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July 28 2014

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39 posts tagged "Luigi Murenu"

“Extreme” Beauty, Backstage At Viktor & Rolf

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Stick-on makeup cutouts like the kind we’ve spied at Gareth Pugh and Fendi may seem like a newfangled trick to beauty novices, but Pat McGrath’s unimpressed. “We’ve been doing it for 15 years,” she said backstage at Viktor & Rolf, where she broke out bits of high-shine pink paper that had been traced and snipped into the shape of winged-out eye liner. “It’s something we came up with as a way to get an eye liner on quickly,” for, say, another sweltering backstage show in Paris where slaving over a precise pigment application is nearly impossible. To coincide with the designers’ “doll” theme for Spring, McGrath thought about what kind of makeup a modern Barbie would wear and decided it definitely wouldn’t be that sixties-era blue eye shadow-and-cat eye prototype. “It would be some kind of crazy angles or crazy color. The modern woman likes extremes,” according to McGrath, who was applying the paper pieces with glue over a brown smudged-out lid and adding both pink and black rows of false lashes for impact. Rosy, hot pink cheeks and a fluoro pink lip finished off the radical message to Mattel.


Hairstylist Luigi Murenu added to the modernization effort by bringing the “graphicity,” as he called it, with heavy, thick manes of pushed-back hair. “It’s dry, Victorian texture with an architectural touch,” Murenu said, coating strands with John Frieda Luxurious Volume Thickening Mousse, applying heat, imparting an “invisible crimp,” and brushing through for fullness.

“Ghostly But Still Glamorous,” Backstage at Rick Owens

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Seeing as how that striking image of a matte red lip, bleached brows, and texturized sleek hair from Rick Owens’ Fall show is still burned into our brain six months later, the backstage scene for Spring drummed up more than a little bit of déjà vu. “He really likes a pale woman,” makeup artist Lucia Pieroni surmised of Owens’ partiality for blocked-out arches and extra-perfected, ethereal skin. “It gets rid of the features so the girls look more sculptural,” she continued of the designer’s preferred face-painting technique, pointing out that this season’s woman was slightly less “spooky” then she’s been in the past. “It’s really Art Deco goddess—almost like the woman on the front of a Rolls-Royce,” Pieroni explained, coating skin in MAC Pro Face & Body Foundation in White—a unique complexion enhancer that blends to a transparent milky finish, imparting an almost supernatural pallor. After patting a white matte powder around the outer corners of the eyes and on top of cheekbones where a highlighter normally would be to further the transparent quality of the skin, Pieroni devoted her attention to building a truly retina-burning red lip. “I’d call it a fiery orange,” she said, layering MAC Lip Mix in Red, Orange, and White onto mouths, a mixture that dried down to a velvety, flat finish. Paired with hairstylist Luigi Murenu’s complex updos that were one part twist and one part faux fade—sides were slicked down to create a masculine, almost pompadourlike top section that transitioned into a knotted ponytail in the back—the entire package was both otherworldly and dually chic. “It’s ghostly but still glamorous,” Pieroni offered.

Photo: Luca Cannonieri / GoRunway.com

Man Ray Meets Debbie Harry, Backstage At Gucci

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Beholding the backstage scene at Gucci was something of a serious flashback—and we’re not just talking about the overt references to Surrealist artist Man Ray and Blondie front woman Debbie Harry. There was Pat McGrath, brow bleach in hand, calling to mind her blocked-out arches phase circa Fall 2009, when an all-forehead, all-the-time mandate swept the beauty establishment. While the makeup guru has since joined her face-painting cohorts in ushering the return of full, boyish brows, she wanted a “tougher, stronger look” for Frida Giannini’s 1920′s-skewed presentation—the better to showcase a series of “Art Deco, punk” raccoon eyes. Creating a flawless complexion, McGrath focused her energy on lids, lining the entire eye with Max Factor Kohl Pencil in Black to hold additional pigments like its Smoky Eye Effect Eyeshadow in Onyx Smoke, which was topped with a black shimmer shadow and multiple swipes of its Xperience Volume Mascara.

Like Paul Hanlon at Acne, hairstylist Luigi Murenu was captivated by that phase of life when Debby Harry had bleached-blond hair with black undertones. Conveniently, for Murenu, the new wave rocker’s skunk streaks corresponded well to Man Ray’s avant-garde black-and-white photography. Prepping strands with the John Frieda Luxurious Volume line, Murenu slicked hair back into two ponytails, tucking them underneath themselves and securing them with electrical tape at the base—a way more striking look than a boring old elastic. Then, he used a colored cream makeup to paint black streaks along sleek slide sections, reverting to a gold pigment to create a similar contrast on brunettes. The hair team at Alberta Ferretti was no doubt thrilled when models arrived for the next show.

Photo: Luca Cannonieri / GoRunway.com

Flower Power, Backstage At Prabal Gurung

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If you’re unfamiliar with Japanese artist Nobuyoshi Araki’s work, the retina-burning ombré pink lips at Prabal Gurung were likely a bit of a jarring site. But put in the context of the photographer’s vivid images of exotic blooms, the mouths made perfect sense. “It’s like there is an intoxicating flower coming out of her mouth,” makeup artist Charlotte Tilbury said of the different shades of MAC Lipmix she applied in gradation from deep purple to magenta to fuchsia. “Its a play on darkness and light.” Pouts were kept matte to contrast with dewy, highlighted skin and purposely overdrawn at the corners “as though she’s been snogging,” said Tilbury, pointing out that the key to coloring outside the lines is to use a soft, melted pencil without a sharp tip so you “keep from looking like a drag queen.” To further acheive that delicate balance between looking “sensual, but strong and powerful” at the same time, Tilbury swept an elongated stroke of silver gray cream eye shadow across the crease of models’ lids.

Coiffing star Didier Malige was happy to hone in on the strong and powerful end of that dichotomy, slicking back hair into a middle-parted wet look. “The [Prabal Gurung] woman is super confident. She has nothing to hide,” Malige said, prepping strands with Frederic Fekkai Coiff Extra Control Styling Gel and finger-combing it backward before adding a generous helping of its Brilliant Glossing Sheer Shine mist for added glisten. To set the sleek look, Malige spritzed on Fekkai’s Coiff Sheer Hold Hairspray.

The piece de resistance came by way of Jin Soon Choi’s tasteful touch of nail art. Starting with a base coat of Sally Hansen’s Lacy Lilac lacquer, Choi added a centralized stroke of its Loves Me Not, a shimmering aubergine that’s part of Gurung’s latest polish collection for the nail giant (the three piece range hits stores in April). “I’m calling it a slim silhouette–not a reverse French manicure,” Choi clarified. “I hate that!”

Photo: Luca Cannonieri / GoRunway.com

Freckle-Faced Hippie Chicks, Backstage At Chloé

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If we had to call it right here, right now, spider lashes would be the trend we are most excited about for Fall. We loved them at Alberta Ferretti and ogled them at Lanvin, but it was Charlotte Tilbury’s mastery with the mascara wand at Chloé that really sealed the deal. “It’s a hybrid between Anita Pallenberg and Charlotte Rampling,” the flame-haired face painter said of the look for Hannah MacGibbon’s Fall show, for which Tilbury set out to intermingle Pallenberg’s rock chick vibe with Rampling’s “chicer side of hippie.” That meant a “lived-in” brown eye, courtesy of MAC Cream Colour Base in Dark Brown, which was smoothed across lids while its Eye Pencil in Teddy, a medium brown, was smudged underneath the lower lash line. Then came MAC’s Fibre Rich Lash Mascara in black, which Tilbury heaped onto both the upper and lower lash lines for a “cloggy” effect. (For those of you wondering how to properly sport lower-lash mascara without the risk of pigment residue slowly winding up on your skin, Tilbury recommends dabbing translucent powder underneath the lash line. Now you know.) Finishing touches came in the form of an orange/caramel lip coated with MAC Lipstick in Freckletone and that music festivalgoer staple, freckles. “We’re just putting them where the sun would hit you,” Tilbury said of the small spots she stenciled along the tops of cheekbones and across the nose bridge using MAC Lip Pencil in Hodge Podge.

Luigi Murenu’s middle-parted waves were also reminiscent of the Coachella set. Prepped with John Frieda Luxurious Volume Thickening Blow Dry Lotion and curled with a 2″-iron through the mid-lengths for bend, it smacked of the easy summer hair we’ve been dreaming about since winter set in a long five months ago.

Photo: Luca Cannonieri / GoRunway.com