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July 25 2014

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16 posts tagged "Rochas"

Flashback Friday: At Long Lash

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willyFlashback Friday is a feature on Beauty Counter in which we pore over the pages of our favorite glossies from decades past in search of a little modern-day makeup and hair inspiration.

The Model: Willy van Rooy

The Moment: Full Fringe

The Motivation: With the rise of Kardashian and Ko., faux lashes have lost a little of their Old Hollywood appeal. And admittedly, we’ve never been that adept at gluing on fake fringe. This season, however, we may just have to step up our skills. Makeup artists are lashing out on the reg—from Pat McGrath at Gucci and Versace to Lucia Pieroni at Rochas. In lieu of reality TV, however, we plan to look at the runways and shots like this British Vogue image for beauty inspiration. The photo was captured in 1967, but judging by what’s trending on the Fall 2014 catwalks, we doubt anyone would bat an eyelash if we said this was snapped in the past few weeks.

Photo: David Bailey for Vogue U.K., 1967; courtesy of www.supermodelobsession.tumblr.com

Fringe Benefits, Backstage at Rochas

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rochasTo say that makeup artist Lucia Pieroni was lashing out backstage at Rochas was an understatement: She was piling on the faux fringe, three lashes per eye. A full set was placed on the top, the ends trimmed off and then stuck back on in the center above the iris. Another false lash was layered on top of that for thickness. Pieroni didn’t skimp along the bottom, either: A set was cut in half and overlapped in the middle. “It’s supposed to be a little messy,” she noted. While the fringe was certainly full, there wasn’t any black liner or shadow used to “hide a multitude of sins,” just a shimmery champagne shadow across the lid and a taupe for shading (both from the forthcoming Clé de Peau Beauté Eye Color Quad in 303). Cheeks were dusted with a bronze-hued blush for “freshness,” and lips were polished off with a flesh tone.

While Pieroni employed a few artificial elements to achieve the “sixties, dolly” look, hair pro Luigi Murenu kept things rather pared-down and simple. “It’s about purity and tact,” he explained of the “sensitive” waves. After applying L’Oréal Professionnel mousse through strands and blowing them dry, he wrapped the mid-lengths around a curling iron. The ends were straightened with a flat iron and the top was kept smooth; the look was polished off with Kérastase Elixir Ultime the Imperial. “As much as women want natural hair, they want quality,” Murenu said. Yes, we want to have our cake and eat it too.

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde; Indigitalimages.com

Romantic Imperfection, Backstage at Rochas

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rochas-crop“I’m so bored of nice—just over it in a big way,” said the mane man backstage at Rochas, Eugene Souleiman. “[Hairstylists] need to loosen up and live a little.” And loosen up he did, bringing what he referred to as a “couture” sensibility to ready-to-wear hair. The “over-brushed” updos were based off a look he created for Spring 2012 (which featured a fifties egg shape), but this season Souleiman “wanted to make the head and feet do the same thing.” In other words, the Helena Bonham Carter-like styles were designed to flutter like the feather-duster flats and heels. In order to not torture the models’ strands too much, he pinned a teased bun form to the backs of their heads to act as an anchor, then misted all over with Wella Ocean Spritz to lend a “chemically processed” matte finish. Next, he randomly curled pieces with a half-inch curling iron, made tiny braids, and flat-ironed bits before brushing through them and creating a French-twist-like roll in the back (which he would later pull apart). The remaining sections were wrapped around the sides and front, forming a gentle halo of fuzz. Souleiman said of the end result: “It’s chaotic, but it’s beautiful.”

As for makeup artist Lucia Pieroni, she played off the iridescent fabrics and the catwalk music, which began with what sounded like drops of water hitting a hard surface. “It’s like when the Little Mermaid stays out of the sea for too long—she can’t live above ground, so she goes a bit hollow-eyed,” Pieroni said of the dusky tones that were wrapped around eyes. For a dewy base, she prepped skin with Clé de Peau Beauté The Serum, and then applied the deep purple, taupe-y plum, and pink shades from the forthcoming Eye Color Quad in 212 on the lids and lower lash lines, diffusing the pigment with a small blush brush. Cheek Color in 1 (an earthy hue) was dusted lightly along the sides of the face, and lips were slicked with Enriched Lip Luminizer in 226 (launching next Spring). For a “wet” finish, she dabbed Egyptian Magic on cheekbones, lids, and brows to catch the light, similar to the strands of multifaceted, opalescent beads draped twice around models’ necks.

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde / Indigitalimages.com

Blue, Still In Review

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The pre-fall shows are often a good indication of what’s to come when the Fall shows commence next month. After a jam-packed day of appointments and presentations yesterday, however, they also seem to signify that some Spring trends have serious staying power. We are specifically referring to the blue eye makeup movement that left a lasting impression on the fashion set back in September—and on Marco Zanini, it would appear. The Rochas creative director adopted a marine mandate at his pre-fall presentation, asking makeup artist Silvana Belli to compliment his luxe brocade fabrics, which were occasionally accessorized by knit beanies, with an opaque wash of creamy aqua pigment, like Maybelline’s Eye Studio Color Tattoo 24HR Cream Gel Shadow in Tenacious Teal. Belli dragged the bold, stamped-on color across model Maja Salamon’s lids from her upper lash line to her brow bone, stopping just short of mingling the makeup with her actual brows. A deliberate eschewal of mascara kept the focus squarely on the bolt of blue—and the clothes, of course. Will cobalt, midnight, indigo, and cerulean prevail through February and March, too? We’ll know in a few short weeks. Watch this space.

Photo: Courtesy of Rochas; Courtesy of Maybelline

At Rochas, Fabrics So Gorgeous, “You Kind Of Want To Wear Them On Your Mouth”

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There are certain collections that lend themselves to strong beauty looks, and under Marco Zanini’s tenure, Rochas is definitely one of them. “There are these incredible rosebud-colored patterned florals towards the end [of the show]; you kind of want to wear them on your mouth,” Clé de Peau creative director of makeup Lucia Pieroni said at Zanini’s Spring outing, where lush fabrics were a huge part of the story. The other conversation piece? Pieroni’s flat-finish cerise mouths.

“I’m obsessed with lips at the moment,” the makeup artist joked, having already gifted us with one of the month’s best last week in Milan. Giving skin a pastel, luminescent finish courtesy of a few swipes of Clé de Peau’s Luminizing Face Enhancer in #11, Pieroni dusted lids with the gold color from its forthcoming Eye Color Quad in #209 Sapphire and brushed up brows, leaving lashes without mascara. Then came those pouts, painted with a blend of Clé de Peau Extra Rich Lipstick in R1, “a beetroot red,” according to Pieroni, and R2, “a pillbox red,” which she mixed together and topped with a bit of its Blush Color Duo in Pink for a mattified texture. “Matte to me seems quite modern,” she said, dragging a cotton swab around the edges of the mouth to ensure a soft-focus effect, “as though they’ve really been sucking on a lolly.”

It wasn’t the first look she and Zanini tried, but it was the one that stuck. “The music’s very California, and we went through the process of having the girls look sun-kissed, but they looked too much like a Dutch painting with those hoods,” Pieroni elaborated, motioning to the silk visors-turned-headscarves that Zanini commissioned from the French couture house Lemarié. “She’s a romantic dreamer who does not go out into the sun,” Zanini chimed in of the accessories, which left Wella global creative director Eugene Souleiman very little to work with.

“A ponytail is a little boring, but logistically, it was the only thing we could do,” Souleiman said somewhat begrudgingly, leaving his mark on the look by giving models what he called “premium hair.” “It’s really, supernaturally straight, ” the coiffeur explained, stretching strands with a blow-dryer, coating them with Wella Professionals Shimmer Delight Shine Spray, running them through an iron, and gathering lengths into a low ponytail that he pulled out a bit from the top of the elastic to create a voluminous, pseudo bob beneath the bonnets. “It’s maximized,” he admitted of the end result, “but so subtle it’s not vulgar.”

Photo: Luca Cannonieri / Gorunway.com