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August 28 2014

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177 posts tagged "Redken"

Wing Women: A Breakdown of the Beauty Look at Atelier Versace

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versace-atelier“Donatella said she wanted to do something different,” explained face painter Pat McGrath. “She wanted couture-modern, but also something graphic, aerodynamic, and fun.” McGrath realized this vision via a thick, two-toned wing in peacock teal. To provide dimension, she applied a lighter shade to the center of the lid and swept a darker hue up toward the temple. A delicate veil of shimmer powder, faux fringe, and “tons of mascara on top lashes only” completed the eyes. The rest of the face remained neutral: Groomed brows, light contouring on perfect skin, and a pale lip balanced out the dramatic shadow. Ditto for nails, which were “natural pale” but ultra-shiny.

The hair was high-gloss, too. “This chignon is very un-Donatella,” conceded hair guru Guido Palau. To lend topknots edge and structure, the pro employed Redken Hardwear gel to shape models’ strands. He then moved the classic style closer to punk territory by using Forceful 23 hairspray and ironing the bottom few inches into a geisha-style flourish. Stella Tennant stood out and received a customized look sans extensions. “Along with the makeup, it’s very rock ‘n’ roll,” noted Palau. “This is a strong woman.”

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde / Indigitalimages.com

Working Girls, Backstage at Christian Dior

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DiorGone was the “precious” beauty of seasons past, and in her place was the urban, working woman (the Dior version, at least), summarized Guido Palau. Channeling the theme, the hair was all business. First, it was blown smooth with Redken Satin Wear 02, then the area from forehead to crown was shellacked with Forceful 23 hairspray in order to mold the strands tight to the head. “It’s a sculptural look, but the hair will move on the runway,” he said.

“This is a woman of today; she’s in the real world,” noted makeup guru Pat McGrath of the “street and slightly masculine” muse. The striking eyes were crafted using theatrical latex paint in cerulean blue and earthy khaki green—a material artists rarely employ because it requires impeccable timing to layer products over top. After “playing from 9 p.m. to midnight” at the test the day before, McGrath had the process down to a science: The graphic shape (“not a wing—we’re moving away from that,” she noted) was sketched on with a pencil, filled in with the paint, then a pigment in a similar tone was gently pressed into it. “Gradually, the latex swallows the pigment so you get this ultra-glassy feel—like a mirror,” she explained. In addition to colored mascara that matched the shade swathed across lids, the finishing touch was a sprinkling of glitter that reflected greenish gold or blue tinged with lavender. (For formulas that are less temperamental, we like Dior’s forthcoming 5 Couleurs shadow palette in Carré Bleu or Jardin. Or add a hint of office-friendly sheen with the Skinflash Radiance Booster Pen on the high points of the face.)

Between McGrath’s sparkly eyes and the slashes of vivid color seen on the catwalk, I don’t think the Dior customer could ever come down with a case of the Monday blues.

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde; Indigitalimages.com

Midnight in Paris, Backstage at Lanvin

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lanvin“The girls look like a pen-and-ink sketch,” Pat McGrath said of the painterly onyx liner and blunt lashes on view at Lanvin. She applied a black cream formula with a brush, smudging it along the upper rim. In contrast, the lashes were cut clean and square. The theme of the maquillage was “not being afraid to play,” she explained. “The whole idea of the eye and the lash is about being brave and strong.” And this major lid statement didn’t get lost beneath the bevy of hats in the collection. “Don’t forget, when you’re sitting down, you’ll still see the whole face,” McGrath noted.

To reflect the nighttime sensibility evoked by the feathers, decadent furs, and fringed gowns in the lineup, Guido Palau crafted a wet knot. “With the lighting and smoke, you just feel like the hair wouldn’t be dry—it would almost be too romantic,” he said. Palau doused strands with Redken Guts 10 Volume Spray Foam before raking the length back with his fingers and twisting it into a messy bun, placing it high or low depending on whether the model was donning a marabou-trimmed chapeau. For a glistening effect that played off the graphic pendants or hints of sparkle in the clothes, he finished with a generous spritz of Shine Flash.

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde; Indigitalimages.com

Seamless Continuity, Backstage at Jil Sander

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jilsanderThree words both Pat McGrath and Guido Palau used to describe the hair and makeup at Jil Sander: “Very, very natural.” Both artists let each model’s character take center stage instead of creating an entirely new persona. McGrath lightly contoured lids with a taupe shadow, brows were groomed, and lips were layered with balm. “Simply beautiful,” she said of the finished face.

Palau staked his claim on the two sinks backstage, using them to wash each girl’s hair with Redken Hair Cleansing Cream Shampoo. Strands were left to air-dry before they were spritzed with Pillow Proof Two Day Extender, a dry shampoo, for additional texture. Despite the designer departing her eponymous label for the third time, the house’s signature look holds strong.

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde; Indigitalimages.com

Hot Stuff, Backstage at Roberto Cavalli

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roberto-cavalliA ring of fire surrounded a pool of water in the center of the circular runway, but the collection at Roberto Cavalli wasn’t Hunger Games-inspired, although Look 36—a gown with flames rising from the hem—might have said otherwise. In fact, there was no muse at all, noted Guido Palau, who doused strands with Redken Shine Flash for a “greasy” vibe before raking them with his fingers into a chignon. He then tied off the length with elastic before personally coiling and pinning all of the models’ “messy knots” into place. The bits he pulled out in front for texture were set in place with Forceful 23 hairspray. “When it gets too overcomplicated, it doesn’t feel sexy anymore,” he said of the relatively simple style.

The makeup by Diane Kendal, however, was a bit more dramatic. The face painter crafted “smoky, extended eyes” that were squared off at the outer corners to avoid a “catty” shape. (There were plenty of felines dangling from models’ necks in pendant form, courtesy of the designer.) A combination of black and brown liners was used in order to create a sense of depth. “Black can be too hard,” Kendal explained. A champagne shadow from MAC was tapped on the center of the lids, a powder blush was rubbed into cheeks with fingertips, and lips were topped with Siss, a flesh color.

Keeping with the nude nail theme that is already quite rampant for Fall 2014, MAC senior artist Keri Blair blended two lacquers, Quiet Time (a cool, grayish hue) and Thimbleweed (a warm, peachy shade), to create a polish that flattered a range of skin tones. “It feels a little bit dirty,” she explained. “It’s a rock ‘n’ roll nude.” Standard beige clearly wouldn’t do—the Cavalli woman needs a manicure worthy of pyrotechnics.

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde; Indigitalimages.com