Style.com

July 23 2014

styledotcom The @FiftyShades director went inside Coco Chanel's apartment. There were no whips, though. stylem.ag/1yYYWNl pic.twitter.com/N1lKWfgMgm

Subscribe to Style Magazine
31 posts tagged "Kérastase"

A Blue Streak and Braids, Backstage at Creatures of the Wind

-------

creatures-of-the-windAs The Space Lady (aka Susan Dietrich, a former eighties street performer in San Francisco) blasted through the air, makeup artist James Boehmer talked about transcendence—the inspiration for the designers’ Fall collection, which faded from dark, heavy fabrics to white, airy materials. The color that began to appear by look seven was reflected in the makeup via NARS Larger Than Life Eyeliner in Khao San Road, an electric blue shade that was applied to the lower, inner rim. “It’s more of an effect than a color,” he explained, “It makes the eyes look big, bright, dreamy, and ethereal.” Sharon Tate served as the muse for the long, fluttery lashes on both top and bottom, along with the brows that were gelled-up just in the inner corners. The dewy skin and ultra-shiny lips, however, were taken directly from a seventies Princess Leia. “She always had perfect lip gloss no matter what happened,” said Boehmer. Complexions were hydrated with NARSskin Aqua Gel Luminous Oil-Free Moisturizer and cheekbones highlighted with Rosebud Salve for extra “gleam.” A blend of the forthcoming Matte Multiple in Mauritanie and Triple X Lip Gloss were “thumbed” onto models’ mouths. “It’s meant to look as if she’s just [ate] honey,” he said of the glassy finish.

Thankfully, Star Wars didn’t inspire the braid crafted by Odile Gilbert. Instead, the designers wanted something “cool,” she said. This resulted in a continuous plait that started at the crown of the head, wrapped around the front “like a bang,” and finished down the back. To prep strands, Gilbert used Kérastase Mousse Bouffante and Lift Vertige on damp hair for texture before blowing it dry, then added extensions a shade lighter than each girl’s natural color where needed. After making a side part with the pointed end of a tail comb and braiding, she roughed it up with her fingers to create “whisps” before finishing with Laque Dentelle hairspray and Touche Perfection cream for shine. “Don’t be afraid to destroy,” she told a stylist on her team as he watched in horror as she roughed up his perfect plait. The finished look took all of five minutes. “It’s like a little hat,” Gilbert quipped.

The “water-marbled” nails by manicurist Katie Jane Hughes also had an outer space reference (although there was no mention of Jedi Knights). After applying a base coat of Butter London Nail Lacquer in Trallop or Teddy Girl, Hughes applied a drop of Diamond Geezer, Billy No Mates, Yummy Mummy, Pearly Queen, and Posh Bird into a bowl of water. After swirling the shades with a stick, she gently dipped the nude or pink tip into the floating pattern. The result was reminiscent of “agate” or “cosmic environments,” she said. Hughes made the technique look relatively easy, but if you try this one at home, may the force be with you.

Photo: Getty

Beauty 411: Rheanne White

-------

RheanneWhite-cropSince the premiere of HBO’s Girls, a great many people have, understandably so, come to care deeply about Lena Dunham—what she says, what she wears, what she posts on Instagram, and, naturally, what she does to her hair. And though the pixie has experienced a major celebrity surge this year (see: Jennifer Lawrence, Pamela Anderson and, briefly, Beyoncé), Dunham’s crop was among the first and, in our opinion, the best. The stylist responsible for the wispy pixie perfection? Rheanne White. And as of this month the longtime freelance stylist, whose handiwork has graced the pages of such magazines as GQ, Vanity Fair, and Marie Claire, is sharing her talent with the masses thanks to the opening of her first eponymous salon (Rheanne White Salon, 14 Jay St., 212-966-2928; rheannewhite.com). Here, White shares some of her own go-to products and places, many of which, it should be pointed out, are a mere stone’s throw from her new Tribeca digs.

THE HAIR STYLING TOOLS: Shu Uemura and Layrite
“I love Shu Uemura’s Essence Absolue Nourishing Oil-in-Cream because it’s so user friendly. It’s great on fine to thick hair with curls and waves, and a quarter-size amount is all you need for shine and control. And Layrite makes the best pomades—they’re all water-soluble. I use the Men’s Layrite Super Hold not just on my male clients, but also on women’s short hair any time I want to give a style that piece-y look.”

See shuuemuraartofhair-usa.com and layrite.com

THE SHAMPOO DUO: Kérastase and Shu Uemura
“Kérastase K Powder Bluff Dry Shampoo is great for making a good hair day last a little longer. Just spray at the roots to soak up an oily scalp and get that bounce and texture back. And Shu Uemura Ultimate Remedy Shampoo is a cure-all for winter hair.”

See kerastase-usa.com and shuuemuraartofhair-usa.com

THE SKINCARE ESSENTIAL: Mun Skin
“Makeup artist Munemi Imai makes the best face oil. I use the No. 1 Aknari Nighttime Dream Youth Serum every day and put any remaining product on my hair.”

See munskin.com

THE HOME SCENT: Le Feu De L’Eau
“Le Feu De L’Eau make the most divine candles. I can’t pick a favorite—I burn them all on different days at my salon.”

See lefeudeleau.com

THE ACCESSORY GURU: Pamela Love
“I love everything she does. I want it all. So badass!”

See pamelalovenyc.com

THE SKIN APPOINTMENT: Diamond Facial at Shibui Spa
“My facialist, Kate Walsh, uses Natura Bissé, an amazing, family-owned skincare line from Barcelona that focuses on gentle-but-effective exfoliation. She also uses muscle manipulation massages to leave the skin plumped, hydrated, and glowing.”

377 Greenwich St., New York, NY, (646) 203-0045; thegreenwichhotel.com/shibui-spa

THE MASSAGE: Euphoria Spa
“They have too many amazing massages to pick just one. It really depends on what you need that day. I’ve had the Myofascial Release and Craniosacral Therapy—a hands-on massage technique that involves applying gentle, sustained pressure into connective tissue restrictions in order to alleviate pain, improve flexibility, restore motion, and create fluidity. Deep-tissue massage is also applied when needed.”

18 Harrison St., New York, NY, (212) 925-5925; euphoriaspanyc.com

THE ONE-STOP-BEAUTY-SHOP: Space.NK Apothecary
“This is my go-to when I’m in need of a new face cream. I love RéVive—worth every penny!”

90 Greene St., New York, NY, (212) 941-4200; us.spacenk.com

THE WORKOUT: Aqua Cycling
“Give this in-water spinning class a try. Trust me—it’s so much fun and gives great results without the post-workout soreness.”

78 Franklin St., New York, NY, (212) 966-6784; aquastudiony.com

THE CAFFEINE SPOT: Laughing Man
“This little gem has some of the best coffee and teas in the ‘hood. We only serve their goods at the salon.”

184 Duane St., New York, NY; livelaughingman.com

Photo: Taea Thale

True Grit, Backstage at Rick Owens

-------

rickowensAll season long makeup artists and hairstylists have been riffing on “real girl” beauty backstage—leaving strands and complexions purposely au naturel so that the consumer can more easily imagine herself wearing the clothes. But at the end of the day, as Tom Pecheux put it at Balmain, supermodels are still supermodels—and the rest of us are just “real.” But the unlikely lineup of forty step dancers from Washington, D.C., and New York City-based crews (Momentum, Soul Steps, Zetas, Washington Divas) at Rick Owens was an exuberant celebration of authenticity. “The whole point was to make them look and feel pretty,” said Owens. “If a girl didn’t feel comfortable with something, we didn’t do it—we wanted them to feel powerful.”

To emphasize their dynamic movements, hair pro Luigi Murenu designed four different styles. The first being a fluffy texture that he aptly dubbed “dandelion heads,” created by straightening strands, “biting” them with a crimping iron, and brushing out the kinks with a Mason Pearson to get a “cotton candy-like” finish that flew with each aggressive stomp. The other three included a slicked-back chignon (which he formed using Kérastase Vinyle Nutri-Sculpt and hair spray, sometimes fitting the dancer with a “nunlike” veil), stick-straight hair with center parts, and low, sleek ponytails.

“What they’re doing is so ‘wow’ that it’s about them and the clothes—it’s not really about this bit,” face painter Lucia Pieroni said of the “fresh” makeup. “There’s no particular thing on everybody,” she added. Pieroni used a light layer of foundation and concealer, filled in arches where needed, and moisturized lips with a clear balm—tailoring the look to each dancer. The end result, although stripped down, relayed an important message: When individuality is this spectacular, why attempt to conform?

Photo: Alessandro Garofalo / Indigitalimages.com

Just Do It: A Sporty Swoosh at Emilio Pucci

-------

pucci-hair-ss-14Duran Duran, Madonna, and Daria Werbowy were all name-checked by hairstylist Luigi Murenu backstage at Emilio Pucci. So what exactly do an eighties English rock band, the Queen of Pop, and a supermodel have in common? At one point or another, they’ve all sported the pushed-over look he re-created for the catwalk here. Not only does a swoop over one eye provide instant “cool girl” status, Murenu elaborated, but it also builds volume without having to fire up a blow-dryer. For additional lift, he spritzed Kérastase Lift Vertige on roots and worked Mousse Bouffante through dry strands for texture. He used a one-inch curling iron to add a slight bend, wrapping sections from the ear down around the barrel. Hair spray was misted all over to set, while Vinyle Nutri-Sculpt cream coaxed out layers and created a piece-y finish.

“We have a definite image for the Pucci girl that we’ve been developing over the past four or five seasons,” said face painter Lisa Butler. “The makeup is very secondary to this whole process.” She went on to explain that the house’s creative director, Peter Dundas, doesn’t love foundation or color on the face, but Butler managed to use plenty of both in a nearly undetectable way. To inject drama and dimension minus eye liner, lashes, or lipstick, she added depth to the skin by mixing a foundation that matched each model’s skin tone with the deepest bitter chocolate shade MAC carries in its Face and Body line. It’s a technique she’s often employed on shoots but hasn’t brought to the runway until now. “When you see girls [in photos] and they look grubby and mean, this is why—it makes them [appear] more moody,” Butler explained—an effect an orange-brown bronzer couldn’t possibly produce. A blend of Cultivating Chic and March Mist shadows (beige and gray shades from the MAC Spring ’14 Trend Forecast Eye Palette) was applied to the lids, up through the brows, and along the lower lash lines with a fluffy brush. The same combo (with a higher ratio of beige to gray) was dusted under the cheekbones to act as a contour. Butler squiggled brow pencil on the corners of arches and took the edge off with a bit of blending to make them appear “fluffier,” then used the same pencil to lightly dot freckles over the bridge of the nose and under the eyes. In the Mode (a taupe hue) was applied to take down redness in the lips, and New Groove (a wine) was pushed into the inner rim of the mouth (both colors in the Spring ’14 Trend Forecast Lip Palette). The finished product was a “groomed but not done” tough girl—an aesthetic that lent itself perfectly to the slick leather, athletic mesh, and heavyweight-champion-worthy boxing belts seen on the runway.

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde / Indigitalimages.com

Sporty But Still Smoldering, Backstage At Gucci

-------

anja-rubik-beauty-gucci-ss-2014

Sex appeal is always expected backstage at Gucci, but this season, creative director Frida Giannini requested that face painter Pat McGrath and hair guru Luigi Murenu take a more athletic approach. “She wanted something sporty but still made up,” McGrath explained. In lieu of harsh pencils, a shimmery, golden-brown shadow was gently wrapped around the eyes—with the outer corners intensified in a sideways “V” shape for definition. To incorporate the copper shade that was threaded throughout the collection, McGrath added the same hue to the center of lids, working the pigment from the lash line up toward the crease. The top lashes were curled and coated with black-brown mascara, arches were filled in, and lips were left natural, with the exception of a clear balm for moisture. To add warmth, the makeup artist opted for a foundation—instead of often heavy and cake-y bronzers—one to two shades darker than each model’s complexion, blending it from apple to temple. A combo of cream and powder highlighters placed on cheekbones and brow bones lent a dewy effect to skin, and a touch of Elizabeth Arden Eight Hour Cream was applied to lids right before the models hit the runway for extra sheen.

Murenu created a style that played on the theme but was still “glam and exceptional.” To give hair oomph, he applied Kérastase Lift Vertige to roots and Mousse Bouffant throughout before blow-drying—using either a round brush or his fingers to add volume from forehead to crown. Once strands were dry, he wrapped small sections from the mid-length down around a curling iron to form loose waves. Murenu scraped the hair off the face with Elixir Ultime for Colour Treated Hair and worked it through to the ends for texture and shine that didn’t appear wet, greasy, or limp. “In my mind, I imagined Lauren Hutton going for a jog in the seventies,” he said. A few spritzes of Gloss Appeal were misted over top to finish. I might be more inclined to exercise if, at the end of it, I walked away looking as fabulous as a Gucci girl.