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July 31 2014

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3 posts tagged "Kiss My Face"

Love And Peace Soap

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Kiss My Face revolutionized the idea of soap for me in the eighties. Before it was cool to be green, my reformed-hippie mother filled our house with natural bath and body products, including the Hudson River Valley-based company’s olive oil soap, a thick, olive-colored bar that didn’t look anything like what my friends’ moms’ kept in their bathrooms. The company’s founders, vegetarians Bob McLeod and Steve Byckiewicz, were pioneers of the eco-chic movement, and they’re poised to shake things up again with the release of their new Peace Soap. Combining organic olive oil with coconut, hemp, and jojoba oils, McLeod and Byckiewicz have created a castile soap to rival Dr. Bronner’s—and theirs comes with a twist. The multi-use product, which features four different scents (I’ve been lathering with Lemongrass Clary Sage of late), was created in partnership with Seeds of Peace, a nonprofit organization that aims to resolve international conflict by sending kids to camp. Founded in 1993, the program brings children from rivaling cultures, be it Palestine and Israel or India and Pakistan, together. The thinking goes that under the right circumstances—namely, a summer camp in Maine—young people can participate in open dialogues and learn to see beyond their inbred animosity. Ten percent of the proceeds from the sale of Peace Soap go to the program, but your contribution doesn’t have to end at buying a bottle. For every 10,000 people who log on to www.thepledgeforpeace.com from June 15 to September 15 and write about what they plan do to promote peace in their own way, Kiss My Face will send one kid to camp. Think of it as a way to clean your body and soul this summer.

Photo: Courtesy of Kiss My Face

The Battle Against “Green-Washing” Is On

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Going green is hot, and everyone wants in on the action—from large corporations to smaller niche brands. But the rush to release soaps, shampoos, skincare, and makeup with “natural” or “organic” on their labels is causing a quality-control issue. Or so say certain pioneers of the green movement, who have filed a complaint with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Organic Program (NOP) against 13 personal care companies they allege have made false claims on their products. Dr. Bronner’s Magic Soaps, Intelligent Nutrients, Organic Essence, and the Organic Consumers Association have called out Jason Pure Natural and Organic, Kiss My Face, Nature’s Gate Organics, and Stella McCartney’s Care line (which was discontinued in 2008), among others, for claiming that their products are organic without actually using any organic ingredients. What does this mean for you and me? Some argue that stricter regulations from the government would stifle innovation in the organic personal care category; others say that without them, it will become increasingly harder for consumers—and legitimate operations—to seek greener pastures. If anything, take this as a call to action to be more diligent about reading the labels on the back of your favorite products since, unfortunately, you can’t believe everything they say on the front. For more information on how to decode all the jargon, visit the Environmental Working Group and Labels for Life. [WWD]

Photo: Courtesy of Dr. Bronner’s

Kiss My Face’s Greenhouse Effect

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Before it was trendy to eat organic and Whole Foods Market was but a conglomerate- builder’s fantasy, Kiss My Face was making all-natural face and body products out of a converted barn and feed store in the Hudson River valley, where it remains today. Managing to stay true to its eco-conscious roots while continuing to serve as a pioneer in the industry, the brand reveals its “greenhouse” this month—an innovative effort that showcases its moisturizers, liquid soaps, shave creams, and body oils in an in-store display that’s made from 90 percent recycled materials—from graphics printed with non-polluting water solvent inks down to the steel-built nuts and bolts. The initiative comes as the company enters into a partnership with RecycleBank, an organization that rewards consumers for recycling trash in their own neighborhoods, and in anticipation of its new Potent & Pure line—an organic face-care regimen that’s sold in 65 percent recycled packaging and is produced using wind power. Precyclers, rejoice.

Photo: Courtesy of Kiss My Face