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April 19 2014

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222 posts tagged "Guido Palau"

Story Time With Pat McGrath and Guido Palau: The Look at Dolce & Gabbana Fall 2014

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“Once upon a time in Sicily…” read the invite to Dolce & Gabbana, and the clothes, many of which were accented with woodland creature-inspired appliqués, followed the fairy tale theme. A skeleton key motif was also threaded throughout several pieces in the collection, almost as if to say the doors to the designer’s secret winter garden had been unlocked. Backstage—a clandestine world all its own—the heroes of hair and makeup, Guido Palau and Pat McGrath, were hard at work crafting an “enchanted” look to match the storybook-worthy set. Gather round as the dynamic duo tell their captivating beauty tale:

Life Is a Fairy Tale, Backstage at Dolce & Gabbana

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dolce“It’s always about the beauty of the eyeliner—everything begins there,” explained Pat McGrath of the soft black flicks she created today. The designer’s favorite Italian film icons, Sophia Loren and Monica Bellucci, once again served as inspiration, but in lieu of the heated Mediterranean woman, a more enchanted spirit was embraced. As The Nutcracker Suite played and snow softly cascaded down over the barren almond blossom trees (seen in full bloom this past Spring) at one end of the runway, a softer, more “fairy tale and woodland” look emerged onto the catwalk.

To bring models’ features forward and achieve that “lit-from-within” glow, McGrath used two tones of Dolce & Gabbana’s Perfect Liquid Luminous Foundation—one to match the complexion, and a paler hue on the high planes of the face. Cheeks were lightly dusted with Blush in Nude. Being the main focus, eyes were rimmed with Crayon Intense in Black, then layered with Glam Liner, a liquid formula, to intensify the winged shape. The lower lashes were given the same treatment, but the majority of the pigment was wiped away with a cotton bud, leaving only a trace of color for definition. A new launch from the brand, Perfect Mono Cream Eye Colour (on shelves this Fall), was washed across the lids—Cocoa in the socket and Innocence, a pearly white, in the center and on the brow bone. (Innocence was also mixed with Gold Dust and tapped onto the cheekbones to highlight). After using a nude pencil on the water line, two tubes of mascara were pulled out to polish everything off—Intenseyes Mascara in Black Intense on top and Passioneyes in Terra, a brown shade, on the bottom—to sweep lashes up and out. Using just her fingertips, McGrath pressed Classic Cream Lipstick in Honey onto models’ mouths before dabbing a clear gloss in the center. “Stefano and Domenico spoke about the fact that they don’t want the gloss on the top of the lips because it can look really old-fashioned,” she noted.

The hair was put up in “a classic Dolce manner,” explained Guido Palau—meaning a “sensitive” style swept off the neck and face, but not “snatched back and hard.” This season, strands were prepped with Redken Body Full, a thickening spray, to create “guts and a little bit of friction,” then misted generously with Pillow Proof Two Day Extender, a dry shampoo, for texture. The length was loosely braided and coiled into a low chignon; tendrils and “floaty bits” were pulled out to frame the face. “I think they’ve really defined their woman, the boys, and it’s something that’s very successful for them,” noted Palau. The one thing they did change up this season: The elaborate hair accessories were swapped out for chain mail-like hats encrusted with crystals or sequins. After all, what fairy tale would be complete without a knight in shining armor?

Photo: Courtesy of Dolce & Gabbana

Seamless Continuity, Backstage at Jil Sander

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jilsanderThree words both Pat McGrath and Guido Palau used to describe the hair and makeup at Jil Sander: “Very, very natural.” Both artists let each model’s character take center stage instead of creating an entirely new persona. McGrath lightly contoured lids with a taupe shadow, brows were groomed, and lips were layered with balm. “Simply beautiful,” she said of the finished face.

Palau staked his claim on the two sinks backstage, using them to wash each girl’s hair with Redken Hair Cleansing Cream Shampoo. Strands were left to air-dry before they were spritzed with Pillow Proof Two Day Extender, a dry shampoo, for additional texture. Despite the designer departing her eponymous label for the third time, the house’s signature look holds strong.

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde; Indigitalimages.com

Hot Stuff, Backstage at Roberto Cavalli

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roberto-cavalliA ring of fire surrounded a pool of water in the center of the circular runway, but the collection at Roberto Cavalli wasn’t Hunger Games-inspired, although Look 36—a gown with flames rising from the hem—might have said otherwise. In fact, there was no muse at all, noted Guido Palau, who doused strands with Redken Shine Flash for a “greasy” vibe before raking them with his fingers into a chignon. He then tied off the length with elastic before personally coiling and pinning all of the models’ “messy knots” into place. The bits he pulled out in front for texture were set in place with Forceful 23 hairspray. “When it gets too overcomplicated, it doesn’t feel sexy anymore,” he said of the relatively simple style.

The makeup by Diane Kendal, however, was a bit more dramatic. The face painter crafted “smoky, extended eyes” that were squared off at the outer corners to avoid a “catty” shape. (There were plenty of felines dangling from models’ necks in pendant form, courtesy of the designer.) A combination of black and brown liners was used in order to create a sense of depth. “Black can be too hard,” Kendal explained. A champagne shadow from MAC was tapped on the center of the lids, a powder blush was rubbed into cheeks with fingertips, and lips were topped with Siss, a flesh color.

Keeping with the nude nail theme that is already quite rampant for Fall 2014, MAC senior artist Keri Blair blended two lacquers, Quiet Time (a cool, grayish hue) and Thimbleweed (a warm, peachy shade), to create a polish that flattered a range of skin tones. “It feels a little bit dirty,” she explained. “It’s a rock ‘n’ roll nude.” Standard beige clearly wouldn’t do—the Cavalli woman needs a manicure worthy of pyrotechnics.

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde; Indigitalimages.com

Horsing Around, Backstage at Bottega Veneta

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bottegaPlaying off the graphic lines in the collection, hair pro Guido Palau crafted a classic pony. The twist? “They’re made of hair extensions, like a big horse’s tail, and cut very blunt,” he explained. Inspired by nineties minimalism, Palau kept things “sharp” instead of “soft and natural”—an aesthetic the house has stuck with the past few seasons. To get strands super-straight, he used Redken Align 12 to blow-dry hair smooth before it was flat-ironed. Palau then gathered the length at the back of the head, tied it off with a piece of elastic, and wrapped the tail with extensions for thickness—hiding the band with a small section of hair to complete the ultra-clean look.

“It’s not natural, undone nothing [makeup]; it’s natural, but, beautiful and polished,” Pat McGrath noted. For a “fresh” contour, she employed a taupe-y rose blush in lieu of a harsh bronzer. Lids were softly shaped with a beige shadow and brows were simply groomed to finish.

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