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2 posts tagged "Tallulah Harlech"

Pretty in Punk, Backstage At Topshop Unique

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Topshop Unique’s girl is effortlessly cool and understatedly chic—a profile that was made infinitely clear with a quick peruse of the show’s front row. Next to Elle Fanning sat Leigh Lezark, who was a stone’s throw away from Poppy Delevingne, Pixie Geldof, Tallulah Harlech, and Olivia Palermo. “She’s the girl that everyone wants to be,” hairstylist Anthony Turner confirmed backstage, where the It-ness of it all was reinforced with a gaggle of the season’s biggest catwalkers. Cara, Jourdan, et al. got Turner’s low side parts, which were tucked behind the ears and treated with L’Oréal Beach Frizz for a shine-free, matte texture. “It’s the day after the night before,” he explained, throwing in a “nineties Kate Moss” reference as well as the words “very cool” to describe strands, thus completing the season’s hair inspiration trifecta. As models lined up before the show, Turner roughed up the hairline and broke up sections in the back, creating a randomness to the otherwise uniform coifs.

“It’s nineties grunge meets punk,” makeup artist Hannah Murray further elaborated, giving a “pretty edge” to designer Kate Phelan’s white and pale yellow palette. Mixing two Topshop Makeup Blushes in Prime Time and Flush, Murray made a makeshift, rosy eye shadow, which she dabbed with the silvery shade from its Eyeshadow Palette in Constellation to give lids a sheer iridescence. Cheeks were contoured using Topshop Lips in Beguiled, a vampish dark red that was layered with a dollop of its Balm for a dewy finish. To ensure the girls didn’t look “too done,” Murray took mouths down with a finger-patting of foundation while manicurist Anatole Rainey reprised Spring’s “nothing nail” with Topshop Nails in Nice & Neutral.

The Perfect Pour

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The flower fight broke out around 10 p.m. last night at New York’s The Hole gallery, where fashion and art stars had gathered to celebrate the opening of Holton Rower’s solo show. “It’s happening,” effused an elated Zani Gugelmann as she picked up a handful of freshly torn petals off the table and tossed them in the direction of Charlotte Ronson and Tallulah Harlech as Julian Schnabel looked on. Dinner was served in the middle of the gallery’s main show space, the walls of which have been lined with Rower’s large-scale “pour paintings” since his exhibition officially opened last weekend. “It’s the best-looking show we’ve done,” Hole director Kathy Grayson said of the multicolored boards created by different cups of plastic paint that are poured into one another, thus “pushing” the previous color outward, according to Rower, who has used up to 50 gallons of plastic artist paint in up to 500 different colors to create some of his bigger pieces.



“The thing about this, it’s not just the surface, it’s about material, it’s about body. You could just paint that painting,” Rower said, motioning to a 16-by-16-foot wall hanging. “But the fact that it’s physical, that the paint was pushed around obstacles…it’s like the paint is fighting,” he continued of the amorphous shapes that his custom-mixed pigments take on when they move around purposefully positioned platforms—or, as was the case last night, bottles of Dior nail polish. To coincide with the 50th anniversary of its Vernis—which was the first-ever line of designer lacquer when it launched in 1962—Dior Beauty sponsored the evening and gave Rower five different varnish shades, which inspired Hole creative director Fabiola Beracasa’s super-pro nail designs and the final colors the artist added to the live pour piece he created after dinner, including the iconic Rouge Altesse No. 999, a fiery red, and Gris Montaigne No. 707, a steely slate. “In your gift bags, you have these five colors,” he told a fawning crown before doing a little fawning himself. “Oooh, pretty,” he cooed as he poured. We couldn’t have said it better ourselves.