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April 21 2014

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223 posts tagged "Pat McGrath"

At Viktor & Rolf, They Can Be Heroes—Just For One Day

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“She’s been through a lot,” hairstylist Luigi Murenu quipped of the Viktor & Rolf woman for Fall. “The rain, the dust. They’re heroines—modern Joans of Arc!” While most people would take that reference and conjure images of the French patron saint’s heavy fringe, Murenu went in a different direction completely, opting to channel his embattled protagonist as she was dismounting from her horse in all of her windswept sweaty glory. Coating strands in John Frieda Luxurious Volume Thickening Mousse for a wet, piece-y texture, Murenu fashioned deep side parts and braided sections on both sides of the hairline to the back of the head, before joining both plaits into a ponytail and braiding through the ends.


If you’re thinking that Pat McGrath’s completely red faces were meant to illustrate Murenu’s galloping warriors’ subsequent sunburnt skin, don’t. It was much simpler than that. “They’re stepping out of a red camera gel light,” McGrath explained of the jarring and yet somehow totally gorgeous makeup look. “I’m taking that to a place that’s really literal”—and how. What provided the gorgeous bit here was the fact that McGrath accentuated models’ natural assets instead of blocking them out—the wash of scarlet pigment that was brushed over the entire complexion was removed from brows, which were brushed up and sculpted; lids were carved out using a sheer dusting of smoky shadows; and a thin scrawl of black liquid liner was applied before a row of extra lashes, which were curled for extra impact and a nice dose of drama. Equally impressive was how McGrath got Constance and co. back to bare post-show by calling in the big guns. “We used five different theatrical makeup removers,” she told us when we ran into her later in the day.

Photo: Luca Cannonieri / GoRunway.com

Braids And Bad Girls, Backstage At Lanvin

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“The first looks out are pretty strict,” Guido Palau noted of the Fall Lanvin collection backstage at the show. “Alber [Elbaz] wanted to put ease and femininity back into the clothes. This is a case in point of downplaying extravagance with really simple hair.” So Palau created soft ponytails he gathered above the nape of models’ necks and braided them into long plaits. Prepping hair with Redken Wool Shake 08 gel-slush texturizer, the coiffing star rough-dried tresses, pulling pieces out around the hairline to avoid a look that was “too polished.”


Makeup artist Pat McGrath also shied away from precision. “It’s all about the imperfections here,” McGrath said of the squared-off eyeliner job she placed on the outer corners of models’ lids using CoverGirl’s SmokyShadowBlast Eye Shadow in Onyx Smoke. “Alber wanted the girls to look like they did it themselves—but these are bad girls,” McGrath suggested of the sultriness’ effect, which was completed by multiple whips of CoverGirl’s LashBlast Fusion mascara for a “cloggy” effect on both upper and lower lash lines. McGrath’s secret for pulling off this season’s nod to spider lashes? “Just keep going with the wand!”

Photo: Luca Cannonieri / GoRunway.com

Pretty In Pink, Backstage At Nina Ricci

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“Very pretty, very French—very Nina Ricci,” Redken creative consultant Guido Palau summed up of his effort backstage at Peter Copping’s Fall show, which had a slight sixties feel in its soft flowiness devoid of any hard edges. “Dream hair” was how Palau described the half-up, half-downs that were coated with Redken Velvet Gelatine 07 Cushioning Blow-Dry Gel, dried, and set in large Velcro rollers for volume and bounce. After brushing out strands, he gathered small side sections beneath a touch of height at the crown and secured with bobby pins to hold.

“It’s Portrait of a Lady, Vanessa Beecroft, Tamara de Lempicka,” makeup artist Pat McGrath added of the evening’s inspirational muses, referencing de Lempicka’s Art Deco paintings and the frequent appearance of “those lips” for her own decision to add a salmon pink pout to the equation. “It’s ultra-feminine,” McGrath said of the bold brows, brown mascara, and bright mouth she painted on using a mix of pink pigments meant to match a fabric swatch in the collection. Manicurist Yuna Park embarked on a similar mission, mixing up a bottle of lacquer with the dress Arizona Muse wore as she swanned down the runway in look 16 in mind—a moment that happened to be one of our favorites in the entire show.

Photo: Luca Cannonieri / GoRunway.com

At Balenciaga, Blondes Still Have More Fun

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Although we pointed out on this blog that many of Guido Palau’s “Balenciaga blondes” from Spring have embraced chestnut browns for Fall (Brit Maren, most notably), the coiffing star seems unfazed by the transition. With Nicolas Ghesquière’s blessing, Palau asked colorist Christophe Robin to turn to the peroxide bottle once again for Balenciaga’s Fall show, ordering bleach jobs for five girls before the presentation and relying on a purposeful cornsilk casting to “make a strong statement on the runway” at the get-go. Formerly flaxen beauties Aline Weber, Kori Richardson, and Lisanne De Jong were among the first ten models out, and their super-bright strands—that were center-parted, coated in Redken Satinwear 02 Ultimate Blow-Dry Lotion, teased at the crown for lift, and pulled pack into a very low-lying ponytail—did indeed set a convincing tone for the show. “It’s very modern, easy, sophisticated,” Palau said of the style, although jury’s out on how long the word “easy” will factor into the equation once their roots start to grow in. That being said, the hair color registered as electric on the runway, its vibrancy helped along by über-dark brows filled in and—get this—dyed brown in a few instances by makeup mistress Pat McGrath, who has demonstrated that her power with arch transformation goes way beyond a mastery of blocking them out. Not only did McGrath build them up at Balenciaga, she gave four girls—Kasia Struss and Arizona Muse among them—a blue “brow bar” scrawled across the nose bridge for an added touch of graphic chic. What can’t this woman do?

Photo: Monica Feudi / Feudiguaineri.com

Brow Wars: Pat McGrath Speaks Out

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We have been quietly polling fashion’s most noteworthy face-painters over the past few weeks of shows about where they stand on Fall’s bleached vs. full brow debate, as arches are now big and bushy after spending the better part of the past few seasons totally non-existent. The most exciting moment in this journalistic experiment came tonight when we finally got a moment with Pat McGrath backstage at Nina Ricci (more on that in a bit). The Queen of the Blocked-Out-Brows, as we have fondly come to call her, McGrath pretty much caused the all-forehead, all-the-time resurgence with her showstopping Fall 2009 peroxide performances backstage at Balenciaga and Prada. But seeing as how she too has embraced bold, visible arches this season at Prada and Dolce & Gabbana, we had to find out where she stood on the issue—a question she made short work of: “As a makeup artist, it’s so important to change things. See how you would’ve liked it if I did full brows for ten years! It’s about challenging yourself. [Bleaching brows] might not mean ‘you’ can do it—but it’s not about ‘you’ all the time. It’s about making fashion exciting.” In a word, boom!

Photo: Clockwise from top left, Marcio Madeira at Balenciaga, Fall 2009; Luca Cannonieri / GoRunway.com at Dolce & Gabbana, Fall 2011; Luca Cannonieri / GoRunway.com at Prada, Fall 2011; Greg Kessler at Prada, Fall 2009