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September 1 2014

styledotcom Models share their fashion month beauty must-haves: stylem.ag/1qNo4R1 pic.twitter.com/WJg47cbpWZ

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4 posts tagged "Fall 2010"

The Quintessential Chloé Girl, Back For Fall

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“Lush, sexy, free, bouncy, and enviable” is how hairstylist Guido Palau described the hair at Chloé yesterday. The gorgeous style with a certain luxury to it has become synonymous with the brand at this point, as anyone who lusted after those unforgettable Raquel Zimmermann-fronted ad images from its Spring 2007 campaign will tell you. Zimmermann, who opened and closed yesterday’s show, was on hand backstage, where Palau and his team prepped her hair with Redken’s Velvet Gelatine cushioning blow-dry gel, drying it with a round brush and setting it with curlers before letting the part fall where it lay. To complement the perfect blowout, Charlotte Tilbury turned to what she referred to as the perfect makeup, which meant a face that is “a lot more luxurious and finished.” “It’s about eyes and lips, even if the lips are neutral and sheer,” Tilbury explained. To wit, she kept the skin very healthy using a palette of caramel and toffee hues with a touch of bronze on the cheekbones. A smoky gray “panda eye” that harked back to the late seventies/early eighties provided what she described as a “glossy, very French, and very high-maintenance” look in homage to the French actresses Dominique Sanda and Carole Bouquet, who served as inspiration backstage. The final touch came from two different MAC lipsticks in Freckle Tone and Underplay, which Tilbury made darker toward the center of models’ lips to give the look of fullness.

Photo: Greg Kessler / FirstView.com

At Chanel, Peter Philips Paints It Black

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Peter Philips, Chanel’s creative director of makeup, has a knack for pulling out specific elements of Karl Lagerfeld’s sartorial vision and reinterpreting them in beauty terms. Who could forget Philips’ ivory-coated lash lines and pearl-tipped fingers to complement the house’s all-white Spring ’09 Couture show, or his jade nail from Fall ’09, a shade that was plucked directly from the similarly colored tweeds and accessories that Lagerfeld sent down the runway? For Fall ’10, Philips was at it again, although this time, he focused his attention solely on the eyes. “I kind of re-created a paint/print texture that Karl used in some of the handbag and shoe designs for the show,” Philips said yesterday backstage at the Grand Palais, where he was crafting an elongated, oblong shape on lids with tiny brushstrokes of La Ligne de Chanel in Noir Lamé placed on top of a sparkly taupe pigment from Enigma, a new eye shadow quad that will be part of Philips’ fall color collection. In addition to having a steady hand to get that perfectly haphazard liner application, Philips recommends applying the eye shadow wet to amp up its intensity. Otherwise, skin was kept clean and fresh, lips were nude, and cheeks were given a slight contouring with a lovely new shade of Joues Contraste Blush in Pink Cloud, which imparts an ever-so-slight luminescent flush. For you fellow nail junkies out there waiting to see what Philips would come up with next, he gave his limited-edition Jade Rose—a subdued pink color that was released last fall but was overshadowed by its pure green counterpart—a second go-around this season, which means you’ll have another chance to get your hands on it when it bows this summer, if you missed out on the opportunity last year.

Photo: Luca Cannonieri / GoRunway.com; Gianni Pucci / GoRunway.com

Beautiful Conformity Backstage at Lanvin

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This weekend proved to be an exciting one at the Paris shows, chock-full of beauty heroics that started at Lanvin on Friday, where black wigs à la Uma Thurman’s mop top in Pulp Fiction took center stage. “The thing about a wig is that it completely transforms the girl. It’s a total fantasy,” hairstylist Guido Palau posited backstage. “They look like tough, dominatrix-y bourgeois Frenchwomen, with a nice little cartoonishness to it.” Palau talked with Alber Elbaz about a host of inspirations for the show’s coifs, including manga, but ultimately waited on the word from the designer to proceed. “Alber is brave, because he said, Let’s just go for it.” The rationale behind his decision? “We live in a time when everyone really wants to look alike, so in that sense I am just holding up a mirror,” Elbaz told Style.com before the show. To give each girl a uniform, glossy look, Palau simply steamed the $39 vinyl wigs he hand-carried to Paris from Ricky’s in New York City. (If you want to get a similar sleekness at home, he recommends a few spritzes of Redken’s Vinyl Glam for extra sheen). Makeup artist Pat McGrath echoed Elbaz’s desire for homogeny with a strong eye and a beige lip. “It’s all about them looking the same, very malachite,” McGrath said, creating a base with CoverGirl Simply Ageless foundation and then applying a custom-made nude lip and a theatrical “aged gold” eye, which she achieved using Cover Girl LiquidLine Blast black eyeliner and a mix of metallic pigments for “flashes of eyes” as the girls walked the runway. Conformity never looked so good.

Photo: Greg Kessler / FirstView.com

Backstage At Dries, The Best Kind Of Minimalism

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With the Paris shows officially under way, our one burning beauty question has been answered: Yes, nineties minimalism has in fact made the trip from Milan, where it was a carryover effect from both London and New York. Despite a few dips into sixties hair territory at Rochas and Giles yesterday, barefaced looks reigned at Nicolas Andreas Taralis and Limi Feu—not to mention Dries Van Noten, where makeup artist Peter Philips has perfected the no-frills face over the past few seasons. But leave it to Philips to stake his claim on the familiar territory for Fall by adding a dash of extraordinary to what has become a general trend toward the ordinary. Like Linda Cantello at Armani, Philips chose to make his statement with the brow, adding an extra element to an otherwise plain approach by penciling in a sharp, short black line and blending it seamlessly into the natural curvature of models’ arches. You could barely see the precision of his handiwork on the runway, where the additional step served to bring a subtle strength to the face, without detracting from the clothes. And that’s what’s great about Philips’ work: Even his simplest ideas have impact.

Photo: Don Ashby & Olivier Claisse / FirstView.com