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July 24 2014

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226 posts tagged "Guido Palau"

The “Glorified Comb-Over,” Take Three

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With so many fashion shows each season in New York, London, Milan, and Paris, we frequently see repeat appearances in the hair department. Chignons, twists, ponytails, and partings pop up with regularity, but these recurrences are slightly more noticeable when it’s the more avant-garde efforts that get a second or third go-around, as is the case with hairstylist Guido Palau’s glorified comb-over. The slicked-to-one-side, matted-down look premiered at Alexander Wang’s Fall 2010 show, and then Palau reprised it the same season at Bottega Veneta—a double take we noted on this blog. It’s because of our acute awareness of said style that it was hard to miss yesterday at Diesel Black Gold. There, with his trusty bottles of Redken 16 Hardwear Super Strong Gel and Forceful 23 Finishing Spray to work with, Palau went for it again. What do you think: Third time’s a charm, or was once enough?

Photo: Clockwise from left, Yannis Vlamos / GoRunway.com at Diesel Black Gold; Don Ashby / FirstView.com at Alexander Wang; Don Ashby & Olivier Claisse / FirstView.com at Bottega Veneta

Blushing Breck Girls, Backstage At Marc By Marc

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“It’s the right kind of nothing,” face painter Dick Page quipped backstage at Marc by Marc Jacobs, where, at first glance, it appeared as though models were wearing no makeup at all. While Page isn’t usually inclined to perform facial massages as part of his pre-show routine, he made an exception here, as the relatively uncomplicated look allotted him a bit more room for extras. “It’s a tradeoff of luxury versus time,” he said as he rubbed Shiseido’s über-rich Future Solution LX Total Regenerating Cream into models’ parched skin—”it feels like bank,” Page said, describing the emollient salve’s opulent texture. On top he applied concealer and foundation if and when they were needed, devoting most of his attention to a custom flush that he and he alone applied to individual models using a mix of Shiseido Luminizing Satin Face Color in Petal (RD103), Orchid (RD401), Carnation (PK304), and Tea Rose (RS302) as well as its highlighters in High Beam White (WT905) and Soft Beam Gold (BE206). “I ask the girls to smile,” Page said of his precise pigment application, in which he dusts the top of the cheeks and the bridge of the nose. “It has to hit in here,” he said, pointing to the narrow area between the eyes that most people tend to ignore when playing with a pink cheek. “It corrects the concealer application and is how you naturally get sun,” he pointed out. As for the hair, Guido Palau created a softer, younger, less kinky style than the dominatrix ponytails he whipped up for Jacobs’ main collection. “It’s uncharacteristic,” Palau said of the “bouncy, Breck girl gorgeous hair” he designed for the occasion. “It’s nicer than the gritty style you usually see here,” he added, prepping strands with Redken’s Velvet Gelatine Cushioning Blow-Dry Gel, applying heat, and setting sections in large curlers for volume. It’s also much simpler than, say, the rick-racked, soft mass of seventies curls Jacobs requested for Spring.

Photo: Luca Cannonieri / GoRunway.com

Graphic Dominatrix Meets Eccentric Grandma, Backstage At Marc Jacobs

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Chinstraps. The odd accoutrement appeared for the first time this season backstage at Victoria Beckham and we paid it no mind as a potential recurring fashion-meets-beauty theme for Fall. But there it was again at Marc Jacobs, anchoring small berets set atop sleek ponytails. “Dominatrix ponytails,” Redken creative consultant Guido Palau clarified of the graphic up-dos that were prepped with Redken’s Blown Away 09 Blow Dry Gel, dried, and flat-ironed, before being secured with a hair-wrapped elastic and a spritz of its forthcoming Shine Flash 02 Glistening Mist. “The chinstraps bring in a forties illustration effect,” Palau said—that almost cartoonish quality in which not one hair is out of place. “It’s the perversion of convention,” he continued of the classic, girl-next-door style that had been given a “severe” makeover for Jacobs’ barrage of rubber and fake fur. With hair removed from models’ faces, makeup maestro François Nars was given free-reign to pronouncedly paint them. “It’s like a grandmother whose a bit eccentric that puts on too much blush and her eyeliner wrong,” Nars quipped of his “droopy” liner job, drawn downward on the top lash line with his new for Fall Larger Than Life Longwear Eyeliner in Via Venetto, a dark black. Models were also given a heavy flush low on the cheeks courtesy of Nars’ Cream Blush in Lokoune, which he finger-blended to resemble the rouge in “old 18th century paintings.” Lids were dusted with the red shade from his forthcoming Eyeshadow Duo in Grand Palais for depth and lashes were treated to multiple slashings of Nars’ Larger Than Life Volumizing mascara to complete a look that he described as “a little decadent and a little bit off.” It was a spot-on beauty mix for a collection that had lace and latex in equal measure.

Photo: Luca Cannonieri / GoRunway.com

Space-Age Simplicity Backstage at Victoria Beckham

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Editors and buyers who arrived at the Upper East Side townhouse Victoria Beckham takes over for her presentation each season expecting to see her typical brand of perfect skin and sleek hair were in for a shock. Each and every model wore a meticulously placed stocking cap and headbands. “I didn’t want it to have a connotation to anyone or anything,” Redken creative consultant Guido Palau said of the look, ultimately admitting that it did kind of resemble a 1920s silent film star-era skull cap. But if you think getting the same, perfectly uniform silhouette on all 15 models was as simple as snapping on a black nylon beanie and calling it a day, think again. It required saturating strands with Redken’s 16 Hardwear Super Strong Gel, wrapping them in a circular motion and employing one of the coolest, old-school beauty techniques we’ve seen in a while: “It’s like a face lift,” Palau said, tightly braiding two sections of hair right above the ear, pulling them taught to raise the outer corners of the eyes just so, and affixing them to the top of his twisted updos. Then came the wig caps, which were pinned flat at the nape of models’ necks and draped with two black American Apparel headbands, one positioned as a chinstrap and the other placed on top around the hairline. “It immediately brings the focus to the clothes and the face,” Palau said.


Speaking of, faces were being attended to by Charlotte Tilbury. The flame-haired makeup artist used Lancôme’s Teint Miracle foundation topped off with its Éclat Miracle illuminator, which she dabbed along cheekbones, down the nose, and on the cupid’s bow of models’ mouths to reflect light. To get a more “glow-y, space age-y” feel, Tilbury dusted the gold powder from Lancôme’s Color Design 5 Pan Eyeshadow Palette in Jade Fever on the tops of cheekbones and brushed its new-for-Fall Star Bronzer around the hairline. Eyes were treated to the bronze, charcoal, champagne, and pewter shimmer pigments from the French brand’s Color Design 5 Pan Eyeshadow Palette in Taupe Craze and brows were left natural, brushed up and set with Lancôme’s clear brow gel. Tilbury left lips nude, moisturized and toned-down with a mix of its La Base balm and concealer, although there was a point during the hair and makeup tests when pouts were supposed to be painted bright orange. Just think: we could be talking about a Victoria Beckham-designed Pout-a-Porter bullet right now! Another time, we hope.

The Downtown Cool Girl Returns Backstage At Alexander Wang

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“He’s going back to his roots,” Redken creative consultant Guido Palau said of Alexander Wang at the designer’s show yesterday. Gone was the high-concept, Jean-Michel Basquiat-inspired clay-dipped knots Palau treated us to for Spring; in their place, piecey strands with a “messy” middle part that he prepped with Redken’s Sculpture Wax, incorporating a slight bend for texture with Sultra’s Playmate curling iron before gathering the back into a loose, low ponytail. Adding an admirable set of “boyish brows” to the equation by filling in arches with a mix of MAC Eye Shadow in Brun, a warm coffee, and Carbon, a deep black, makeup artist Diane Kendal also harked back to Wang’s early days. “We tried bleached brows and a heavy smoky eye,” she said, “but decided the collection had a cooler edge with the bare face and stronger brow.” Hammering home said edge were eyes lined with MAC Eye Pencil in Smoulder jostled with a Q-tip to create a worn-in look. Butter London’s Nonie Crème was also on hand to paint on an update of the traditional “Alexander Wang nail.” “It’s the hypothermic version,” Crème said of the custom mix of her Hardwear top coat, Union Jack Black, and a single drop of Royal Navy for a sheer veil of gray polish that she topped off with her Nail Foundation for a flat finish. It was classic Wang—and all the better for it.

Photo: Luca Cannonieri / GoRunway.com