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September 1 2014

styledotcom Models share their fashion month beauty must-haves: stylem.ag/1qNo4R1 pic.twitter.com/WJg47cbpWZ

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28 posts tagged "Minx"

Minx Makes Moves

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In today’s oversaturated market of nail art, gel-polish hybrids, stencils, and stickers, it’s easy to forget that not long ago—ten years, give or take—nails were a pretty slow and steady business. Lacquers in shades of light pink and the occasional red or dark berry dominated nail salons, and French manicures with anything other than the classic white tips were pretty much unheard of. While many newfangled brands have cropped up recently to take credit for revolutionizing this beige reality, that honor really belongs to Minx. Dawn Lynch-Goodwin and Janice Jordan’s brand that Lady Gaga, Beyoncé, and Rihanna helped make famous originated in the idea of a protective coating for your nails and ballooned shortly thereafter with avant-garde patterns and colors. Since its inception, Minx has only been available as an in-salon product, but this week marks its grand entrée into retail with not one but two big initiatives to help make life a little easier for nail obsessives. First comes news that the brand has (finally) created an at-home version of its cult-favorite nail wraps in eight different designs. Called Minx #1, the range includes Silver Moons, Gold Moons, Wild Pink Cheetah, Triangle Tango, Diamond Diabolique, Summer Splash, Technical Tribal, and MinxLusion Chex, all of which just rolled out to Ulta stores nationwide. It’s enough to get you thinking about the wealth of different patterns and prints you could create if you had the wherewithal—which you do now, thanks to Minx’s new Customizer. Simply upload your own motif to its Web site, arrange the layout on both your right and left hand, order, and ship it to a Minx stylist near you, who can then apply the professional overlays for you. It’s a mad, mad manicure world out there.

Photo: Courtesy of Minx

Diet Coke X Minx; Cameron Gets Real About Nutrition; And More…

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To fête the unveiling of Diet Coke’s new “corset” bottle designed by Jean Paul Gaultier, the brand enlisted the help of Minx to create matching nail designs at the event. Swedish nail stylist Frida Selkirk applied custom-made, black fishnet-embellished Minx to the crowd—you know, so their nails could match their beverages. [Minx]

“Everyone needs to find a purpose, and I think mine is to help other people,” says Cameron Diaz, who plans on doing her do-gooding as a nutrition educator. “This project is only in the blueprint stages, but I’m creating a space where I can teach healthy habits that girls can build on. I see women struggling with their bodies because they don’t know how they work on basic levels, starting with nutrition. The more I talk about this with people , the more I realize how much it’s needed. I’m really throwing all of my energy into it.” [Just Jared]

After getting some flack for promoting excessive exercising and poor eating habits, Lady Gaga has taken her workouts private—by purchasing not one but two Soul Cycle spin bikes from the studio. [NYP]

YouTube beauty tutorials are nothing new, but self-taught Nepalese makeup artist Promise Tamang Phan may have found a niche for herself. The Internet’s newest sensation has an uncanny ability to transform herself into an impressive number of celebrities—from Adriana Lima and Scarlett Johansson to Michael Jackson—with the simple swipe of a lipstick bullet. How big has Phan’s strange brand of face-painting become? About 96 million page views big. [Telegraph]

Photo: Courtesy of Minx

Getting Nailed Like Lady Gaga

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After a rousing party to celebrate its official unveiling, Gaga’s Workshop is officially open for business at Barneys. There are limited-edition biker jackets, bangles and cuffs designed by the likes of Pamela Love and Erickson Beamon, and haute chocolate in the shape of the pop star’s legendary Alexander McQueen lobster claw heels, but the main event, as far as we’re concerned, is the collection of limited-edition nail overlays designed by one of Gaga’s go-to nail artists, Naomi Yasuda. We’ve already talked about Yasuda’s flame-inspired tips on this blog, but she’s whipped up a whopping seven collectible decals for your Gaga’s Barneys lair. Included among her faux nail offerings is everything from stud-encrusted black lacquered tips and rainbow-colored geometric patterns to bedazzled, graphic lightning bolts. Slightly easier to wield are her limited-edition Minx overlays, which are available in two different patterns: black and gold squiggles and a black and white tribal print. Sticking them on is almost like watching the Lady herself perform “Paparazzi” at the VMAs—minus all the fake blood, of course.

Photo: Courtesy of Barneys

Backstage At McQueen, “A Little Fantasy” Goes A Long Way

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If the lace masks at Sarah Burton’s show for Alexander McQueen looked familiar, it’s because anyone who made it to the wildly successful exhibition celebrating the house’s late namesake designer at the Met this summer has seen something like them before. “The idea came from the masks we created for the McQueen exhibit,” confirmed Guido Palau, who dreamt up another series of similar headgear with Burton for Spring. “People expect a little fantasy from this show,” Palau pointed out, which he delivered by weaving tight, half-inch-thick rings of braids all around models’ heads. “It’s like a wig wrap, but I wanted it to look more embellished,” he explained—which happened to be the complete opposite of Peter Philips’ M.O. “It’s almost like a sculpture,” the famed face painter said of the full-body muting technique he employed, applying a continuous wash of Chanel Pro Lumiere foundation on faces, limbs—anywhere skin was showing. “It’s all the same color; we wanted to make sure everything was covered,” he said, taking the season’s monochrome makeup trend to the next level. While Philips finger-pressed foundation into lips as well, there was one area of the face that he enhanced: the brows. “We tried bleaching them, but it looked too alien,” he said, opting instead to flatten arches, coating them in the same latex-based glue he used only a few hours earlier at Chanel. “It puts some life back inside those masks.”


The real embellishment was left to Minx co-founders Dawn Lynch-Goodwin and Janice Jordan. Back in London, manicurist Marian Newman told us that Burton had given the women four words to use for inspiration when conceiving a series of different nail overlays for her to choose from for the show; today came the big reveal. “Water, mother-of-pearl, shell, and sea foam,” she said, applying the six winning designs to models’ tips. Using three different bases of pink, beige, and ivory, Jordan and Lynch-Goodwin layered different combinations of Minx in holographic gold and silver on top to create “organic, random” layered patterns. “It took over 1,000 man hours,” Jordan proclaimed. If the crowd at Centquatre wanted fantasy, they no doubt left satisfied.

Photo: Luca Cannonieri / GoRunway.com

Missoni Gets Minxed

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We told you they were coming, and here—fresh off the catwalk in Milan—are a few of the custom nail overlays Minx designed for Missoni yesterday. “The base of all nails was Minxlusion and many of the Missoni patterns have a Minxlusion-esque thread running through them, so it matched the theme perfectly,” Minx co-creator Dawn Lynch-Goodwin explained of the 20 different patterns she dreamt up in a blue, yellow, and red palette. Nail guru Marian Newman presented the designs to Angela Missoni and Margherita Missoni the day before the show and after a reported love fest, the women made their selections so that the nails “interpreted” the fabrics used in the show, rather than replicated them. To help save time backstage as 18 of the 37 models were running late from a previous show, Newman and her team actually applied some of the appliqués onto nails as the girls stood in line to hit the runway! Anything in the name of perfectly pro tips. Which is your favorite?

Photo: Luca Cannonieri / GoRunway.com