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August 31 2014

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84 posts tagged "Orlando Pita"

Carolina On The Mind: A Herrera Beauty How-To

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“Classic Carolina” is how Herrera’s glam squad described its inspiration at the designer’s Fall show. For makeup artist Diane Kendal, that meant timeless beauty. All the quintessential elements were there: defined eyes courtesy of a precise etching of black cream eyeliner drawn close to the lash line and slightly flicked out; a romantic pink cheek blended into models’ skin with MAC’s forthcoming Blush in Angel; and lips painted a sweet shade of sheer rosy-brown with a slick of its Lipstick in Prince Noir. Full brows and a wash of clear gloss on lids added that extra bit of runway glamour. Hair was similarly demure, thanks to coiffing star Orlando Pita, who prepped strands with MoroccanOil’s Styling Cream before applying heat and creating a soft side part. For his next rick, Pita gathered tresses into a low ponytail, which he tucked into itself and then pinned to secure. “It’s boyish in front,” he said of the style, which was deliberately pulled off models’ necks to showcase an abundance of collars in the collection. “I want it to look neat,” Pita added. Herrera seems to be slowly edging into slightly edgier territory, though. For only the second time in her career, the designer requested dark nails—two thin coats of CND’s Dark Ruby, to be precise. But the point was to help bring an even more “luxurious, expensive” feel to the clothes, not to go goth. Don’t get it twisted.

Photo: Luca Cannonieri / Gorunway.com

Brows You Can “Feel” Backstage At Derek Lam

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“It’s not day makeup,” Tom Pecheux joked of the metallic eye and heavy brow he concocted backstage at Derek Lam. Nor should it be; a lackluster look simply wouldn’t do for a Lam collection, which Pecheux rightly pointed out has the unique ability to be “casual, sophisticated, feminine, and minimal without being boring.” Translated into face-painting terms, this meant flawless matte skin, prepped with Estée Lauder’s new-for-summer Idealist Even Skintone Illuminator and a nice helping of its DayWear moisturizer, dramatized with an iconic eye. “It’s minimal but slightly severe,” Pecheux remarked of the August Sanders photography-inspired metallic silver and charcoal lids he was painting using two new Estée Lauder Eyeshadows from his Modern Mercury product range, due out this fall. Next, Pecheux turned his attention to a “powerful eyebrow,” filled-in with coordinating shades of Lauder’s Automatic Brow Pencil. “You can really feel them,” Pecheux—a staunch bleached-brow opponent—emphasized of the arches. Cheeks were contoured slightly with a few swipes of Estée Lauder’s Bronze Goddess Soft Duo Bronzer, while pouts were toned down using an as-yet-unreleased peachy beige matte lipstick. “A nude lip makes the eyes pop more,” Pecheux remarked. So does sleek, pulled-back hair, which coiffing star Orlando Pita was flat-ironing and spritzing with his T3 Control Hairspray before brushing it backwards and using a wide, pure-bristled toothbrush for extra smoothness. “It’s a classic schoolgirl look that typically would be secured with a barrette,” Pita described of the style. “But we’re not using barrettes here,” he continued, pointing out that he’s over that whole “it’s supposed to look like the girl did it herself” movement in runway hair. See how the three-sectioned ‘do stays perfectly symmetrical and perfectly in place? Try doing that yourself. He dares you.

Photo: Luca Cannonieri / GoRunway.com

The Art Of Wearing Fake Bangs 101

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The clip-on bang: Proper application can elude even the most savvy beauty connoisseur, yet its appeal is undeniable. Brow-grazing fringe one day, fringe-free the next—what’s not to like? Hair that looks a far cry from real, that’s what. But it doesn’t have to be that way, according to Orlando Pita. “I always love using hair pieces because you don’t know if it’s fake or if it’s real,” the stylist told us yesterday backstage at Doo.Ri where he was fastening fringe to models’ hairline to extend the designer’s long silhouettes. What’s his secret? “You need to take a bit of the side of the bangs and style it into the girls’ own hair.” He did that by spritzing already thinned out strands with By Byron Spirulina Hairspray and blowing them dry so they fluidly blended with the rest of the hair. Another tip? Use a comb instead of a brush when applying heat to achieve maximum flatness. “It’s the volume that makes it look fake,” Pita explained. Now you know.

Photo: Yannis Vlamos / GoRunway.com

Grace Kelly Incarnate, Backstage At Elie Saab

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Backstage at Elie Saab’s Spring Couture presentation today, it all started with Grace Kelly. “She was never too overdone, and Elie wanted the girls to look very young and fresh,” hair guru Orlando Pita said of the “wholesome” side-slung chignons he created by prepping strands with his signature T3 Plump before drying, side-parting, and fashioning a loose braid behind the ear, which he tucked into itself. “It’s supposed to look effortless,” he added. That’s not necessarily a word we’d use to describe the late Princess of Monaco’s always put-together appearance, but MAC senior vice president Gordon Espinet clarified, “It wasn’t about making the girls look like her; it was more about making them look fabulous without a lot of fuss. No muss, no fuss.” That meant a flawless, dewy complexion, the kind of adolescent gleam we find ourselves trying to muster every day. Espinet achieved it here by prepping models’ skin with MAC’s much-loved Care Blends Essential Oils mixed with its Strobe Liquid Lotion. Then came a light application of foundation courtesy of MAC Mineralize Skinfinish—”it doesn’t cover; it just makes skin look awesome,” Espinet enthused of the color-correcting compact. A flush, “not blush,” created using cream color bases and a slathering of tinted lip conditioner, gave cheeks and mouths a natural rosy glow, while a slashing of black mascara on the top lashes added just a hint of drama. “It’s almost makeup that you don’t have to look into the mirror to do,” Espinet says. “You can feel it go into all the right places.”

Photo: Umberto Fratini / GoRunway.com

Orlando Pita’s Brand Of Punk Premieres Backstage At Giambattista Valli

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The Paris hair-color chronicles got yet another entry yesterday at Giambattista Valli, where coiffing legend Orlando Pita gave three platinum blonde models shocks of pink dye. “Hair in fashion has gotten too boring,” Pita offered of the shade experiments that have been one of the bigger stories to come out of the last week of shows. “We’ve seen long wave extensions on women of all ages for years, and when you’re young, it’s the time to experiment and have fun. Look at what happens when you take risks. Agyness Deyn cuts her hair off, dyes it white, and her career takes off.”

For the girls who did not get streaks, Pita dialed up another style from the annals of angsty youth: “The idea is that the girl shaved the back of her hair off and it grew back in its true color,” he said of the darkened undersides of slick, brushed-back ponytails, which got a shot of sleekness and shine from L’Oréal Professionnel Texture Expert Fixing Mist 4 Hairspray. To take Pita’s idea of punk and make it modern, makeup artist Val Garland went with super-clean skin brightened with moisture, rather than an illuminating cream. “The skin is sculpted through lighting only,” she said, noting that since the hair was quite severe, she used a drugstore brand moisturizer called Egyptian Magic on lids, lips, and cheekbones for a beautifully polished, slightly futuristic glossy effect—a go-to Garland technique that the face painter debuted at Catherine Malandrino in New York. Hard-edged eyes in either black or white completed the look, with blondes getting a white graphic line under their lower lash lines with white mascara and bleached brows and brunettes receiving a black line and black mascara. Both Pita and Garland sightings have been a bit of a rarity in Europe this season, but their originality is always a welcome addition to the backstage beauty discourse.

Photo: Luca Cannonieri / GoRunway.com