that appear natural. However, the term natural has to be defined. Once you hit your late twenties, and especially after breast-feeding, true natural usually means the start of sagging and lack of fullness on the top part of the breast, or what is referred to as upper pole fullness.

When someone in your situation asks to look natural, she usually means she wants me to make her breasts in proportion to her body habitus (or body type), and to give her some upper pole fullness, making her look like she’s wearing a padded bra when she’s really not. This can be done with an implant, as long as the implant is not too big for the dimensions of the breast. For someone like you, who has breast-fed, you usually have some looseness of the breast skin that allows space for a small implant to sit nicely, without looking like a round ball stuck on your chest.

At a small B cup, a breast-lift alone will require at least a scar around your nipple, or a “lollipop” incision, and will not give you the upper pole fullness you are probably looking for. If you absolutely do not want an implant (and you have the fat to spare), fat transfer with or without a lift could be a great option.

The fat transfer looks and feels completely natural and requires no incisions on the breasts. The only real downside is that you cannot guarantee exactly how much of the fat will stay permanently, so if you have your heart set on being a certain size, this is not a good choice for you. I tell my patients that we should know their final cup size at three months after the procedure. The biggest bonuses are that not only is it two procedures in one, but since your body fat has been redistributed, if you gain weight later, it will disproportionately go to your breasts!

Located in Beverly Hills, Dr. Suzanne Trott is a board-certified plastic surgeon who specializes in breast and body contouring. Her areas of expertise include liposuction and the new “natural breast augmentation” procedure with autologous body fat. She answers your questions on her blog, Lipo Queen, an international resource for unbiased information regarding all of the newest developments in plastic surgery and cosmetic medicine. Her book, Lipo Queen will be available next year. Further information about Dr. Trott and her practice can be found at Drtrott.com.

Are Your Lips Ready for Their Close-up?

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jennifer-aniston-and-jennifer-lopez-glamour-awards-2011This column features weekly tips and advice from a revolving cast of industry leaders on hand to discuss your beauty dilemmas, from blemishes to Botox.

I’m considering lip enhancement, but I don’t want my pout to look too inflated. What do I need to know before I do it? Avoiding “duck lips” just requires that you and your doctor are aware of the basics of lip aesthetics: 1. Youthful lips are only full centrally, not all over. Compare a newborn baby’s lips to the lips of a Real Housewife.

2. In natural, or at least natural-looking full lips, the bottom lip is always bigger than the top lip.

3. Our lips lengthen and sag as we age. It is youthful to have a short upper lip, or “upper teeth show,” as opposed to having a longer upper lip, where there is just “lower teeth show.” The “length” of your upper lip is the distance from the bottom of your nose to the bottom of your upper lip. Regardless of age, some women genetically have shorter/longer lips than others. For instance, look at this picture of the two Jennifers. They are approximately the same age, and both are stunning women, but notice how Lopez’s upper lip is almost half the length of Aniston’s. They would respond very differently to lip injections.

If you have a long upper lip, you are at a higher risk for getting duck lips from an injection, because the lip will get longer and more dragged down by the filler. Make sure the amount put in the upper lip is minimal, and see if the doctor can just inject it in the vermilion (the red part). I have found that staying away from the vermilion border (the lip line) is key to avoiding the duck lips look in my patients with longer upper lips.

No matter how conservative you and your doctor are with your first filler session, you are undoubtedly going to have some swelling. Things you can do to prevent this include: Sleep with your head elevated and ice as much as you can—especially when you wake up in the morning. And try not to take any aspirin or ibuprofen products for at least ten days before injection to help stave off bruising. Hyaluronic acids absorb water, so stay away from salty foods and try to drink water with lemon (a natural diuretic). In the lips, I only use the thinner hyaluronic acids (Restylane and Juvéderm Ultra, as opposed to Perlane and Juvéderm Ultra Plus), because they create less swelling.

You can reassess your result with your physician at two weeks. If you’ve been super conservative, chances are that once the swelling goes down you are going to want a little more. It’s a slippery slope…

Located in Beverly Hills, Dr. Suzanne Trott is a board-certified plastic surgeon who specializes in breast and body contouring. Her areas of expertise include liposuction and the new “natural breast augmentation” procedure with autologous body fat. She answers your questions on her blog, Lipo Queen, an international resource for unbiased information regarding all of the newest developments in plastic surgery and cosmetic medicine. Her book, Lipo Queen, will be available next year. Further information about Dr. Trott and her practice can be found at Drtrott.com.

Dr. Suzanne Trott on the Do’s and Don’ts of Fillers

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woman-with-glowing-skinThis column features weekly tips and advice from a revolving cast of industry leaders on hand to discuss your beauty dilemmas, from blemishes to Botox.

What should I consider before trying fillers, and how do I determine what’s right for me?

First off, as a filler “virgin” you need to make sure that the person doing it—whether it is a plastic surgeon, dermatologist, or nurse-practitioner—is on the same page as you in terms of aesthetic ideal. If their own face has that alien blowfish look and that’s not what you’re aiming for, you should probably go elsewhere.

Second, when it comes to fillers—which can be amazing!—usually less is more. Start small. Some of the fillers come in half-syringes so you don’t have to buy as much at one time. And start with a hyaluronic acid that is reversible, like Juvederm, Restylane, or Perlane. As with collagen, hyaluronic acid is a natural building block of the skin. It dissolves over time, and it usually lasts about four months in the lower face, while in the upper face it can last years. However, if you don’t like how it looks, it can be dissolved and removed with a hyaluronidase injection. So there’s no reason to be afraid.

Oftentimes my patients feel that their faces need refreshing, but they can’t pinpoint what’s bothering them. This is where you need to trust your doctor. The areas that can be dramatically improved with a small amount of filler volume are under the eyes (tear troughs) and upper cheeks. But sometimes it’s about balance. The lines from your nose to the corners of your mouth (nasolabial folds) and jowls can be softened, but you should be conservative in the lower face.

Located in Beverly Hills, Dr. Suzanne Trott is a board-certified plastic surgeon who specializes in breast and body contouring. Her areas of expertise include liposuction and the new “natural breast augmentation” procedure with autologous body fat. She answers your questions on her blog, Lipo Queen, an international resource for unbiased information regarding all of the newest developments in plastic surgery and cosmetic medicine. Her book, Lipo Queen will be available next year. Further information about Dr. Trott and her practice can be found at Drtrott.com.