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April 21 2014

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8 posts tagged "Natasha Poly"

EXCLUSIVE: L’Oréal Paris Inks A Deal With Natasha Poly

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Since making her grand entrée into the world of high fashion with a turn on the Emanuel Ungaro runway in 2004, there’s been no stopping Natasha Poly. The Russian-born beauty with the almondine eyes and high cheekbones has walked for everyone who is anyone and nabbed campaigns for Dolce & Gabbana, Alberta Ferretti, Givenchy, Jil Sander, and Gucci fragrances in the process. But as far as Poly’s concerned, she’s only just made it big. “I’ve been doing modeling for almost ten years and I’ve been working so hard to reach this moment,” she says of being named L’Oréal Paris’ newest spokesperson. “My dream came true. I’ve reached a point where I can actually send a message to people, saying to them, ‘You’re worth it—we’re worth it.” A L’Oréal user since early childhood—”my first exposure was the shampoos. The quality and the smell was so special,” she recalls—her first major beauty contract has perhaps been a long time coming; Poly wanted to be a professional makeup artist before she took up the catwalk full time. “I’ve always loved cosmetics and I always need to have my products backstage at fashion shows,” she says, products like L’Oréal’s Color Riche Lipstick in Red and its Voluminous Million Lashes Extra-Black mascara. “I curl my eyelashes and then apply this mascara; it really opens up the eyes.”

Poly’s first order of business for the French brand will be serving face time for its cult-classic Elnett hair spray—a fashion week essential—and its Preference hair color collection. An acolyte of Paris-based colorist Christophe Robin, Poly has been dyeing her hair varying shades of flaxen for the past five years and is diligent about post-dye job maintenance. “In my emergency kit, I have a mask from Kérastase,” she admits, mentioning that haircare and skincare are “the most important stuff” when it comes to keeping up appearances. “It’s my job—I always need to look good,” she says—even when she has to walk in back-to-back shows in four different cities. To keep her face from showing the wear and tear of the extra mileage, Poly swears by L’Oréal’s Youth Code Lumière. “It refreshes your skin. I massage it in every morning.”

Product swag aside, Poly is just generally excited to be a part of team L’Oréal, which already includes fellow supermodels Doutzen Kroes, Bianca Balti, Claudia Schiffer, Liya Kebede, and Barbara Palvin. “It’s beauty that’s approachable to everyone,” she says of the brand’s reach, “and it’s giving power to women of the world to be iconic and powerful and confident.” Watch the behind-the-scenes video for Poly’s first campaign above, and look out for her on the Versace runway tonight.

Photo: Courtesy of L’Oréal Paris

Natasha Poly Does Pirelli—And Her Own Makeup

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While models spend most of their time being dressed, coiffed, and primped by other people, some girls have strong opinions about their own self-expression. Natasha Poly is one of those girls. The runway regular who recently posed for Mario Sorrenti’s 2012 Pirelli calendar actually unearthed old Helmut Newton tear sheets to give to hairstylist Aleksandra Sasha Nesterchuk as inspiration for the impressive, coiled updo that she sported to last night’s launch party for the high-end photo spread-turned-planner. “She sent me pictures of the dress in advance,” Nesterchuk says of Poly’s collared Tom Ford gown, which immediately got Nesterchuk thinking of something swept up. “For some reason I just thought of this style—it’s nonconventional with the dress and has a little quirk,” she says of the sleek, rolled coronet that stemmed from archival snaps circa the late seventies—and happens to bear a striking resemblance to the slicked-back style Guido Palau helmed backstage at Yves Saint Laurent’s Spring 2011 show. “It’s a little Marc Jacobs, actually,” Nesterchuk suggested, shouting out Kiehl’s Clean Hold Styling Gel, Kérastase Volumactive Mousse, and L’Oréal’s Elnett hair spray as the products responsible for the “not wet but not dry” texture she was after. The final results were all about collaboration, though. “[Natasha] did her own makeup—she loves to do her own makeup,” according to Nesterchuk. That’s one hell of a smoky eye for an amateur face painter. Thoughts on the look?

Photo: Will Ragozzino/BFAnyc.com

Suddenly Saturated

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If we had to pinpoint one overarching beauty trend from the Spring shows, it would be wet hair. From Victoria Beckham, Prabal Gurung, and Alexander Wang to Bottega Veneta, Giambattista Valli, Lanvin, and Chanel, saturated strands were the coiffing establishment’s backstage technique of choice. Whether or not the soaking-wet look will be a hit off the runway was a topic of conversation among beauty junkies on both sides of the Atlantic. “Why would I want my hair to look like that?” a friend asked at the start of the Paris shows, when it became clear that hairstylists like Guido Palau and Sam McKnight wouldn’t be putting down their bottles of mousse, gel, and hair spray anytime soon. It’s a valid question, considering most women go to great lengths to keep their hair from looking greasy and damp. Then again, we’re almost positive she’d want her hair to look like Natasha Poly’s does in the new issue of Spanish Vogue. The man behind the blond beauty’s soaked-through strands, Living Proof co-founder Ward Stegerhoek, says the trick is to use a product that gives the effect of an oily residue but that isn’t an oil at all. “I used American Crew Grooming Cream, because it looks like grease and is wet and shiny like grease, but it’s completely water soluble, so it will rinse out of the hair without the same problems of a real grease.” Still unconvinced of the style’s wearability? Let us know below.

Photo: Greg Kadel for Spanish Vogue, November 2011

Natasha Poly Advocates For Pantone Pouts

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Vogue China just debuted its Fall collections book which, interestingly enough, stars Natasha Poly having a particularly Spring beauty moment. Matte lips in a range of off-kilter colors popped up on both sides of the pond this season, making their first appearance in New York at Richard Chai’s “Japanese surfer girls” show where models like Lindsey Wixson and Emily Baker trotted out onto the runway with flat-finish blue, and purple mouths. The evolution of the statement lip continued in London at Mary Katrantzou thanks to makeup artist Val Garland, who used a treasure trove of metallic MAC Pigments to create lime, aqua, and tangerine mouths (Garland repeated the trick in Paris at Thierry Mugler making gold-green her single color of choice). It’s not the most translatable look off the catwalk but there is a method to the madness, should you want to give it a go. The trick is blocking out lips with a color-neutralizing cream base like MAC Lip Erase or its Paintstick in White before applying whatever wacky lipstick shade your heart desires. To be fair, Natasha’s yellow pout does look kind of killer with her all-black ensemble. Would you go there?

Photo: Clockwise from top left, Luca Cannonieri / GoRunway.com; Willy Vanderperre for Vogue China, Collections F/W 2011; Luca Cannonieri / GoRunway.com

Is Brown The New Blond?

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Between Christophe Robin’s color dabbling at Hakaan (he gave Shirley Mallmann lilac-gray streaks, turned Milica Blagojevic a Rihanna red, and Iris Strubegger flaxen in one show) and the much-discussed platinum blondes at Balenciaga, we can barely keep up with the hair color heroics currently taking shape in Paris. Yesterday’s Givenchy presentation offered yet another mane milestone, when a typically tawny-haired Natasha Poly opened Riccardo Tisci’s show as a brunette! Robin can take credit for this dye job as well, which was reportedly commissioned specifically for the show—Poly’s exclusive Paris engagement this season (should an exclusive gig as the house’s Spring campaign star be in her future, we would not be surprised). What do you think of the transformation?

Photo: Monica Feudi / GoRunway.com; Luca Cannonieri / GoRunway.com