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August 30 2014

styledotcom In honor of the #USOpen, 19 of the greatest tennis fashion moments: stylem.ag/1rEJAxM pic.twitter.com/zmmoRkICZb

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20 posts tagged "John Frieda"

Drugstore Discovery: Shampoo That Solves Your Color and Volume Woes at Once

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john-frieda-volume-shampoo I color my hair for many reasons—not the least of which is the insanely good volume I get following a session of highlights. In fact, I have been known to sit patiently with my head covered in heaps of foils for hours just to reap the thickening benefits. I won’t get into the science behind how chemical dyes provide this boost, but suffice to say, the aftereffect of coloring is awesome. Still, this helium-like state only lasts for so long, until your normal texture (and roots) eventually return. Taking note of this reality, the pros at John Frieda decided to bottle a solution, in the form of their new Luxurious Volume Touchably Full for Colour-Treated Hair Shampoo. Made with lightweight plumping compounds and tone-preserving agents, the formula lifts at the roots and prevents fading in equal parts. Having lathered up with it for weeks, I’m now completely obsessed. The shift in volume is incredible—my hair is lush, almost like a wind machine is blowing up my strands. The density lasts all day, too, so much so that when I do a ponytail, I only need to wrap my elastic band around twice, as opposed to three times (a true test of hair’s thickness). The foamy lather also managed to restore my burned-out highlights to their original, sun-flecked glory so that now I can go longer in between salon appointments. But even better: A bottle will set you back less than $6.

Putting on the Glitz, Backstage at Rodarte

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rodarteGlitter, butterflies, and Star Wars—that’s what little girls are made of, at least in the minds of Kate and Laura Mulleavy. There was certainly no shortage of sparkle backstage, as makeup artist James Kaliardos channeled “childhood remembrances of beauty before grunge ruined them,” he explained. And what child of the eighties wouldn’t want glitter lipstick? I’m not talking a delicate sprinkling of sparkle—Kaliardos went to town mixing the fine, shimmery particles with two shades of NARS lipstick: Deborah Audacious (a brown-berry) and Dominique Audacious (a mauve-y pink). Complexions were perfected with full-on foundation, concealer, and powder, while the contours of the face were dusted with a luminescent blush (dubbed Unlawful) and layered with the Matte Multiple in Anguilla. The eyes were as over-the-top as models’ mouths, with the reddish brown side of the forthcoming Dolomites Duo used on the lower rim, over the lid, and up into the brows. The adjacent lavender shadow was dusted on the center and inner corners before mascara was applied to the top lashes only. The resulting cloud of color was how Kaliardos imagined Cinderella would have worn her eye makeup—except she would have chosen pale blue.

The hair—especially on catwalker Chloe Nørgaard, whose rainbow color is as spectacular as a My Little Pony—was equally as dreamy. Odile Gilbert added in extensions for length that could rival Rapunzel’s, before spritzing strands with John Frieda leave-in conditioner and creating two braids. “It’s not a question of being thick, it’s a question of being long,” she explained. After letting the plaits set, she unraveled them to reveal mermaidlike waves before making a side part, twisting one side back, and pinning it in place with a butterfly-adorned barrette. Nails also got the princess treatment—receiving a layer of Sally Hansen lacquer in Pink Dream, an iridescent glitter available in September. If the designers are looking for someone to play dress-up with, I’m ready, willing, and available.

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde; Indigitalimages.com

Wild Child Meets Rock of Ages at Rodarte

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Rodarte

Mountains of mousse, teased hair, and side swoops are back—at least at Rodarte. Odile Gilbert said there was an “eighties intention” behind the look—which was evident by the inflated “bangs” that peaked over the brow and framed the face—as well as Debbie Harry of Blondie, who often sported a deep side part and a swoosh across the top. Gilbert created the look by dousing hair with John Frieda Frizz-Ease Curl Reviver Styling Mousse and blow-drying with a round brush to build body. She used a curling iron to set the flip, and added a slight wave to the length. For additional lift, a Mason Pearson bristle brush was used to back-comb the front section. The hair was then swung over the right shoulder, and a coiled cornrow was hidden near the nape of the neck, acting as a pincushion for the hand-painted extension that was added over the top. While we’ve seen printed looks from Gilbert in the past—like the cheetah-spotted bouffant she created at Jean Paul Gaultier Couture for Fall 2013—for this show she developed a pattern that she described as tweed meets zebra, meant to reflect fabrics used in the collection. After the extension that often contrasted the models’ hair color was secured, the length was conspicuously pinned to one side and shellacked (just as it was in the decade in which the style originated) with loads of Frizz-Ease Moisture Barrier Firm-Hold Hair Spray.

The nails were a different animal altogether (literally): with tortoiseshell patterns painted with a cosmetic sponge by manicurist Tracylee Percival. She first stamped two coats of Sally Hansen Complete Salon Manicure in Clay, a burnt orange, and accented it with patches of Cinnamon, a darker brown, for depth. (Both lacquers were made for yet another collaboration with the Mulleavy sisters, available in March.)

The inspiration for face painter James Kaliardos was a “wild L.A. girl—the real Los Angeles, not the red-carpet kind,” which he brought to life by applying NARS Larger Than Life Eyeliner in Via Veneto in an exaggerated V shape (for models with lids that touched the lash line, he implored Black Valley Eye Paint and an angled brush). Lashes were coated with Larger Than Life Lengthening Mascara, and arches were brushed up with Oural Brow Gel to give them an untamed and “animal-like” quality. To lift the eye and make it more graphic, Kaliardos applied a dot of Radiant Creamy Concealer underneath the eye that was paler than each model’s skin, which he said reminded him of either a leopard or Veruschka. The Matte Multiples in Altai and Anguilla (out spring 2014) were blended onto cheeks for color and contour. And the pinky-nude lip color was a combination of two Satin Lip Pencils in Biscayne Park and Floralies. Between the hair, manicures, and makeup, it was like a high-fashion zoo backstage.

Photos: Ivan Lattuada / Indigitalimages.com

Beauty Etiquetter: Deciphering The Salon-Tipping Pecking Order

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Serge-Normant-John-FriedaBeauty Etiquetter addresses your beauty-protocol predicaments with candid advice from industry experts and those in the know. To submit a question, e-mail celia_ellenberg@condenast.com.

The Quandary: “I always tip my hairstylist, but do I need to tip the shampoo girl, colorist, coat-check woman, receptionist who orders my latte…? I always feel like I need to tip the entire salon, which adds up.”

The Expert in Residence: Sean Gallagher, colorist and stylist at the Serge Normant at John Frieda Salon in NYC.

The Advice: “Who and how much you tip is an age-old question when it comes to beauty services. If you’ve received a color treatment and a cut or style, it is customary to tip both the colorist and the stylist—provided the work was done by two different people. Many people tip around 15 percent of the cost of the service, but the amount is at your discretion. If you feel your service was truly great, feel free to tip more. A small tip for the shampoo person and/or assistant is always appreciated—if you’re unsure who to tip, you can leave a little extra with your stylist or colorist and ask them to pass it along to their assistant. Typically there isn’t a need to tip a receptionist or a coat person, as tips are usually for services only. Additionally, if you are seeing the owner of the salon, you do not need to tip him or her either, as they receive the money you pay for the price of your service. As a rule, tip what you can afford and know that a thank-you note goes a long way!”

Photo: Courtesy of Serge Normant at John Frieda Salon NYC

Beauty Nostalgia: Reminiscing With…Harry Josh

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Beauty Nostalgia is a weekly column on Beauty Counter in which we ask influencers, tastemakers, and some of our favorite industry experts to wax poetic on the sticks, salves, and sprays that helped shape who they are today.

The Pro: Harry Josh, celebrity hairstylist and John Frieda international creative consultant.

The Products: “Gisele and I have a long history. We met sixteen years ago when I was casting a fashion show for Richard Tyler in London. She was a new model who had just come from Brazil. We were friends for a year or two before I even touched her hair. The friendship always came first. She actually looked identical to the way she does now, only a little paler. I remember using John Frieda Ocean Waves on Gisele during those early days. It came in a spray bottle and you had to shake it up to activate the oil and ocean-y part. It was made with coconut oil and smelled like suntan lotion. It gave you that beachy texture that’s impossible to recreate from the ocean. Gisele always liked the smell; it was like summer. I think I used it on literally every single shoot for the Victoria Secret’s swim catalogs. The product was discontinued, though, so now I use Bumble and Bumble Surf Spray. Another old favorite that’s no longer around is John Frieda Spun Gold Finisher. It came in this little tin and you tapped it on your fingers and ran it through the hair. I always used it on Gisele, not that she would know it…she never knows what’s going on with her hair at shoots! She’s usually playing with her kids, but this product was the trick for giving her hair that super glossy and sleek finish.”

Photo: Jean Baptiste Lacroix/WireImage