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115 posts tagged "Tom Pecheux"

Tom Pecheux’s Lips Are Sealed No Longer

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kiss-collage

Tom Pecheux, backstage fixture and creative makeup director for Estée Lauder, could hardly contain his excitement last season at Anthony Vaccarello when he described the packaging that was in the works for a mysterious new line of lipsticks. He discreetly referred to the more architectural look and magnetic closures, but considering these types of secrets are strictly confidential in the corporate beauty world, that’s all he could share…until now. The cosmetics giant is launching twenty shades of Pure Color Envy Sculpting Lipstick, a formula that boasts time-released hyaluronic acid and multifaceted pigments (available February 24 at esteelauder.com). In this exclusive, the pro reveals all—including the shades he hand-selected to suit the many model faces of the brand.

How would you describe the new Pure Color Envy collection?
When I look at the collection, the first thing I think is the packaging is absolutely divine. Richard Ferretti did an amazing job with the case. For me, twenty colors is the perfect amount. The range captures every woman’s desire. The shades and formula are [traditional] in that they have the high coverage you expect from a lipstick and include a pure red and a perfect nude, but the new technology gives the line a modern twist. It’s like a classic wool dress that is made in cashmere. The new texture and formula make Envy extremely luxurious.

What are your favorite shades in the collection?
As a makeup artist, I cannot limit myself to one favorite shade. It will be the one that fits the person that I am working with on that day.

What do you think a lipstick says about a woman?
Lipstick tells us so many things about a woman. It tells us about her personality. For example, a woman wearing a strong lipstick—bright red—suggests she wants to express a certain power.

What is the best way to apply lip color? Fingertips, brush, or straight from the bullet?
There is no recipe. It depends on the result you want to create. A bullet is the best application because it’s fast, precise, and gives nice coverage. Fingertips create a transparent finish with no precision—more like a stain. A brush is for when you want perfection and a high-quality finish, particularly when you apply a red lipstick.

What are your tricks for making lips appear fuller? Does lip liner help?
Lip liner can help, but for me, a liner only works if it’s a nude or a color that matches the color of the lip. To make them fuller, you can go slightly outside the lip line.

If you have small lips, avoid a dark shade. The darker the shade, the more intense your lips look, but on smaller lips it can give you a mean, severe look. Also avoid very pale lipsticks if you want a fuller-looking mouth.

What is your favorite lip look?
It depends on the woman. But I am totally in love with red as much as I am with nude. I love women who play with makeup to emphasize a quality of their personality or character. That’s why in terms of lipstick, I love colors that have something to say—so either a pale nude, a true red, a dark plum, or a bright color. When it comes to a gentle pink, I understand why women want to wear it, but as a makeup artist, it doesn’t reflect a personality so well.

Which shade in the collection would you choose for each of these Estée Lauder spokesmodels?

Carolyn Murphy:
Envious. She loves a red lipstick.

Constance Jablonski:
I love it when she focuses on her eyes, so a nude color like Insatiable Ivory works on her lips.

Joan Smalls:
I love her in a dark burgundy like Insolent Plum.

Liu Wen: I would go more pink, [one that's] powerful and dynamic. A shade like Dominant would suit.

Arizona Muse:
I love her in a red as well, so Vengeful Red.

What do you think makes a woman enviable?
Self-confidence.

I think Carolyn Murphy pretty much embodies that—gotta love a bad bitch on a bike who knows how to make a serious statement by slicking on some lipstick and revving up her engine.

Two Worlds Collide, Backstage at Ralph Lauren

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“It’s a downtown kind of girl for Polo,” Guido Palau noted of the womenswear line the designer debuted on today’s runway (behind the scenes the label’s latest fragrance, Midnight Romance, was also unveiled). To create hair that was as laid-back and cool as a bomber jacket or leather leggings, Palau prepped strands with Redken Pillow Proof primer and let them air-dry to enhance models’ natural waves. He followed that up with a dry shampoo for additional body and texture. For the classic Ralph Lauren portion of the show, he crafted a sophisticated pony. Satinwear 02 lotion was used before blow-drying for smoothness, after which the length was raked back into an “easy” tail and tied off with an elastic. To conceal the band, he wrapped a small section of hair around the base.

Before heading off to lunch at Basta Pasta, Tom Pecheux’s post-New York fashion week indulgence, he revisited the look he did for pre-fall. Pecheux began by evening the complexion with foundation, softly contouring the sides of the face with cream bronzer, and dabbing a pearly highlighter on the tops of cheekbones and lids. On the apples, he patted a combination of rose and apricot blushes. “You have to mix a lot of things to make it believable—nobody has pink cheeks,” he explained. As for why he taps his brush instead of swiping: “If you push it in, the [color] becomes one with the skin, [otherwise] it just sits on top.” The top lashes were coated with the black side of Estée Lauder’s Sumptuous Two Tone Mascara to “lift” the eye, while brown was used on the bottom for contrast. Yes, the designer revealed a new (and significantly more youthful) collection, but if the beauty look ain’t broke…

Photos: Getty

It’s Easy Being Green…If You’re Tom Pecheux

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Makeup artist Tom Pecheux “believes in green” this season. And it all started with a velvet chair (shown here) posted by fellow face painter Gucci Westman. He used various iterations of the shade at multiple shows already—including Peter Som, Altuzarra, and Derek Lam. At Som it was an olive green (MAC’s Cream Colour Base in Au Nature). “This eyeshadow is so disgusting, but I love it,” he said. The same went for the lipstick in Siss, a yellow-based nude: “I call it like a bird poo color, but if you look at the two [products] together, how chic is that?” He rimmed the eyes with a peacock green liner pencil before blurring it with gloss to lend a lived-in look to the makeup (similar to the sixties-inspired hair created by Eugene Souleiman, which Pecheux described as a “perfect hairdo” that a girl has slept on for a week). At Altuzarra, he sprinkled glitter with green undertones on models’ lids, and for Lam he created a green-gray hue that was “organic” but “intense.” Pecheux proclaimed green the new black in a message to Westman on Instagram, but now he’s making his flippant comment a serious statement for Fall 2014.

Smoke Show, Backstage at Derek Lam

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“As you can see it’s kind of a raccoon eye,” makeup artist Tom Pecheux joked. “It’s very big and smoky.” To get the look, he applied a heavy dose of translucent powder to lids before coating them and the lower lash lines with a combination of two shadows—Estée Lauder Pure Color Eyeshadow in Ivy Envy (a forest green) and the “petrol blue” shade from a trio dubbed Camo Chrome—using a big, fluffy brush. The rest of the face was kept bare to keep the focus on the “lake” of color that wrapped around models’ eyes.

Hair pro Orlando Pita channeled the “multi-ethnic, indigenous tribes” that served as the designer’s inspiration via a strong center part. To translate the concept to the modern, urban woman, Pita began by boosting body—blowing it out after applying Phyto Phytovolume Actif Volumizing Spray and creating a wave from the ears down with the T3 BodyWaver iron. Next, he polished the top half using a mix of Glossing Cream and Strong Sculpting Gel. “Combining the two keeps it soft but still gives you the hold you want,” he explained before pulling strands back into a tight, low ponytail and wrapping the base with elastic. For a “bulbous” finish, he laced the tail with a Mason Pearson brush—a happy accident that occurred during the test. “My focus is never for people to try to do it at home—I could care less—but this is something one could attempt,” Pita noted of his creation. “You’re never going to get it to look as good as this, but that’s why we still have jobs.”

Starry Eyed, Backstage at Altuzarra

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altuzarra-cropWhere makeup artist Tom Pecheux started is not where he wound up at Altuzarra. Inspired by the double-faced cashmere in the collection, his first instinct was to create a dual-colored eye. “It looked so uptown…a little bit tight-ass,” he said of the initial attempt. To loosen things up, he reached for a pot of MAC 3D Glitter in Brass Gold (a metallic with a green undertone) that was sitting on the table at the test, and the look suddenly fell into place. Or as the designer’s mother, Karen Altuzarra, quipped, “It was dumb luck.” To give the glitter something to grip onto, he prepped lids with concealer or foundation. Next, he coated a thin brush with Homeoplasmine before dipping it into the sparkles and running them along the upper lashes like liner. For a diffused effect, Pecheux used a dry, fluffy brush to pat more shimmery particles lightly up toward the brow bone. The rest of the face was kept neutral—including the lips, which were layered with a pink (Myself) and beige (Siss) hue to create the perfect flesh tone. And just before the models took to the runway, Pecheux placed lipstick in Good Kisser (a vivid fuchsia) messily into the crease of six models’ eyes. “We need to show luxury, but we have to be playful,” the face painter noted.

“Here is ballerina, here is madame, and here you don’t think,” hair pro Odile Gilbert said in regards to the placement of the textured chignons that rested squarely at the back of the head. She used nothing but her fingers to scrape strands back before coiling the length and securing it with “just three or four pins.” The finished product was meant to mimic how Kate Moss would craft her own bun. And honestly, who wouldn’t want to DIY that?

Photo: Sonny Vandevelde, Indigitalimages.com