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July 29 2014

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72 posts tagged "Lucia Pieroni"

Flashback Friday: At Long Lash

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willyFlashback Friday is a feature on Beauty Counter in which we pore over the pages of our favorite glossies from decades past in search of a little modern-day makeup and hair inspiration.

The Model: Willy van Rooy

The Moment: Full Fringe

The Motivation: With the rise of Kardashian and Ko., faux lashes have lost a little of their Old Hollywood appeal. And admittedly, we’ve never been that adept at gluing on fake fringe. This season, however, we may just have to step up our skills. Makeup artists are lashing out on the reg—from Pat McGrath at Gucci and Versace to Lucia Pieroni at Rochas. In lieu of reality TV, however, we plan to look at the runways and shots like this British Vogue image for beauty inspiration. The photo was captured in 1967, but judging by what’s trending on the Fall 2014 catwalks, we doubt anyone would bat an eyelash if we said this was snapped in the past few weeks.

Photo: David Bailey for Vogue U.K., 1967; courtesy of www.supermodelobsession.tumblr.com

A Mixed Bag, Backstage at Rick Owens

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rick-owensSpring provided us with grit-faced step dancers, but this season I was met with a motley crew of models—ranging from real women employed by the designer to current catwalkers (like Hanne Gaby Odiele and Alana Zimmer) to models beyond the ripe old age of 21 (such as Kirsten Owen and Hannelore Knuts). It was yet another powerful message this week that age does not define beauty, or for that matter, fashion.

Makeup artist Lucia Pieroni skipped harsh edges and black shades, opting for varying tones of brown that were customized to suit each woman. The real challenge was making everyone feel comfortable within the context of very little makeup, she explained. Luigi Murenu revived hairstyle hits from seasons past: the “dandelion heads” of Fall 2013 and the “dew rags” hailing from Spring 2009, not to mention a few shaved heads thrown in for good measure. “We have to look at the faces in the mirror and work with it—we’re taking a compassionate approach,” he noted.

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde; Indigitalimages.com

Fringe Benefits, Backstage at Rochas

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rochasTo say that makeup artist Lucia Pieroni was lashing out backstage at Rochas was an understatement: She was piling on the faux fringe, three lashes per eye. A full set was placed on the top, the ends trimmed off and then stuck back on in the center above the iris. Another false lash was layered on top of that for thickness. Pieroni didn’t skimp along the bottom, either: A set was cut in half and overlapped in the middle. “It’s supposed to be a little messy,” she noted. While the fringe was certainly full, there wasn’t any black liner or shadow used to “hide a multitude of sins,” just a shimmery champagne shadow across the lid and a taupe for shading (both from the forthcoming Clé de Peau Beauté Eye Color Quad in 303). Cheeks were dusted with a bronze-hued blush for “freshness,” and lips were polished off with a flesh tone.

While Pieroni employed a few artificial elements to achieve the “sixties, dolly” look, hair pro Luigi Murenu kept things rather pared-down and simple. “It’s about purity and tact,” he explained of the “sensitive” waves. After applying L’Oréal Professionnel mousse through strands and blowing them dry, he wrapped the mid-lengths around a curling iron. The ends were straightened with a flat iron and the top was kept smooth; the look was polished off with Kérastase Elixir Ultime the Imperial. “As much as women want natural hair, they want quality,” Murenu said. Yes, we want to have our cake and eat it too.

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde; Indigitalimages.com

Up All Night, Backstage at Missoni

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missoniMakeup artist Lucia Pieroni described the woman at Missoni as “a cool girl who’s been out all night, she’s got her boyfriend’s coat on, and is waiting for the bus around six in the morning.” In the case of today’s show, that coat would involve chevron stripes and vibrant tangerine trim.

The focus was primarily on the eyes—particularly the lashes, where “tons and tons and tons of mascara” was used from the iris to the outer corners on top and bottom to create a spidery, “haywire” effect. For an even more imperfect finish, lashes were pinched together to make them “a bit crooked.” (Some models with sparser fringe received a set of falsies for thickness, just on the outer half of the eyes.) To intensify the clumpy effect, MAC Fluidline in Blacktrack was applied from the middle outward on the upper and lower lash lines in a soft square shape, then blended with a matte, ebony-colored shadow.

“It feels like she’s done her hair herself, but not in front of a mirror,” Eugene Souleiman said of the “imbalanced” topknots. (The Missoni girl likely crafted this while she was waiting for the bus to pull up.) The style was simple enough to create: Loosely secure a ponytail with elastic to create “bagginess,” then pin in place. Since multiple models were dashing from Dolce & Gabbana via car and moped (no time to wait for public transportation), “necessity became the mother of invention,” Souleiman explained. “I love it because it’s a five-minute hairdo.”

Photo: Indigitalimages.com

One Part Linda Evangelista, One Part Jean Seberg, Backstage at Moschino

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FASHION-ITALY-MOSCHINOInstead of McDonald’s fries, Hershey’s chocolate bars, or Budweiser beers, hair pro Paul Hanlon served up wigs with an “at-home haircut” feeling backstage. His iPad was filled with reference photos of Mia Farrow, Jean Seberg, and Edie Sedgwick, but he did give the “all-American icons” Jeremy Scott incorporated into his first collection for Moschino some thought: “There’s those SpongeBob Square things [on some of the clothes],” Hanlon said. One beauty editor piped up, “You mean SpongeBob SquarePants?” His reply: “Yeah, him.” The faux strands weren’t meant to look real—the main reason being budget, but also out of practicality. “It lasts for seven minutes, why not just go for it?” he said of the look. Hanlon’s special touch was yanking the wigs back so that the choppy fringe rested directly on the hairline. “Otherwise it could look a little salon,” he explained.

“There’s a slight Linda Evangelista inspiration with these straight, very boyish brows,” said makeup artist Lucia Pieroni. The perfect skin was influenced by Peter Lindbergh’s photos, which she re-created using a light base of foundation, highlighter (MAC Eye Shadow in Vanilla), and a wash of Cream Colour Base in Pearl on the lids. Eyes were emphasized along the socket with Pro Longwear Paint Pot in Groundwork. Lips were slicked with a range of nude lipsticks depending on each model’s skin tone. “This is very simple and beautiful,” Pieroni said, referring to the face. “It’s all going on everywhere else.” I think the decision not to compete with Chester Cheetah, Ronald McDonald, and Mr. SquarePants was a wise one.

Photo: Getty