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July 31 2014

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15 posts tagged "Rick Owens"

A Mixed Bag, Backstage at Rick Owens

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rick-owensSpring provided us with grit-faced step dancers, but this season I was met with a motley crew of models—ranging from real women employed by the designer to current catwalkers (like Hanne Gaby Odiele and Alana Zimmer) to models beyond the ripe old age of 21 (such as Kirsten Owen and Hannelore Knuts). It was yet another powerful message this week that age does not define beauty, or for that matter, fashion.

Makeup artist Lucia Pieroni skipped harsh edges and black shades, opting for varying tones of brown that were customized to suit each woman. The real challenge was making everyone feel comfortable within the context of very little makeup, she explained. Luigi Murenu revived hairstyle hits from seasons past: the “dandelion heads” of Fall 2013 and the “dew rags” hailing from Spring 2009, not to mention a few shaved heads thrown in for good measure. “We have to look at the faces in the mirror and work with it—we’re taking a compassionate approach,” he noted.

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde; Indigitalimages.com

Getting Better With Age: Jessica Lange Is the New Face of Marc Jacobs Beauty

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jessica-lange“I don’t put things into demographics or ages, I’m inspired by great women,” said Marc Jacobs at a soiree in Paris last night celebrating the European launch of his beauty line and its new face, 64-year-old Jessica Lange. “I love women with a strong voice and vision. I like people who are dynamic and creative. And again, women who indulge in fashion and beauty as part of their life, but it’s not their whole life.” Lange’s voice carried through the cloud-filled air at the designer’s Fall 2014 show, and yesterday evening the lyrics to “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” resounded through a room projected with a film starring the acclaimed actress shot by David Sims (which will appear in the window of Sephora on the Champs-Élysées come March 6). As I interviewed Jacobs and Lange’s lips and smoky eyes (the work of face painter Diane Kendal) panned across the walls, he explained: “It was important to set precedent just like we do with our fashion shows. What we’ll do with beauty is that we want to surprise, we don’t want to fall into a formula. We want to be able to respond to our inspirations at any given moment and go with it, and over time it will tell the story that beauty isn’t for this person or that person, it’s for anyone who wants it.”

It appears that a number of others are on the same page this week: NARS Cosmetics’ signed Charlotte Rampling; Angela Lindvall made an appearance at Balmain alongside modern-day supers like Karlie Kloss and Joan Smalls; and Rick Owens cast not only his employees but catwalk legends like Kirsten Owen, Ann Oost, and Hannelore Knuts. Perhaps the fashion world is becoming a little less enthralled by the barely legal (and often years away from legal), hot young things and like their women how they like their wine: aged to perfection.

A Bottega Veneta-Rick Owens Hybrid

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ritaora

There was a mash-up of the beauty variety last night at The Box in London. Rita Ora’s look was reminiscent of the soft “Jodie Foster in Taxi Driver” curls that Guido Palau created at Bottega Veneta’s Fall 2013 show and the sculptural, frizzy wigs Luigi Murenu coiffed for Rick Owens’ Spring 2013 collection. Two heads, as they say, are better than one.

Photo: Luca Cannonieri/ Gorunway.com; Getty Images; Michele Morosi / InDigital | GoRunway

An Eye-Catching Video From i-D; Rihanna’s Still Doing the Doobie; and More

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Yes, there are twenty-six ways to wink. i-D celebrates all of them (and 33 years of their signature cover pose) in a video featuring everyone from Cara Delevingne to Rick Owens.

Taryn Manning of Orange Is the New Black arrived on the red carpet for the International Emmy Awards sporting platinum strands. It looks as if the brunette-to-blond
red-carpet epidemic is set to continue.

In other hair news, Rihanna’s doobie is still going strong. She hit Drake’s concert in L.A. last night wearing the same Dominican hair salon-inspired style she sported at the AMAs.

Teens are often masters of invention, and when given a bottle of nail-polish remover, the possibilities extend far beyond neatening a chipped manicure. Two 19-year-old roommates in Liverpool helped robbers clean dye-pack-splashed bills with this beauty product. [The Cut]

True Grit, Backstage at Rick Owens

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rickowensAll season long makeup artists and hairstylists have been riffing on “real girl” beauty backstage—leaving strands and complexions purposely au naturel so that the consumer can more easily imagine herself wearing the clothes. But at the end of the day, as Tom Pecheux put it at Balmain, supermodels are still supermodels—and the rest of us are just “real.” But the unlikely lineup of forty step dancers from Washington, D.C., and New York City-based crews (Momentum, Soul Steps, Zetas, Washington Divas) at Rick Owens was an exuberant celebration of authenticity. “The whole point was to make them look and feel pretty,” said Owens. “If a girl didn’t feel comfortable with something, we didn’t do it—we wanted them to feel powerful.”

To emphasize their dynamic movements, hair pro Luigi Murenu designed four different styles. The first being a fluffy texture that he aptly dubbed “dandelion heads,” created by straightening strands, “biting” them with a crimping iron, and brushing out the kinks with a Mason Pearson to get a “cotton candy-like” finish that flew with each aggressive stomp. The other three included a slicked-back chignon (which he formed using Kérastase Vinyle Nutri-Sculpt and hair spray, sometimes fitting the dancer with a “nunlike” veil), stick-straight hair with center parts, and low, sleek ponytails.

“What they’re doing is so ‘wow’ that it’s about them and the clothes—it’s not really about this bit,” face painter Lucia Pieroni said of the “fresh” makeup. “There’s no particular thing on everybody,” she added. Pieroni used a light layer of foundation and concealer, filled in arches where needed, and moisturized lips with a clear balm—tailoring the look to each dancer. The end result, although stripped down, relayed an important message: When individuality is this spectacular, why attempt to conform?

Photo: Alessandro Garofalo / Indigitalimages.com