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August 29 2014

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99 posts tagged "Rihanna"

Why We’re Swapping Our Red Lipstick for Purple This Fall

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Blame it on Lorde, blame it on Joan Smalls, and, like so many big beauty trends, blame it on Rihanna, but we’re really digging a purple lip lately. Finding the right hue, however, that offers moisture, staying power, and serious color has proved to be a significant challenge. Enter: Smashbox Be Legendary Lip Lacquer in Ultra Violet and Always Sharp Lip Liner in Violet. When paired together, this dynamic duo makes for the perfect electric plum pout (similar to the one spotted on Brit pop singer, Melissa Steel). I’ve found that filling in my lip with the self-sharpening liner (yes, it amazingly comes to a perfect point with a twist of the cap) is the best way to create a budge-proof base. Topped with this non-sticky gloss infused with staining pigments and glossy-finish pearls, and the result is anything but shrinking.

Smashbox Always Sharp Lip Liner, $20, Be Legendary Long-Wear Lip Lacquer, $24; smashbox.com and sephora.com

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Photo: Getty

DIY Rihanna’s Epic Ponytail

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Real-life beauty trends don’t always reflect what we see on the runways, but when it comes to Rihanna, ordinary rules don’t apply. The bona fide fashion icon recently stepped out in NYC sporting cutoffs, a fistful of designer bags, and a superlong ponytail similar to the ones we spotted at Chanel, Kenzo, Valentino, and Bottega Veneta. Selena Gomez tried the trend, too, tying off her sleek pony with a simple black ribbon at the Teen Choice Awards last week. We’re guessing faux strands played a part in both cases, but anyone can go to great lengths by following the steps hair pro Guido Palau took backstage at Bottega: Blow-dry damp hair with a smoothing lotion (like Redken Align) and use a flatiron for sleekness. Part as desired (Rihanna and Selena both divided down the center) and secure your tail at ear level with an elastic. For extra fullness, wrap the base with extensions—hiding the evidence with a small section of hair wound around the band. Want a blunt, clean finish like Selena’s? Hack off the ends with scissors. To get RiRi’s undone look, pull a few pieces out around your face, give the crown a tug for volume, and leave the ends intact.

Photos: Getty

5 Crazy Lip Colors Worth Trying

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This spring brought us two jewel-toned lip looks that were seriously striking: Joan Smalls’ amethyst pout at the Met ball in Manhattan (seen below) and Rihanna’s emerald mouth at the iHeartRadio Music Awards in L.A. Ever since, my seatmate, fellow lipstick lover, and Style.com’s social media editor, Rachel Walgrove, and I have tried tracking down similar tubes to no avail. Today, however, we discovered the holy grail of offbeat, opaque colors: Obsessive Compulsive Cosmetics “Unknown Pleasures” Lip Tars. Our favorites from the range that dropped online today: Vain (a dark indigo with green undertones reminiscent of RiRi); Technopagan (a metallic purple bordering on navy that’s the closest thing we’ve found to Smalls’ shocking violet); Pagan (a blackened plum comparable to another makeup move the model and Style.com/Print cover girl made last year); Covet (a camel color that has normcore written all over it); and Manhunter (a glittery red that is the next best thing to Saint Laurent’s ruby slippers). Commitment-phobes, be warned, these matte, liquid formulas have serious staying power and pack a major punch of pigment that practically requires paint solvent to take off, but our motto when it comes to mouthing off: Go big or go home.

$18 each; occmakeup.com

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Photo: Courtesy of BFAnyc.com

Frosted Lips Are Back—Even Rihanna Agrees

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Mention the word frosted to any lipstick-wearing woman who was alive in the ’90s and she’ll likely note it as one of her biggest beauty mistakes. But this sparkly finish—much like overalls, jellies, and scrunchies—is staging a serious comeback. I’ve seen shimmery brown bullets reminiscent of the era’s original makeup mainstay, MAC Spice, at many a fall product preview. (A trio of new tubes to try: Topshop’s Metallic Lips in Mercurial, Mescaline, and Armour.) And when Rihanna’s latest Viva Glam campaign hit my inbox minutes ago, I knew the deal was sealed. Sporting Day-Glo green curls and a metallic mauve pout, the bad girl who never shies away from a seemingly unwearable trend is bound to make iced cappuccino-colored lips the next big thing…again.

MAC Cosmetics Lipstick in Viva Glam Rihanna II (warm mauve with silver frost), $16, Lipgloss in Viva Glam Rihanna II (cool mauve with red frost), $15; available September 11 at maccosmetics.com. All proceeds benefit men, women, and children living with HIV/AIDS.

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Rihanna’s Nipples Aren’t the Only Things Being Banned

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Rihanna is not safe for children—at least that’s what the U.K.’s Advertising Standards Authority thinks. The CFDA fashion icon’s campaign for Rogue, her latest fragrance, where she’s depicted propped up against the champagne-colored bottle wearing only underwear and high heels, has been deemed “sexually suggestive” and, reports WWD, should only “appear with placement restriction.” In other words, bad girl RiRi won’t be making appearances in the general vicinity of a playground anytime soon. This isn’t the first time her ads have sparked controversy—in the Middle East, the boundary-pushing star’s sternum-baring pink satin robe in the image for Reb’l Fleur was photoshopped closed for Kuwaiti newspapers. But in Rihanna’s defense, isn’t being “sexually suggestive” a prerequisite for any perfume ad? Recalling scents that aren’t fronted by a half-naked female poses a significant challenge. Somehow, I just can’t imagine a woman who hit the red carpet recently wearing nothing but fishnet and Swarovski crystals hawking her eau in a turtleneck.