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July 25 2014

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30 posts tagged "Prabal Gurung"

A Lipstick for Anti-Lipstick Types

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Albeit Matte Stylo Stick-cropLipstick has never been easy for me. The bright zing of red, orange, or pink on the mouth has never been my style. Oh, trust me, I’ve wanted it to be—there’s something effortlessly cool and quirky (traits I deeply admire) about the saturated lip effect. But I’ve never been much good at it, you see. Finding the right shade is challenging because, as I’ve learned, the wrong tone of crimson or coral can really make you appear like you have caught a bad stomach bug, or perhaps even worse, are trying oh-so-desperately hard to wear a certain “look.” The odds of me wearing lipstick became slimmer after I had two kids, and the fear of kissing off any kind of vivid pigment on their chubby cheeks further convinced me to stick to simple, clear lip balms (or maybe a tinted rose if I was feeling bold). But I can’t deny the siren appeal of the rainbowlike bullets. The spring runways were full of optimistic inspiration, too, particularly in the form of matte orange shades seen at Rag & Bone, Prabal Gurung, and Fendi, where a pinky-orange made me blink twice at its beauty. Sigh, if only.

Well, OK, full stop on that pining. As luck would have it, a perfumer friend of mine passed along a sample of Albeit Matte Stylo Stick in Geranium, a new release for fall from Anthropologie. I admit, it sat in my handbag untouched for almost a week. But the other day, I traced on the rosy coral and was completely transformed. The tip of the crayon is conveniently shaped to conform to the contours of your mouth, making it ridiculously easy to apply on the go (no fancy lip brush required). The papaya-rich, nourishing formula is an appealing cross between a lip balm and lipstick, so it melts into your skin for a complexion-flattering finish that doesn’t fade away too soon. In fact, if you blot and reapply, the color lasts a good three to four hours. As for remembering to wear it in the first place? I’ve discovered that time-honored secret shared among lipstick girls: When your color looks this good, that’s all the motivation you need.

Preserved Glamour at Prabal Gurung

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Prabal Gurung

The backstory behind the “glass” box on the designer’s runway and the hair and makeup that was built around it goes something like this: “It’s almost like [the girls] aren’t human—as if they’ve been preserved through time, and then, for this one moment, they are let out to feel the reality of the world,” hairstylist Paul Hanlon said without stopping to take a breath. So how exactly does that translate into a look for real, live models?

For maquillage master Charlotte Tilbury that meant creating perfect, pore-less skin using liberal amounts of concealer on the lids, around the eyes, nose, and mouth. Then, topping that with a full face of MAC Mineralize Moisture Foundation and a dusting of finely milled Prep + Prime Transparent CC Powder in Adjust. The cheeks, brows, and lashes were left bare so the lips could take center stage. To create the illusion of a more voluptuous, Irving Penn-inspired pout, the outside of the mouth was slightly overdrawn with lip pencil. Tilbury filled in the middle with three custom-blended shades—Pepto pink, acidic lilac, and bright orange with a kick of red—made using various combinations of Lipmix in White, Crimson, Burgundy, and Orange. The finishing touch was a coffee-colored, feline flick on the upper lash line that was reminiscent of Marilyn Monroe in her last sitting with Bert Stern.

Hanlon’s interpretation of Gurung’s tale required “lots of product” for shiny, “surreal” strands that looked as if they’d been dipped in formaldehyde. He started by making an almost surgical right side part and taming any flyaways with Schwarzkopf OSiS+ Softn’ Straight (a smoothing balm). Next, he doused the hair from the roots to the neck with the line’s Freeze strong-hold hair spray and flattened it against the head by hitting it with heat from a blow-dryer. Wavy “S” shapes were molded into the remaining length using Flatliner heat-protecting serum and a straightening iron. Hanlon misted on Sparkler (a shine spray) to lend a “vinyl” finish to the look.

Eight polishes—three of them being pearlescent pastels developed by Gurung in conjunction with Sally Hansen (available in March)—were used to coordinate with the colors in his collection. And while I hate to say, “I told ya so” (OK, so I don’t exactly hate it), finger painter Ana-Maria used a forthcoming matte top coat over three-quarters of the nail and a glossy lacquer across the tips to create a textural twist on the French manicure. Looks like some beauty trends will forever be sustained.

Photo: Ivan Lattuada/Indigitialimages

Celebrating The Little Black Makeup Look

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PrabalOnce you worked your way around the fifty-plus gowns and frocks that lined the halls at the Mona Bismarck last night for the MAC-sponsored Paris opening of André Leon Talley’s SCAD Little Black Dress exhibition, the gallery spilled into a final space that was the stuff beauty dreams are made of. In a wood-paneled room that looked out onto the venue’s lush grounds hung towering face charts featuring seven MAC-designed makeup looks—with their corresponding product breakdowns—created to complement seven of the show’s standout pieces. “MAC lives fashion 365 days year,” Estée Lauder Group President John Demsey explained of the special addition to the show, emphasizing that more and more, the brand’s sartorial ambitions are branching out beyond its connections to the Fall and Spring ready-to-wear and couture collections to include collaborative capsule ranges with tastemakers and scholastic pursuits that center around style. “MAC has always been referred to as the brand in black, so the little black dress and the little black lipstick sort of went hand in hand,” he elaborated. And let’s not forget its little black eye shadows, eyeliners, and mascaras; where would fashion be without MAC’s fan-favorite shadow pots in Smoulder and Carbon; its eye kohl in Feline; and its cream Fluidline in Blacktrack?

While “[wearing] black is a blank canvas” for makeup, according to Gordon Espinet—the brand’s vice president of makeup artistry, who conceived the individual looks on display—there are certain things to keep in mind when face-painting for an all-black ensemble. “Makeup has no rules; it’s highly personable,” he asserts. “But I tend to go with this: The more embellishment there is on the clothing, the less embellishment should be on the face.” Words to live by.

Altuzarra

Photo: Courtesy of MAC Cosmetics

Jessie Ware Nails It

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British singer-songwriter Jessie Ware’s stock is on the rise. In addition to receiving rave reviews for Devotion, her debut album that comes out this month, Ware has booked the Big Three of summer festival slots and will perform at Coachella next weekend, followed by Glastonbury in June and Lollapalooza in August. This week, Ware is in New York for two sold-out shows at the Music Hall of Williamsburg and Webster Hall—and last night’s launch party for Paper magazine’s “Beautiful People” issue, for which she plays cover star. A sucker for eyeliner and big gold hoops, as we learned in Style.com’s Spring Beauty Guide, the songstress displayed a penchant for nail art, too, as she posed on the red carpet with a V-shaped moon manicure—or a “skinny V,” as nail guru Jin Soon Choi called a similar design she created for Prabal Gurung’s Fall show. Thoughts on Ware’s graphic black-and-white manicure motif?

Photo: Cindy Ord/Getty Images

Seeing Red

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Last Spring, blue made a strong case for eye makeup color of the season, as liners and shadows in shades that ranged from aqua and turquoise to cobalt and navy turned up on the runways in full force. And it’s proved a hard habit to kick for Fall, too, as makeup artists like Diane Kendal and Hannah Murray have turned to midnight and robin’s-egg iterations of the hue at shows like Jason Wu and Topshop Unique, respectively. But there’s another color that’s staking a claim to the season, and it’s a rather unexpected one at that. “There’s a sort of seventies feeling to it,” James Kaliardos said of MAC’s forthcoming Rusted Red cream eye shadow that he blended onto lids backstage at Diane von Furstenberg, which followed a similar move by Charlotte Tilbury at Prabal Gurung, where she used the ruddy color to create a fresh, young, stained effect on eyes. In their more saturated outings, cranberry lids have showed up at Cynthia Rowley, courtesy of Romy Soleimani and her trusty compact of Stila Eyeshadow in Pigalle; at Altuzarra, where Tom Pecheux swiped MAC’s metallic raspberry eye shadow in Loves Lure underneath models’ lower lash lines for a “spooky” feel; and just yesterday at Gucci, where Pat McGrath borrowed a deep claret from Frida Giannini’s collection and turned it into a greasy, bold eye, replete with bleached brows for a molten finish. We have a feeling it won’t be the last we’ll be seeing of the color in Europe.