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April 19 2014

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10 posts tagged "Jeanine Lobell"

Cate Blanchett’s Game-Day Decision

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You would never know by Cate Blanchett‘s flawless facade, but that Grace Kelly-esque hair was not always the plan. Inspired by the vintage photo above, mane master Robert Vetica had proposed the idea to the Blue Jasmine star, but they ultimately decided to leave it down with a slight bend at the end since her look at the Los Angeles Film Critics Association Awards the previous day received such rave reviews. After prepping strands with Vidal Sassoon Pro Series Boost & Lift Foaming Air Mousse, blowing it out, and wrapping sections around a curling iron, Vetica pinned it up just so Blanchett could slip into her Armani Privé dress without mussing up the finished product. And then—if you’re a celebrity hairstylist—disaster struck: Blanchett loved the silhouette of the tucked hair so much that she wanted to keep it. With only 15 minutes to spare, Vetica told the team to “get those earrings on” and get her in his chair so that he could make the set a permanent style. “There is a sense of calm,” he said of the last-minute switch, “but inside you’re ready to scream.” Vetica would have employed a different technique if he had been starting from scratch, but he had no choice but to pin everything to the nape of her neck with a handful of bobbies. “There was nothing for the hair to grab onto,” he explained. In other words, that classic roll was hanging onto a hope and a prayer. “Oh, honey, I’m still nervous—I don’t even want to watch TV,” he said during the show. For extra support, the pro “coated that sucker” in Pro Series Flexible Hold Hairspray before finally sending her off.

Maquillage, on the other hand, was far less dramatic. “We spent the week trying different things out, so by today I had an idea of what I wanted to do…I took all the best bits and put them together,” said face painter Jeanine Lobell. “I’ve been working with Cate for 15 years, so you wouldn’t think I would need to rehearse…She doesn’t even sit in front of a mirror when I do her makeup,” Lobell quipped. The pro began by applying Blanchett’s go-to “Jason mask,” otherwise known as the SK-II Facial Treatment Mask, for a boost of hydration. In order to “balance something heavy on the bottom with something on the face,” Lobell focused on the mouth, cheeks, and arches to “hold the dress.” Pink, beige, and gold shadows were dusted across Blanchett’s lids for “texture and depth,” while a combo of Nars Highlighting Blush in Satellite of Love and translucent power were layered on her apples until the perfect flush was achieved. To add dimension to the lips, the pro used Giorgio Armani Rouge Ecstasy Lipstick in 502 like a liner, feathering it in toward the middle, then coated the center with 509, a nude rose. “If I had to give the [end result] a catchphrase, it would be ‘romantic but modern.’ We mixed periods in a way in that it was a strong brow with a super-lashy open eye—kind of Mia Farrow.”

In the end, all of the pieces of the Golden Globes puzzle came together in time for Blanchett to secure yet another statue. “She’s so awesome in this movie, that we wanted to blow it out for her,” Lobell said of the joint effort. Mission accomplished.

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Photo: Getty; Courtesy of Jeanine Lobell

Jeanine Lobell Talks Makeup—No Strings Attached

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We recently reported that Barneys tapped Lou Doillon (and several iterations of her, including a Dolce & Gabbana-clad marionette created by Shona Heath and an illustration by Jo Ratcliffe) for its latest ad campaign shot by Inez & Vinoodh. Now the department store is celebrating the artistic collaboration in its windows—displaying the Doillon mannequin featured in the video for the duration of New York fashion week. We caught up with Jeanine Lobell, the makeup artist responsible for the look on both the live French singer-actress-model and her puppet counterpart.

“We all liked the idea of [capitalizing on] the slight darkness around Lou’s eyes,” said the face painter, referring to this feature as “nature’s eye shadow.” (The rest of us just call these rings dark circles.) For the doll-like look, she applied false eyelashes along the bottom lash line and painted them with Chanel Inimitable Mascara using a small fan brush. To exaggerate the eyes even further, a nude pencil was slicked on the water line and black NARS gel liner was dotted between the lashes. Lobell used a larger strip of falsies on the marionette to make them visible to people on the sidewalk. And while Lou’s lips were dabbed with Armani Lip Maestro in 501 (a velvety stain in a warm rose hue), the faux Frenchie dons pink satin fabric on her pout. Pass by between shows this week and “hang” out with Doillon’s done-up alter ego.

Photo: Tom Sibley

J.W. Anderson Puts Hair on High; Kate Upton Talks About Her Body “Flaw”; and More

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J.W.AndersonFashion’s wonder boy J.W. Anderson debuted his first advertising campaign, snapped by photog Jamie Hawkesworth. The clothes are certainly worth talking about, but we’re currently crushing on model Lucan Gillespie’s extra-high and wavy pony. (And is that a black scrunchie we spy?) [Vogue.com U.K.]

Blond bombshell Kate Upton revealed to Elle.com that her favorite body part is, wait for it…her eyes. “I have yellow in them, and yellow is my favorite color,” she says. As for the feature she isn’t so fond of: her “baby hands.” We have a feeling that with assets like Upton’s, no one’s checking out her manicure.

While there’s no shortage of rebellious teenagers, Esme Edwards, daughter of makeup artist and Stila founder Jeanine Lobell, is taking a legitimate stand against the sexual beauty standard perpetuated by the press and pop stars. The Cut reported that she rejects the “sex-kitten” vibe, but that isn’t to say she doesn’t have the talent (and creative genes) to pull off the look. Check out the teen’s makeup tutorial and her unrivaled feminist spirit.

According to PeopleStyleWatch.com, nobody was more shocked by Beyoncé’s pixie crop Instagram pics than her go-to hairstylist, Kim Kimble, who had a retro-fifties look planned for a weekend video shoot with her star client. (Guess it’s back to the drawing board.) And for all the naysayers who said she just took out her weave or extensions, Kimble dispelled the rumor by noting that Mrs. Carter has naturally long, thick hair. As if we needed another reason to be jealous of Queen Bey.

If you’re headed to Venezuela and aren’t in need of a haircut, might we suggest getting security for your strands. CNN reports that in the coastal city of Maracaibo, thieves nicknamed piranhas are attacking women for their long hair, which they later sell to salons.

Photo: Courtesy of J.W. Anderson

Beauty Nostalgia: Reminiscing With…Jeanine Lobell

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Beauty Nostalgia is a new, weekly column on Beauty Counter in which we ask influencers, tastemakers, and some of our favorite industry experts to wax poetic on the sticks, salves, and sprays that helped shape who they are today.

The Pro: Jeanine Lobell, celebrity makeup artist

The Product: “I’ve always loved red lips. When I was 16, I had wild Louise Brooks hair and I wore a red fuchsia lip every day. I’d go flying down King’s Road in London in Vivienne Westwood clothes on my bicycle with red lips (it was quite a look)! My first obsession was a Shiseido red lipstick, which I started wearing around 1996 before I was a makeup artist. It was the first double-ended lipstick—one end was matte, the other was shiny—and it was before anyone else had that. Of course, MAC came next and now it’s not new. But at the time, my friends and I hoarded this Shiseido lipstick. What I loved about it was that it didn’t make your mouth feel tight and dry, like a lot of lipsticks can. I found it at the Shiseido counter and once I knew it was being discontinued, I stockpiled it.”

“Fresh Girls With A Bit Of An Edge,” Backstage At Stella Resort

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Over the past few seasons, Stella McCartney has made a concerted effort to update the the “quintessential Stella girl’s” beauty routine, as makeup artist Pat McGrath endearingly refers to the natural, glowing, dewy skin she has been charged with giving models backstage at almost all of McCartney’s ready-to-wear collections to date. At her pre-fall show, McCartney requested a streak of electric blue eyeliner; for her Fall show, she stunned the crowd in Paris with bright blue mascara—a season highlight; and at her resort show yesterday in New York, the eyes still had it.

“It’s a fresh girl with a little bit of an edge,” makeup artist Jeanine Lobell surmised of the look of the day, which included McCartney’s signature “glowy” complexions thanks to a combination of Sunday Riley Juno Serum and its Tinted Primer. “Eyeliner is her thing,” Lobell continued of the archetype she was after, which necessitated a straight stroke of Riley’s Gel Pencil in Pitch Black that was scrawled below the lower lash line to offset the “healthy” flush Lobell buffed onto cheeks for a “cloud effect,” courtesy of a foundation brush dusted with Sunday Riley Blush in Blushing. Lids were neutralized with its Prisma Silk Eye Color in Rice Paper and Camille before lashes received a slick of its Mascara in Obsidian Black. As a finishing touch, Lobell treated lips to one of two Sunday Riley Lip Colors: Trench Coat, a taupey nude, which toned down any overt redness and Marie Antoinette, a dusty rose, that was painted onto pouts in need of a little color boost#8212;and resembled the custom-mixed Priti NYC nail lacquer in Fairy’s Petticoat that manicurist Eloise Lennen applied to fingertips in two coats.

Models’ hair was classic Stella, though. “[McCartney]” wanted a natural fall and a natural amount of volume,” hairstylist Tabitha Baker explained, middle parting a newly cropped Ruby Aldridge’s now chin-grazing locks, and setting freshly pressed waves with Aveda Air Control Hairspray. “She didn’t want to see any iron marks so we’re using brushes and our hands to break the waves up,” Baker continued, coating her palms with Arrojo Hair Cream to ensure that the hair had weight, “but still looked polished.”

Photo: Orrie King