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August 27 2014

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65 posts tagged "Paul Hanlon"

Mile-Long Locks Materialize at Moschino

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Dreadlocks are nothing new—they were worn by ancient civilizations in Africa and Asia, and the style is closely tied (if not intrinsic) to the Rastafarian movement. Celebrities (such as Lady Gaga and Lauryn Hill) and designers even commandeered the look for the red carpet and the runway. Hairstylist Sam McKnight created two versions for Chanel: one in 2012 and the other for Fall 2014. And only hours ago Jeremy Scott sent his own towering iteration down Moschino’s menswear catwalk. Models like Lindsey Wixson, Leomie Anderson, and Soo Joo Park sported piled-up twists and belly-button-grazing braids by pro Paul Hanlon, along with bikinis emblazoned with the world’s flags and soda-pop-themed sweatshirts. We like to think of the hair at Scott’s show much like his designs: tradition turned on its head.

Photo: Yannis Vlamos / Indigitalimages.com

Do Get It Twisted, Backstage at Marni

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marni“Twisted” was the key word of the day backstage at Marni. Both makeup artist Tom Pecheux and hair pro Paul Hanlon used it to describe the look they created. For Hanlon, he was referring to the strands he plastered to the head—reminiscent of “brains,” “bird’s nests,” or “tree branches.” Consuelo Castiglioni said she was “a bit bored” of the simple styles she’d seen thus far in Milan, the mane master explained, so he crafted something more extreme—a look that might belong in an “enchanted forest” alongside the vibrant furs, floral prints, and feathers incorporated into the collection. He doused hair from roots to ends with mousse before coiling pieces over the top, covering the crown with a stocking cap and blowing it dry. “Basically, it’s the same effect as if you had a towel on your head and you keep twisting it around,” he explained of his technique. The top half was then locked in place with hairspray, but the length was left down and “dry.” Of the finished product he said: “It’s like a wicker basket—you don’t know where the hair stops or starts.”

To give the skin a “waxy” feeling, Pecheux reached for a highlighter, but not in a shade one would normally think to dab on the high planes of the face. Instead of your typical metallic, he employed MAC Cream Colour Base in Breaking Ground (a mauve-y gray) on the lips, lids, and brows. “Under the light it gives [the complexion] a weird tone and texture,” he noted. The products used to contour the cheeks were equally as unexpected as the chunky heels spotted on today’s runway: Lipstick in Siss (a deep nude) and Myself (a rose hue) were used to create an unusual flush. Lashes were left bare, and powder was dusted on sparingly to cancel shine in certain places (such as under the eyes). “Since the hair is so fucked up [meant in the most complimentary sense of the word], we needed the skin to be extremely polished,” he said.

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde; Indigitalimages.com

Beauty Time Warp

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doutzenThe sixties are alive and well this season and everyone, from New York to London to Milan, is getting in the spirit. Eugene Souleiman channeled Françoise Hardy at Peter Som; Pat McGrath was inspired by Britt Ekland at Gucci; Mia Farrow was the icon on Paul Hanlon’s mind at Moschino; and today at Versace, Guido Palau crafted a slight bump in the hair—a surefire marker of the very groovy decade. When it comes to appliances, however, we don’t usually expect a throwback. White Sands, a haircare company, developed an attachment for your blow-dryer that acts like the “salon hoods or bonnets” of yesteryear, setting curls or locking in moisture from treatments, hands-free. Model Doutzen Kroes even appeared to be wearing a similar contraption on set this week. Will the concept take off like Mary Quant’s miniskirt or the bikini post-Beach Party? If the runways are any indication, going back in time just may be the wave of the future.

Photo: Instagram

One Part Linda Evangelista, One Part Jean Seberg, Backstage at Moschino

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FASHION-ITALY-MOSCHINOInstead of McDonald’s fries, Hershey’s chocolate bars, or Budweiser beers, hair pro Paul Hanlon served up wigs with an “at-home haircut” feeling backstage. His iPad was filled with reference photos of Mia Farrow, Jean Seberg, and Edie Sedgwick, but he did give the “all-American icons” Jeremy Scott incorporated into his first collection for Moschino some thought: “There’s those SpongeBob Square things [on some of the clothes],” Hanlon said. One beauty editor piped up, “You mean SpongeBob SquarePants?” His reply: “Yeah, him.” The faux strands weren’t meant to look real—the main reason being budget, but also out of practicality. “It lasts for seven minutes, why not just go for it?” he said of the look. Hanlon’s special touch was yanking the wigs back so that the choppy fringe rested directly on the hairline. “Otherwise it could look a little salon,” he explained.

“There’s a slight Linda Evangelista inspiration with these straight, very boyish brows,” said makeup artist Lucia Pieroni. The perfect skin was influenced by Peter Lindbergh’s photos, which she re-created using a light base of foundation, highlighter (MAC Eye Shadow in Vanilla), and a wash of Cream Colour Base in Pearl on the lids. Eyes were emphasized along the socket with Pro Longwear Paint Pot in Groundwork. Lips were slicked with a range of nude lipsticks depending on each model’s skin tone. “This is very simple and beautiful,” Pieroni said, referring to the face. “It’s all going on everywhere else.” I think the decision not to compete with Chester Cheetah, Ronald McDonald, and Mr. SquarePants was a wise one.

Photo: Getty

A Beach Day in the Midst of a Blizzard, Backstage at Proenza Schouler

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proenzaThe surfer girl reemerged backstage for Proenza Schouler’s Fall 2014 show—but not in the matte, dreaded, ocean-soaked sense. Hair pro Paul Hanlon tried that look at one of the multiple tests, but with the “acid colors” and “insane prints” it was ultimately “too much going on.” So he decided on something cleaner, but not “robotic.” Seeing as models’ strands were already doused with a considerable amount of product from a full day of shows, Hanlon misted hair with Bumble and Bumble Prep before putting in deep side parts and sweeping it behind the ears, bending the mid-lengths and ends ever so slightly over an iron. After his backstage team made each girl look perfect, Hanlon “destroyed” the style at the last minute, breaking it down with Brilliantine (a polishing cream), pulling out bits, and artfully crafting flyaways. “My fingers take the edge off, almost like they had a little hat on,” he said.

Diane Kendal provided a dewy sheen by applying moisturizer under and over any base products. The makeup pro then dabbed brown “grease” on the lids and lower lash lines before removing it with more moisturizer and a cotton swab, leaving behind a subtle residue. MAC Cremeblend Blush in Posey was tapped onto the apples of the cheeks, and lips were slicked with Siss (for girls with darker complexions) or toned down with foundation. Lashes were curled, but not coated with mascara—an aesthetic choice we’ve seen Kendal and other artists make multiple times this week. The reasoning: “Not doing mascara is more modern; as soon as you apply it, lashes look pedestrian.” I’ll consider giving my go-to tube a day off.

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde; Indigitalimages.com