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July 30 2014

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27 posts tagged "Sally Hansen"

DIY Stella McCartney’s “Superhero” Nails

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stella-resortIf there’s one thing we can expect at every Stella McCartney show, it’s neutral nails. Light pink or nude—you’d be hard-pressed to find a bottle backstage that competed with the designer’s clothes. And for Resort, the situation was no different. Manicurist Madeline Poole painted catwalkers’ fingertips with Sally Hansen’s forthcoming Miracle Gel polish in Bare Dare, but created “superhero” nail art inspired by one of the quirky patterns in the collection. “I zoomed in and blew up different aspects of the masks to create an abstract design,” said Poole. “I don’t like to do anything too complicated—a graphic that’s big and bold always communicates better.” Here, the pro breaks down how to get the look (no cape or superhuman skills required).

1. Push back cuticles using Sally Hansen Instant Cuticle Remover and an orangewood stick.

2. Gently polish the surface of nails with a buffing block, mist with water, and scrub with a brush. Complete the prep process by wiping fingertips clean of any residue with polish remover.

3. Paint the thumb and pinky finger with two coats of a solid color. (In this case, Poole chose Sally Hansen Miracle Gel in Red Eye, on shelves in July.) “I like when there’s asymmetry to a manicure,” she said.

4. Choose bright, comic book-esque shades for the ring, middle, and pointer fingers. (Here, she chose Sally Hansen Miracle Gel in Electri-Cute and Hard as Nails Xtreme Wear in Blue Me Away! and Mellow Yellow.) Layer on two coats.

5. Once the base coat is dry, draw a semicircle in a contrasting color from one edge of the nail bed three-quarters of the way to the other side—leaving space between your cuticle and the graphic shape. (In addition to the colors already in the rotation, Poole used Miracle Gel in Twiggy over the blue on our model’s middle finger.)

6. Repeat the same steps on the adjacent finger while you’re waiting for your semicircle to dry.

7. Add a second layer to each semicircle once they’ve had time to set.

8. Finish with a clear topcoat and clean up any excess polish around the nail bed with a makeup brush dipped in remover. Poole used the E.l.f. Essential Concealer Brush, which will only set you back $1.

While you wait for McCartney’s Resort pieces to hit stores, consider this manicure an instant form of gratification.

Look Good Naked: The Stella McCartney Manicure

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nailsManicurist Madeline Poole was on hand backstage at Stella McCartney to paint models’ nails with a flesh-colored polish—a task that seems quite simple, but is in fact rather challenging considering that nude does not in fact equate to light beige (a point Christian Louboutin and Clinique recently underscored with collections of shoes and makeup). Choosing a nail lacquer is similar to selecting a foundation in that you need to consider both the opacity and the color, Poole explained. Based upon the state of your nails, you may want to prep with a primer (an opaque formula) and layer it with a “tinted moisturizer” of sorts (a sheer pink). Poole coated fingertips with unique combinations of Sally Hansen Complete Salon Manicure in Cafe Au Lait, Nude Now, Shell We Dance, and Shore Enough according to each girl’s skin tone. And at $8 a bottle, you can afford to experiment and find your perfect match.

Putting on the Glitz, Backstage at Rodarte

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rodarteGlitter, butterflies, and Star Wars—that’s what little girls are made of, at least in the minds of Kate and Laura Mulleavy. There was certainly no shortage of sparkle backstage, as makeup artist James Kaliardos channeled “childhood remembrances of beauty before grunge ruined them,” he explained. And what child of the eighties wouldn’t want glitter lipstick? I’m not talking a delicate sprinkling of sparkle—Kaliardos went to town mixing the fine, shimmery particles with two shades of NARS lipstick: Deborah Audacious (a brown-berry) and Dominique Audacious (a mauve-y pink). Complexions were perfected with full-on foundation, concealer, and powder, while the contours of the face were dusted with a luminescent blush (dubbed Unlawful) and layered with the Matte Multiple in Anguilla. The eyes were as over-the-top as models’ mouths, with the reddish brown side of the forthcoming Dolomites Duo used on the lower rim, over the lid, and up into the brows. The adjacent lavender shadow was dusted on the center and inner corners before mascara was applied to the top lashes only. The resulting cloud of color was how Kaliardos imagined Cinderella would have worn her eye makeup—except she would have chosen pale blue.

The hair—especially on catwalker Chloe Nørgaard, whose rainbow color is as spectacular as a My Little Pony—was equally as dreamy. Odile Gilbert added in extensions for length that could rival Rapunzel’s, before spritzing strands with John Frieda leave-in conditioner and creating two braids. “It’s not a question of being thick, it’s a question of being long,” she explained. After letting the plaits set, she unraveled them to reveal mermaidlike waves before making a side part, twisting one side back, and pinning it in place with a butterfly-adorned barrette. Nails also got the princess treatment—receiving a layer of Sally Hansen lacquer in Pink Dream, an iridescent glitter available in September. If the designers are looking for someone to play dress-up with, I’m ready, willing, and available.

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde; Indigitalimages.com

Untouched Beauty, Backstage at Prabal Gurung

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prabal-beautyThe inspiration for Prabal Gurung’s collection started in Mustang, a “secluded kingdom” high in the Himalayas in Nepal where the designer went trekking during a visit home. “What I really loved about the whole place was the incredible colors and incredible way of dressing—it’s almost like sportswear, because they have to layer everything,” he explained. The spirit of Gurung’s woman, however, remains the same season after season, no matter where his travels take him: “It’s a femininity with bite,” he said. For Fall 2014 he moved away from the formaldehyde-dipped strands and neo-pastel pouts created for Spring, and opted for “great skin,” “beautiful hair,” and “tactile clothes.” That element of strength key to his aesthetic comes courtesy of “natural femininity and natural beauty.”

Makeup artist Diane Kendal kept with the spirit of the clothes by using MAC Cosmetics Face and Body foundation to even models complexions, forgoing powder to create a dewy finish. Just the apples were flushed with a ruddy-colored cream blush, and Pro Sculpting Cream in Accentuate was dabbed along the tops of the cheekbones and across the center of the lids to highlight. Eye Kohl in Fascinating (a white pencil) was used on the lower waterlines to brighten, while Pro Sculpting Cream in Coffee Walnut was used to contour the crease and hollows of the cheeks. Brows were brushed up, filled in with a corresponding shadow (like Omega, Bark, or Concrete) and set with wax for a “bushy” finish. To tone down any redness in the lips, Kendal applied a touch of foundation to models’ mouths.

Manicurist Jin Soon also focused on simplicity, using two of the three forthcoming Sally Hansen nail lacquers in the designer’s limited-edition polish line out in September: Himalaya (a nude) and Rupee Red (a bold burgundy). The majority of girls received clean, sand-colored paint jobs, while five had a straight, vertical line drawn down the pointer, middle, and ring fingers.

Directing my attention to the designer’s mood board at the hair and makeup test, mane master Paul Halon pointed out a photo of a Nepalese woman with straight, glossy, center-parted strands—his jumping off point for the style. To re-create it for the modern, urban consumer, he used Chi Volume Booster at the roots “to give hair guts” and applied Silk Infusion to the ends before blowing everything straight with a round brush. For movement, he pulled the length up into a loose bun, spritzed it with Infra Texture Hair Spray, heated the makeshift knot using a diffuser, and finally blasted it with a shot of cold air. “When you undo it you get a little kink, but I don’t want to use a tong because it [starts to] look cosmetic very quickly,” he said. The hair was then topped off with a silver chokerlike necklace designed by Gurung, or pulled back into a low ponytail with a black band. “When they walk, it’s very light, very airy,” he said of the final result—almost like a brisk mountain breeze was blowing down the catwalk.

Wild Child Meets Rock of Ages at Rodarte

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Rodarte

Mountains of mousse, teased hair, and side swoops are back—at least at Rodarte. Odile Gilbert said there was an “eighties intention” behind the look—which was evident by the inflated “bangs” that peaked over the brow and framed the face—as well as Debbie Harry of Blondie, who often sported a deep side part and a swoosh across the top. Gilbert created the look by dousing hair with John Frieda Frizz-Ease Curl Reviver Styling Mousse and blow-drying with a round brush to build body. She used a curling iron to set the flip, and added a slight wave to the length. For additional lift, a Mason Pearson bristle brush was used to back-comb the front section. The hair was then swung over the right shoulder, and a coiled cornrow was hidden near the nape of the neck, acting as a pincushion for the hand-painted extension that was added over the top. While we’ve seen printed looks from Gilbert in the past—like the cheetah-spotted bouffant she created at Jean Paul Gaultier Couture for Fall 2013—for this show she developed a pattern that she described as tweed meets zebra, meant to reflect fabrics used in the collection. After the extension that often contrasted the models’ hair color was secured, the length was conspicuously pinned to one side and shellacked (just as it was in the decade in which the style originated) with loads of Frizz-Ease Moisture Barrier Firm-Hold Hair Spray.

The nails were a different animal altogether (literally): with tortoiseshell patterns painted with a cosmetic sponge by manicurist Tracylee Percival. She first stamped two coats of Sally Hansen Complete Salon Manicure in Clay, a burnt orange, and accented it with patches of Cinnamon, a darker brown, for depth. (Both lacquers were made for yet another collaboration with the Mulleavy sisters, available in March.)

The inspiration for face painter James Kaliardos was a “wild L.A. girl—the real Los Angeles, not the red-carpet kind,” which he brought to life by applying NARS Larger Than Life Eyeliner in Via Veneto in an exaggerated V shape (for models with lids that touched the lash line, he implored Black Valley Eye Paint and an angled brush). Lashes were coated with Larger Than Life Lengthening Mascara, and arches were brushed up with Oural Brow Gel to give them an untamed and “animal-like” quality. To lift the eye and make it more graphic, Kaliardos applied a dot of Radiant Creamy Concealer underneath the eye that was paler than each model’s skin, which he said reminded him of either a leopard or Veruschka. The Matte Multiples in Altai and Anguilla (out spring 2014) were blended onto cheeks for color and contour. And the pinky-nude lip color was a combination of two Satin Lip Pencils in Biscayne Park and Floralies. Between the hair, manicures, and makeup, it was like a high-fashion zoo backstage.

Photos: Ivan Lattuada / Indigitalimages.com