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April 19 2014

styledotcom An embarrassment of riches in the Berkshires: stylem.ag/1h44ScB

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19 posts tagged "L’Oréal Professionnel"

“Handsome” Girls, Backstage at Giambattista Valli

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valliThis season, the designer created clothes for a “woman who was confident to dress in women’s clothes,” but the makeup, as describe by face painter Val Garland, was “healthy, wealthy, and handsome.” Brushed-up brows, perfected complexions, and lips topped with a clear mattifying formula from MAC comprised the look. “Just before they go out, we are going to give them a little massage on their cheeks so we get nice, natural color—but it’s not a blush,” she noted. The sheen on the high points of the face came courtesy of moisturizer, rather than a shimmery pigment, applied with a fan brush. “I’m a bit over the frosty sheen of highlighter, I think it’s dying a death,” Garland said. And similar to the London shows, she made a point of not picking up mascara. “It can look commercial when what you want to get across is something more directional,” she explained. But for those of us in the live real world and not on the runway, she suggests hanging onto our go-to tubes. “You can’t live without it—none of us can.” As much as I despise scrubbing off the black rings that form post-shower, I have to agree.

Hair pro Orlando Pita crafted a clean, natural ponytail—adding shine and canceling any flyaways with L’Oréal Professionnel Mythic Oil. “This makes it shiny, touchable, and soft—all the things the girls’ [strands] aren’t during the season,” he said. The tails were bent slightly with a curling iron for movement. Asked if the hair would be tucked into the collars and high-necked pieces in the collection (a trend that’s held strong since New York), Pita said that would be a game-time decision left up to Valli. The “haphazard” feeling this finishing touch lends, however, is something the mane master fully supports: “It’s as if you just got up and threw on a T-shirt—except [the T-shirt] is actually a Giambattista Valli dress—and headed out the door.” That sounds like my kind of morning.

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde; Indigitalimages.com

Taking It Easy, Backstage at Chloé

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chloe“If someone looks like they put too much effort in, it’s almost not cool,” said hairstylist James Pecis—that’s especially true if you’re the Chloé woman. “Soft,” “fresh,” and “easy” are just a few of the key words both he and makeup artist Diane Kendal used to describe the brand’s DNA and its aesthetic. For Pecis, that meant forming a side part just above the inner corner of the eye, pulling the right side back and tying it at the nape with a piece of elastic to give the impression of an asymmetrical cut. Texture was created via L’Oréal Professionnel Tecni Art Volume Lift Spray-Mousse, which was applied from roots to ends and blown dry. Sections were then wound loosely around a curling iron for a bit of bend and finished off with Wild Stylers Next Day Hair, a formula that works similarly to a dry shampoo. While the end result appeared quite simple, there was an underlying precision. “All of the parts are made on the right and the hair [swooped over] to the left,” Pecis explained. “It’s very specific, because when the models turn the first corner on the runway, the wind catches in their hair. We have to make sure it opens it up so the cameras can get each girl’s picture.”

This season Kendal reached for a hue well outside the beige family. “Clare [Waight Keller] was saying she really wanted to incorporate violet,” the face painter noted of her discussion with the creative director. Of course, this was no in-your-face purple eye, but an iridescent lilac shade created with a mushroom-colored “greasepaint” and MAC Eye Shadow in Beautiful Iris. For a smoky effect, Kendal used a taupe sculpting cream in the “banana” of the lid and underneath the lower lashes, pulling it out into a subtle feline shape. Next, a gray-blue shimmer pencil was run across the waterline for a brightening effect. Similar to the airy chiffon dresses or cozy, oversize coats (one of which was worn by none other than Sasha Pivovarova) in the collection, the pastel palette employed on the eyes was fiercely feminine.

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde/ Indigitalimages.com

“Forties Grunge,” Backstage at Carven

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carven-crop“She spends more time on her art than her hair,” backstage pro James Pecis said of the Dada-collecting intellectual who inspired the look. The forties influence seen in the clothes was reflected by way of a single marcel wave—created by bending a section at eye level around the barrel of a curling iron. L’Oréal Professionnel Tecni Art Super Dust was used throughout for “traction” (the under-layers were stitched down using a large upholstery needle and elastic string), and mousse was pressed in at the crown to cancel any flyaways. The finished look was “forties grunge,” Pecis explained.

In contrast to the roughed-up strands, the brows were shiny and pristine. Makeup artist Nina Haverkamp painted a transparent Kryolan gel onto arches before topping it with clear lip gloss. Cheekbones were lightly coated with Rosebud Salve, and lids were washed with a shimmery taupe to mimic the color that often appears due to lack of sleep. Trust me, I don’t need eyeshadow to re-create that.

Fringe Benefits, Backstage at Rochas

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rochasTo say that makeup artist Lucia Pieroni was lashing out backstage at Rochas was an understatement: She was piling on the faux fringe, three lashes per eye. A full set was placed on the top, the ends trimmed off and then stuck back on in the center above the iris. Another false lash was layered on top of that for thickness. Pieroni didn’t skimp along the bottom, either: A set was cut in half and overlapped in the middle. “It’s supposed to be a little messy,” she noted. While the fringe was certainly full, there wasn’t any black liner or shadow used to “hide a multitude of sins,” just a shimmery champagne shadow across the lid and a taupe for shading (both from the forthcoming Clé de Peau Beauté Eye Color Quad in 303). Cheeks were dusted with a bronze-hued blush for “freshness,” and lips were polished off with a flesh tone.

While Pieroni employed a few artificial elements to achieve the “sixties, dolly” look, hair pro Luigi Murenu kept things rather pared-down and simple. “It’s about purity and tact,” he explained of the “sensitive” waves. After applying L’Oréal Professionnel mousse through strands and blowing them dry, he wrapped the mid-lengths around a curling iron. The ends were straightened with a flat iron and the top was kept smooth; the look was polished off with Kérastase Elixir Ultime the Imperial. “As much as women want natural hair, they want quality,” Murenu said. Yes, we want to have our cake and eat it too.

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde; Indigitalimages.com

Gettin’ Flossy, Backstage at Anthony Vaccarello

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anthony-vaccarelloInspiration comes from everywhere, and in the case of makeup artist Tom Pecheux, we mean everywhere. Before the face painter left for Milan, he had concocted an entirely different look with the designer. Upon returning to Paris, they both decided it wasn’t right. So what brilliant tool does one turn to when in need of something fresh? Floss. (Yes, really.) “That same morning before going to the fitting I had an appointment with the dentist, and I was sitting in the dentist’s chair, and I was like, ‘Ah, yes—floss,’” Pecheux said. (It wouldn’t have been my first thought while awaiting the drill, but hey, that’s what makes the man such a genius.) After prepping lids with powder and using a black pencil in between the lashes, he coated a strand of floss wound tightly between his fingers with Estée Lauder Pure Color Envy Sculpting Lipstick in Envious, then pressed it above the top lashes and below the bottom set. With model Liu Wen acting as his “sexy assistant” by holding the Double Wear Zero-Smudge Liquid Eyeliner while he ran the string over the tip, Pecheux framed the graphic red lines with skinny black bands, adding a final onyx slash in the “banana” (i.e., crease). Aside from a trip to the dentist’s office, illustrators like René Gruau and Tony Viramontes inspired the eighties-meets-rock-and-roll maquillage; the color palette came by way of the collection (particularly the shiny, crimson ruffle on Look 26). While this isn’t the first time Pecheux reached for floss in a fashion context (having used it for an editorial in V magazine), improvements in oral care did pose a new challenge: “Fifteen years ago dental floss was dry, and now it has wax on it, so it’s very slippery,” he noted.

The hair by Anthony Turner was equally as edgy, but in lieu of clean lines, the pro employed a “bit of bend” to give strands movement. After prepping with L’Oréal Professionnel Tecni Art Pli Thermo-Fixing Spray, he pressed sections in with his fingers while blow-drying. “It shouldn’t feel too sad—it’s not about grungy, lank, nothing hair,” he explained. A masculine side part was made, Wild Stylers Next Day Hair (“a dry shampoo without the dustiness”) was misted all over, and the length was tucked behind the ears and into the “polar necks” that completed the majority of the ensembles—a gesture we’ve seen multiple times throughout the season. “She means business, I reckon, this woman. She doesn’t even think about her hair,” said Turner. I reckon I’d agree.

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde; Indigitalimages.com