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August 2 2014

styledotcom Celebrating Yves Saint Laurent, on what would have been his 78th birthday: stylem.ag/1m6aDty @YSL pic.twitter.com/wsdg2Pooy0

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368 posts tagged "MAC Cosmetics"

Taking It Easy, Backstage at ChloƩ

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chloe“If someone looks like they put too much effort in, it’s almost not cool,” said hairstylist James Pecis—that’s especially true if you’re the Chloé woman. “Soft,” “fresh,” and “easy” are just a few of the key words both he and makeup artist Diane Kendal used to describe the brand’s DNA and its aesthetic. For Pecis, that meant forming a side part just above the inner corner of the eye, pulling the right side back and tying it at the nape with a piece of elastic to give the impression of an asymmetrical cut. Texture was created via L’Oréal Professionnel Tecni Art Volume Lift Spray-Mousse, which was applied from roots to ends and blown dry. Sections were then wound loosely around a curling iron for a bit of bend and finished off with Wild Stylers Next Day Hair, a formula that works similarly to a dry shampoo. While the end result appeared quite simple, there was an underlying precision. “All of the parts are made on the right and the hair [swooped over] to the left,” Pecis explained. “It’s very specific, because when the models turn the first corner on the runway, the wind catches in their hair. We have to make sure it opens it up so the cameras can get each girl’s picture.”

This season Kendal reached for a hue well outside the beige family. “Clare [Waight Keller] was saying she really wanted to incorporate violet,” the face painter noted of her discussion with the creative director. Of course, this was no in-your-face purple eye, but an iridescent lilac shade created with a mushroom-colored “greasepaint” and MAC Eye Shadow in Beautiful Iris. For a smoky effect, Kendal used a taupe sculpting cream in the “banana” of the lid and underneath the lower lashes, pulling it out into a subtle feline shape. Next, a gray-blue shimmer pencil was run across the waterline for a brightening effect. Similar to the airy chiffon dresses or cozy, oversize coats (one of which was worn by none other than Sasha Pivovarova) in the collection, the pastel palette employed on the eyes was fiercely feminine.

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde/ Indigitalimages.com

Twin Peaks Meets Blue Velvet, Backstage at Kenzo

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kenzo“We’re taking a classic look and twisting it—a bit like a David Lynch film,” explained mane master Anthony Turner. Inspired by the collaboration between the designers (Carol Lim and Humberto Leon) and the famed director on the sculptural set and music for today’s show, the backstage pro crafted a “Twin Peaks ponytail.” After making a strong center part and securing the hair at the back of the head, he wrapped the band with extensions and “hacked off” the ends with scissors or “men’s clippers,” forming a blunt, severe line. To cancel any flyaways, L’Oréal Professionnel Mythic Oil was smoothed on top.

Another Lynch film, Blue Velvet, obviously served as a reference for face painter Aaron de Mey. He used MAC Chromaline in Marine Ultra on the upper rims, a shade he described as “Yves Klein blue.” His reason for selecting such a vibrant hue: “The [runway] is dark and tough, so this gives it an elevation and illumination.” As for the “fifties” wing shape, it was reminiscent of Sherilyn Fenn’s signature cat-eye in the aforementioned nineties series, de Mey explained. The finishing touch that channeled the cinematic theme were models’ flocked navy nails, whose fuzzy texture and color recalled—what else?—Isabella Rossellini’s crushed velvet robe.

Photo: Indigitalimages.com

Up All Night, Backstage at Missoni

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missoniMakeup artist Lucia Pieroni described the woman at Missoni as “a cool girl who’s been out all night, she’s got her boyfriend’s coat on, and is waiting for the bus around six in the morning.” In the case of today’s show, that coat would involve chevron stripes and vibrant tangerine trim.

The focus was primarily on the eyes—particularly the lashes, where “tons and tons and tons of mascara” was used from the iris to the outer corners on top and bottom to create a spidery, “haywire” effect. For an even more imperfect finish, lashes were pinched together to make them “a bit crooked.” (Some models with sparser fringe received a set of falsies for thickness, just on the outer half of the eyes.) To intensify the clumpy effect, MAC Fluidline in Blacktrack was applied from the middle outward on the upper and lower lash lines in a soft square shape, then blended with a matte, ebony-colored shadow.

“It feels like she’s done her hair herself, but not in front of a mirror,” Eugene Souleiman said of the “imbalanced” topknots. (The Missoni girl likely crafted this while she was waiting for the bus to pull up.) The style was simple enough to create: Loosely secure a ponytail with elastic to create “bagginess,” then pin in place. Since multiple models were dashing from Dolce & Gabbana via car and moped (no time to wait for public transportation), “necessity became the mother of invention,” Souleiman explained. “I love it because it’s a five-minute hairdo.”

Photo: Indigitalimages.com

Do Get It Twisted, Backstage at Marni

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marni“Twisted” was the key word of the day backstage at Marni. Both makeup artist Tom Pecheux and hair pro Paul Hanlon used it to describe the look they created. For Hanlon, he was referring to the strands he plastered to the head—reminiscent of “brains,” “bird’s nests,” or “tree branches.” Consuelo Castiglioni said she was “a bit bored” of the simple styles she’d seen thus far in Milan, the mane master explained, so he crafted something more extreme—a look that might belong in an “enchanted forest” alongside the vibrant furs, floral prints, and feathers incorporated into the collection. He doused hair from roots to ends with mousse before coiling pieces over the top, covering the crown with a stocking cap and blowing it dry. “Basically, it’s the same effect as if you had a towel on your head and you keep twisting it around,” he explained of his technique. The top half was then locked in place with hairspray, but the length was left down and “dry.” Of the finished product he said: “It’s like a wicker basket—you don’t know where the hair stops or starts.”

To give the skin a “waxy” feeling, Pecheux reached for a highlighter, but not in a shade one would normally think to dab on the high planes of the face. Instead of your typical metallic, he employed MAC Cream Colour Base in Breaking Ground (a mauve-y gray) on the lips, lids, and brows. “Under the light it gives [the complexion] a weird tone and texture,” he noted. The products used to contour the cheeks were equally as unexpected as the chunky heels spotted on today’s runway: Lipstick in Siss (a deep nude) and Myself (a rose hue) were used to create an unusual flush. Lashes were left bare, and powder was dusted on sparingly to cancel shine in certain places (such as under the eyes). “Since the hair is so fucked up [meant in the most complimentary sense of the word], we needed the skin to be extremely polished,” he said.

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde; Indigitalimages.com

Golden Girls Go Boho, Backstage at Emilio Pucci

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pucci

“Peter doesn’t like makeup.” It’s a tale we’ve heard before of the artistic director. This season, however, he wanted to “do something fun,” noted makeup artist Yadim. Pulling inspiration from the brocade (Look 43) and beaded pieces in the collection, he crafted a “modern-day Veruschka,” using a gold powder that he wet before gilding the forehead of ten select girls. “That’s where that desert warrior woman comes in,” he said of the metallic treatment. The majority of models were kept rather natural in comparison: MAC Cream Colour Base in Pearl was tapped onto the high planes of the face, a taupe shade was used to gently contour, and a beige shadow was washed across the lids and blended up into the brows before a shimmery brown lipstick was layered on top for shine. To provide definition, a black pencil was drawn along the water line, but not smudged. “This is very precise and strict,” the pro emphasized. Lashes were left bare and cheeks were flushed with Ladyblush, a cream formula, to help the girls “look alive.”

Dundas may have proposed a pony, but for mane master Luigi Murenu your standard tail simply wouldn’t do. To lend a “rock ‘n’ roll” vibe that still felt romantic, he worked Kérastase Mousse Bouffante through strands before blow-drying, then wrapped hair loosely around a one-inch curling iron, leaving the ends out. After the texture was in place, he divided the length into three sections and made a short, low plait. “One, two, and done,” he said, crossing the pieces over one another before tying it off with a band. “There are a lot of collars [in the collection], and this can be tucked inside,” he explained, pointing to the barely-there braid. With Eva Herzigova waiting for him at his station, he succinctly summed up the “strong identity” of the Emilio Pucci woman for Fall 2014: “She’s got a chic bohemian feeling, but she’s no hippie.” That much we know for sure.

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde; Indigitalimages.com