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August 23 2014

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228 posts tagged "Guido Palau"

Schoolgirls Come Out To Play, Backstage At Prada

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Day three of the Milan shows is in the books. The overlying trend we’re noticing thus far? Fur, obviously. The other? The sixties. First came the spider lashes and teased sets at Alberta Ferretti, and yesterday Miuccia Prada got on board with her own tribute to the decade’s childlike, ingenuous glamour, Mary Janes-cum-knee-high boots included. “It’s very girly, very young, exuding innocent sophistication,” Redken creative consultant Guido Palau said of the segmented ponytails he fashioned for the occasion with a nod to Catherine Deneuve in her Belle de Jour days. Creating two separate parts at the brow level, Palau finger-combed his newly formed top section, coating it with Redken’s Forceful 23 hair spray for hold and texture. Pulling out small pieces above the ears to hang separate from the rest of the hair, Palau gathered the lengths into a low ponytail, adding more hair spray and back-combing for additional texture before securing the look together with a long silver Goody barrette, a point of difference from the similar schoolgirl silhouette Orlando Pita whipped up at Derek Lam.

“Wide-eyed innocence” is how makeup artist Pat McGrath described the directive from Mrs. Prada, which gave her an interesting idea as far as the best way to draw attention to models’ peepers. Bucking her tendency to bleach arches once she touches down in Europe, McGrath filled in brows to directly correlate with the exact shade of models’ hair, establishing fluidity. Then she set to work creating a paled-out complexion to which she applied a single product: blush. A rosy hue not only graced cheeks, drawn outward toward the temple for a natural playing-in-the-schoolyard flush, but the pink pigment was also dusted across lids from the lash line to the brow bone and placed on top of toned-down lips to complete the natural, “I’m not interested in heavy makeup—yet” vibe. It was a departure from the highly stylized backstage looks we typically see here (opaque chrome eye shadow and thick, horizontal brows, anyone?) but refreshing as a result.

Photo: Luca Cannonieri / GoRunway.com

Swing On: The Sixties Trump The Seventies Backstage At Alberta Ferretti

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“Almost Twiggylike but with a boyish feel” is how hairstylist Guido Palau described the sleek, swooping chignons he constructed at Alberta Ferretti yesterday. Prepping hair with Redken’s Velvet Gelatine 07 Cushioning Blow-Dry Gel, Palau carved out deep side parts and coated sections in Redken’s Quick Dry 18 Instant Finishing Spray before softly teasing to create “Bardot-like” height and texture in the back. His next move was to pull models’ manes into low-lying ponytails, which he twisted into buns and secured with bobby pins to hold. A good helping of Redken’s forthcoming Shine Flash 02 Glistening Mist slathered onto the surface of the style provided that expertly molded, shiny effect.

The Queen of Carnaby Street was also well represented in Lucia Pieroni’s sixties makeup, which featured one of the era’s lasting beauty trends, spider lashes—which, it should be noted, seem poised for a resurgence for Fall 2011. (They’ve already been spotted this week at Gucci.) Leaving skin bare, save for a dusting of MAC Prep + Prime Finishing Powder and its Select Moisturecover Concealer where needed, Pieroni applied its Sculpt & Shape Powder in Sculpt along cheekbones for a highlighted sheen. Eyes were treated to a slick of MAC Paintpot in Groundwork, a dark taupe, for an exaggerated natural look, which Pieroni amped up using MAC Eyeliner in Coffee along the outer corners of both lash lines and multiple swipes of its Zoom Lash Mascara on both top and bottom lashes. To finish the look, Pieroni painted lips a shade of creamy nude/pink using MAC Lipstick in Snob. It was simple, subtle, yet somehow totally affecting—and ripe for at-home duplication.

Photo: Matt Lever / Courtesy of Redken

The “Glorified Comb-Over,” Take Three

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With so many fashion shows each season in New York, London, Milan, and Paris, we frequently see repeat appearances in the hair department. Chignons, twists, ponytails, and partings pop up with regularity, but these recurrences are slightly more noticeable when it’s the more avant-garde efforts that get a second or third go-around, as is the case with hairstylist Guido Palau’s glorified comb-over. The slicked-to-one-side, matted-down look premiered at Alexander Wang’s Fall 2010 show, and then Palau reprised it the same season at Bottega Veneta—a double take we noted on this blog. It’s because of our acute awareness of said style that it was hard to miss yesterday at Diesel Black Gold. There, with his trusty bottles of Redken 16 Hardwear Super Strong Gel and Forceful 23 Finishing Spray to work with, Palau went for it again. What do you think: Third time’s a charm, or was once enough?

Photo: Clockwise from left, Yannis Vlamos / GoRunway.com at Diesel Black Gold; Don Ashby / FirstView.com at Alexander Wang; Don Ashby & Olivier Claisse / FirstView.com at Bottega Veneta

Blushing Breck Girls, Backstage At Marc By Marc

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“It’s the right kind of nothing,” face painter Dick Page quipped backstage at Marc by Marc Jacobs, where, at first glance, it appeared as though models were wearing no makeup at all. While Page isn’t usually inclined to perform facial massages as part of his pre-show routine, he made an exception here, as the relatively uncomplicated look allotted him a bit more room for extras. “It’s a tradeoff of luxury versus time,” he said as he rubbed Shiseido’s über-rich Future Solution LX Total Regenerating Cream into models’ parched skin—”it feels like bank,” Page said, describing the emollient salve’s opulent texture. On top he applied concealer and foundation if and when they were needed, devoting most of his attention to a custom flush that he and he alone applied to individual models using a mix of Shiseido Luminizing Satin Face Color in Petal (RD103), Orchid (RD401), Carnation (PK304), and Tea Rose (RS302) as well as its highlighters in High Beam White (WT905) and Soft Beam Gold (BE206). “I ask the girls to smile,” Page said of his precise pigment application, in which he dusts the top of the cheeks and the bridge of the nose. “It has to hit in here,” he said, pointing to the narrow area between the eyes that most people tend to ignore when playing with a pink cheek. “It corrects the concealer application and is how you naturally get sun,” he pointed out. As for the hair, Guido Palau created a softer, younger, less kinky style than the dominatrix ponytails he whipped up for Jacobs’ main collection. “It’s uncharacteristic,” Palau said of the “bouncy, Breck girl gorgeous hair” he designed for the occasion. “It’s nicer than the gritty style you usually see here,” he added, prepping strands with Redken’s Velvet Gelatine Cushioning Blow-Dry Gel, applying heat, and setting sections in large curlers for volume. It’s also much simpler than, say, the rick-racked, soft mass of seventies curls Jacobs requested for Spring.

Photo: Luca Cannonieri / GoRunway.com

Graphic Dominatrix Meets Eccentric Grandma, Backstage At Marc Jacobs

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Chinstraps. The odd accoutrement appeared for the first time this season backstage at Victoria Beckham and we paid it no mind as a potential recurring fashion-meets-beauty theme for Fall. But there it was again at Marc Jacobs, anchoring small berets set atop sleek ponytails. “Dominatrix ponytails,” Redken creative consultant Guido Palau clarified of the graphic up-dos that were prepped with Redken’s Blown Away 09 Blow Dry Gel, dried, and flat-ironed, before being secured with a hair-wrapped elastic and a spritz of its forthcoming Shine Flash 02 Glistening Mist. “The chinstraps bring in a forties illustration effect,” Palau said—that almost cartoonish quality in which not one hair is out of place. “It’s the perversion of convention,” he continued of the classic, girl-next-door style that had been given a “severe” makeover for Jacobs’ barrage of rubber and fake fur. With hair removed from models’ faces, makeup maestro François Nars was given free-reign to pronouncedly paint them. “It’s like a grandmother whose a bit eccentric that puts on too much blush and her eyeliner wrong,” Nars quipped of his “droopy” liner job, drawn downward on the top lash line with his new for Fall Larger Than Life Longwear Eyeliner in Via Venetto, a dark black. Models were also given a heavy flush low on the cheeks courtesy of Nars’ Cream Blush in Lokoune, which he finger-blended to resemble the rouge in “old 18th century paintings.” Lids were dusted with the red shade from his forthcoming Eyeshadow Duo in Grand Palais for depth and lashes were treated to multiple slashings of Nars’ Larger Than Life Volumizing mascara to complete a look that he described as “a little decadent and a little bit off.” It was a spot-on beauty mix for a collection that had lace and latex in equal measure.

Photo: Luca Cannonieri / GoRunway.com