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April 18 2014

styledotcom A little bit of music to get you ready for the weekend: stylem.ag/1gMx87J

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64 posts tagged "Paul Hanlon"

New Wave a New Way, Backstage at 3.1 Phillip Lim

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phillip-lim“When I saw the collection, it reminded me very much of who I was as a teenager,” said makeup artist Francelle Daly. Apparently, the face painter had Siouxsie & The Banshees, Nina Hagen, and Culture Club on repeat, as those were her references for the look at today’s show. Daly focused mainly on creating a squared-off eyebrow—taking the shape straight across and lending a bit of a curve to keep arches less “robotic” and more “feminine.” Lids were left naked, lashes were curled and coated with NARS Larger Than Life Lengthening Mascara, and a combo of Nico and Zen blush was lightly dusted in the contours of the cheeks with a powder brush. Nails were painted with Crossroads, an eggplant-like lacquer from the designer’s forthcoming polish collection with the beauty brand.

For hair pro Paul Hanlon, Bryan Ferry and David Bowie acted as inspirations, along with eighties Esprit catalogs and photos taken by Herb Ritts and Bruce Weber. Fellow stylist Didier Malige was also on Hanlon’s mind. “I’m a big fan of him,” he said. Hanlon began by working Moroccanoil Volumizing Mousse through the mid-lengths and ends, and misted Root Boost in front before blow-drying. A generous amount of oil was used all over for separation and a “sweaty” effect. “I put a lot on the roots so that you see the comb marks,” he explained. A thicker curl cream was applied to the top section in order to mold the hair back off the face before it was pinned and fixed in place with strong-hold hairspray. “It’s what they used to do [in the eighties], but completely deconstructed,” Hanlon said. I think we can all agree that a literal interpretation of this particular era wasn’t missed.

Photo: Sonny Vandervelde; Indigitalimages.com

Untouched Beauty, Backstage at Prabal Gurung

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prabal-beautyThe inspiration for Prabal Gurung’s collection started in Mustang, a “secluded kingdom” high in the Himalayas in Nepal where the designer went trekking during a visit home. “What I really loved about the whole place was the incredible colors and incredible way of dressing—it’s almost like sportswear, because they have to layer everything,” he explained. The spirit of Gurung’s woman, however, remains the same season after season, no matter where his travels take him: “It’s a femininity with bite,” he said. For Fall 2014 he moved away from the formaldehyde-dipped strands and neo-pastel pouts created for Spring, and opted for “great skin,” “beautiful hair,” and “tactile clothes.” That element of strength key to his aesthetic comes courtesy of “natural femininity and natural beauty.”

Makeup artist Diane Kendal kept with the spirit of the clothes by using MAC Cosmetics Face and Body foundation to even models complexions, forgoing powder to create a dewy finish. Just the apples were flushed with a ruddy-colored cream blush, and Pro Sculpting Cream in Accentuate was dabbed along the tops of the cheekbones and across the center of the lids to highlight. Eye Kohl in Fascinating (a white pencil) was used on the lower waterlines to brighten, while Pro Sculpting Cream in Coffee Walnut was used to contour the crease and hollows of the cheeks. Brows were brushed up, filled in with a corresponding shadow (like Omega, Bark, or Concrete) and set with wax for a “bushy” finish. To tone down any redness in the lips, Kendal applied a touch of foundation to models’ mouths.

Manicurist Jin Soon also focused on simplicity, using two of the three forthcoming Sally Hansen nail lacquers in the designer’s limited-edition polish line out in September: Himalaya (a nude) and Rupee Red (a bold burgundy). The majority of girls received clean, sand-colored paint jobs, while five had a straight, vertical line drawn down the pointer, middle, and ring fingers.

Directing my attention to the designer’s mood board at the hair and makeup test, mane master Paul Halon pointed out a photo of a Nepalese woman with straight, glossy, center-parted strands—his jumping off point for the style. To re-create it for the modern, urban consumer, he used Chi Volume Booster at the roots “to give hair guts” and applied Silk Infusion to the ends before blowing everything straight with a round brush. For movement, he pulled the length up into a loose bun, spritzed it with Infra Texture Hair Spray, heated the makeshift knot using a diffuser, and finally blasted it with a shot of cold air. “When you undo it you get a little kink, but I don’t want to use a tong because it [starts to] look cosmetic very quickly,” he said. The hair was then topped off with a silver chokerlike necklace designed by Gurung, or pulled back into a low ponytail with a black band. “When they walk, it’s very light, very airy,” he said of the final result—almost like a brisk mountain breeze was blowing down the catwalk.

A Play-by-Play at Prabal Gurung

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prabal-gurung“We’re incorporating the untouched world into the city,” Prabal Gurung explained of the beauty look for his Fall 2014 collection. For Paul Hanlon that meant straight, center-parted strands taken from a photo of a woman in Mustang, a district of Nepal. Makeup artist Diane Kendal used MAC Cosmetics to create “flushed” cheeks, dewy skin, and defined brows for that mountain-fresh feel. Here, how it is all came together at the hair and makeup test: click to view the slideshow.

Photos: Ibra Ake

Testing 1, 2, 3: Behind the Scenes at Prabal Gurung

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mac-cosmetics

For Prabal Gurung’s first print campaign, he revealed the image not in a glossy, but via social media—tempting his followers with pieces to the final puzzle on Instagram. So it comes as no surprise that he’s teasing his Fall 2014 collection in the same manner—posting a photo with the caption “Inspired by Mustang” (a village high in the Himalayas in Gurung’s native Nepal). “I go [home] once a year—it’s the only way to keep me grounded,” he said. The designer also blasted out a mood board (although it’s not the mood board), with another clue as for what’s to come: “Seeing red for Fall 2014.”

Thanks to MAC Cosmetics, who snuck me into the hair and makeup test, I got a preview of the look. Last season gave us retro pastel lips and formaldehyde-dipped strands, but today you’ll see hair (by Paul Hanlon) and makeup (created by Diane Kendal) that’s much more, as Gurung explained, “nonchalant.” The evening was over almost as quickly as it began, as both pros nailed the look right off the bat. “I can’t believe how fast it was!” he noted. I won’t spoil the surprise with any more insights, but I will say that after seeing the goods, I’d actually consider taking a trek just to see where this beauty and fashion journey began. And trust me, the only hiking I do is from show to show.

Get the full report here on Beauty Counter after the models hit the runway.

Photo: Ibra Ake

Weekend Wear, Backstage at Rag & Bone

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rag-and-bone“This is Saturday morning makeup,” Gucci Westman said of the yé-yé girls- and Katharine Hepburn-inspired look at Rag & Bone. “It’s about fixing what you had on the night before.” If you’re not Joan Smalls (who closed the show), you likely don’t wake up after a Friday evening out on the town looking anything close to this—at least I don’t. But Westman says it’s possible to turn last night’s liner into this graphic shape by applying Revlon ColorStay Crème Gel Eye Liner in Black with a skinny brush and perfecting the shape by tracing over it with the Liquid Eye Pen. “Pointed Q-tips clean up everything,” Westman said as she sharpened the wing on a model’s eye. As for the rest of the face, things were rather pared-down in order to achieve the “tomboy” aesthetic. The Rag & Bone woman doesn’t wear blush, she explained: “It feels too finicky.” Instead, she contoured and highlighted in all the usual places (cheekbones, bridge of the nose, cupid’s bow, etc.). Any pink or red tones in the lips were canceled using a beige cream shadow (on darker complexions) or a white liner pencil for fair-skinned girls.

Aside from having his three-month-old son by his side backstage, hair pro Paul Hanlon was excited about working with the designers for the first time. “What I love about them is that they’re pushing [the hair and makeup] bit by bit every season,” he said. To achieve a lived-in texture, he loaded strands with Schwarzkopf OSiS+ Grip mousse “to take the cleanliness out” and raked Rough Rubber paste through the roots for “separation and dirtiness.” Dust It was added through the mid-lengths and ends to provide a “dreadlock-y” texture before hair was pulled into a low ponytail. Hanlon tucked the ends through the elastic to create an “urban sports knot” and finished with hair spray. “She hasn’t washed her hair all week; she’s been out; she hasn’t got a hairbrush or a comb; she’s just yanked her hair back with a band and it got all tangled and knotted,” he said of the muse. Yep, sounds about right.

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde, Indigitalimages.com