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July 30 2014

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22 posts tagged "Wella"

“Stella Girls” Congregate En Masse For Spring

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We arrived at Place de l’Opéra for Stella McCartney’s Spring show just in time to catch the designer backstage as she settled into a makeup chair for a quick touch-up before the presentation got underway. “Make sure you tell them what you want so they don’t go all BBC on you,” McCartney’s longtime face-painter, Pat McGrath, shouted in jest, alluding to the designer’s classic no-makeup makeup look that is reinterpreted onto every model that walks in her show. “She’s just beautiful, fresh, glow-y, and gorgeous,” McGrath said of the quintessential Stella girl, for which she diffused CoverGirl TRUblend liquid foundation in one shade darker than each complexion to warm up faces before blending CoverGirl & Olay Simply Ageless Sculpting Blush in Lush Berry onto cheeks for a slight pink flush. Of course, something so sheer and pared-down requires a perfected canvas to start with. “It’s all about your skincare,” McGrath explained of the kind of proper conditioning that’s necessary to make this sort of look work. “Cleanse, tone, moisturize—that’s our thing,” she continued, name-dropping CoverGirl & Olay Simply Ageless Serum Primer and Dr. Orentreich’s oil-free moisturizer as great ways to create a flawless, dewy base.

Hairstylist Eugene Souleiman also looked no further than McCartney herself to get inspiration for the high and tight chignons he crafted using Wella Velvet Amplifier style primer. “What can I say? It’s just Stella,” he said of the bun that he swept up at the crown, coiled, and pinned to hold. Breaking out a blush brush to go over a layer of hair spray he had spritzed onto the sides to create sleekness without any harsh lines, Souleiman used his fingertips to rake hair back from the hairline, manipulating slight groves along the surface. Simple as it all seemed, there was definitely a point of view to the style. “Get rid of that Alberta Ferretti stuff—it’s way too romantic,” Souleiman advised a member of his team to emphasize the “very chic, but slightly tougher and more masculine” message.

Photo: Luca Cannonieri / GoRunway.com

Backstage At Haider Ackermann, “Possessed,” “Disturbed,” And Utterly Gorgeous

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If you were even remotely into last season’s move toward masculine beauty—sculpted skin, quiffs, et al—then the hair and makeup look at Haider Ackermann this morning definitely struck a chord. “It’s very intense,” makeup artist Stephane Marais said of the greasy brown “present” eyes and contrasting facial contours he designed for the occasion. Referencing poetry—”but disturbed poets, and mostly men, like Lord Byron”—Marais lined lids with MAC Eye Pencil in Coffee just along the water line to thicken lashes before layering chocolate and lavender shades of MAC Eye Shadow in Mulch, Concrete, and Shale through the crease, topping them with MAC Pro Mixing Medium Shine so the pigments appeared wet and glistening. Forgoing mascara, Marais blended a similarly toasted shade of MAC Cream Colour Base underneath cheekbones for definition before finally settling on the precisely right descriptor for the end result. “Possessed. That’s the word.”

While we happen to love a slick, smoldering, demonic eye, it was the hair that won us over. Prepping strands with Wella Create Character Spray Texturizer, Eugene Souleiman assigned himself the task of fashioning a faux fade—the second attempt we’ve seen at the gradually shaved on the side, long on the top style in two days—constructing a tight twisted chignon that wasn’t tucked in all the way at the top. Instead, mid-lengths and ends were left out, straight-ironed, and sprayed with Wella Stay Styled hair spray before being pinned down randomly to create spiky definition. It was an opportunity for the girls with typically long locks to live out that fantasy of going really short—which can be a particularly liberating experience, according to Catherine McNeil. “I did it in December and just got it trimmed,” McNeil said of recently making the cut with the chin-grazing crop she’s been sporting in Europe. “I’ve had the same hair forever,” she said. “It’s so much easier now.”

Photo: Luca Cannonieri / GoRunway.com

Spain On The Brain, Backstage At Missoni

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Angela Missoni may have been inspired by her daughters’ late night antics on the island of Sardinia for Spring, but her hair and makeup team looked a bit further west for their seasonal muse. “It’s sweaty, sexy flamenco skin with a focus on brows,” facepainter Lucia Pieroni said, creating a dewy base with MAC Face + Body Foundation and adding swipes of glistening highlights with her favorite new product, MAC Metal-X Cream Shadow in Fusion Gold, which she blended over cheekbones, down the bridge of the nose and onto the chin to mimic “hot, sweaty” skin. To create a touch of contour, Pieroni swiped its Paintpot in Groundwork, a medium taupe-y brown, underneath cheekbones and across lids for a warm smolder. Brows were built up using MAC Eyeshadow in Coquette and Copperplate and lips were given a finger-pressing of MAC Lipsticks in Freckletone and Fresh Brew for a worn-in, neutral effect. As a finishing touch, Pieroni spritzed each model with MAC Fix+ water mist before they head out onto the runway to hammer home the sense of a faux glow.


Wella global creative director added a similarly youthful, deconstructed element to “inject a rawness that would capture the passion and sensuality of a beautiful young Missoni woman at the end of a hot summer night.” Applying Wella Professionals Velvet Amplifier on wet strands, Souleiman hit hair with heat to create volume before “squashing” its Rugged Fix Matte Molding Crème into the roots for a matte texture. Then, after carving out deep side parts, Souleiman gathered the lengths into a ponytail that he only pulled through half way, pinning it against itself to create a loop that he spritzed with Wella Professionals Ocean Spritz Beach Texture Spray for a rough finish. “It’s a traditional, slick Spanish look that’s deconstructed and disheveled,” Souleiman said, sliding decorative, snake shaped combs into his haphazard chignons.

Photo: Luca Cannonieri / GoRunway.com

A Twofer, Backstage At Narciso Rodriguez

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Playing with tone rather than a range of different face colors has become one of the prevailing beauty trends to come out of the New York shows. The look backstage at Narciso Rodriguez provided yet another example of the technique’s versatility. “Intensely monochromatic” is how Shiseido artistic director Dick Page described the makeup, for which he played around with a single product: a mauve-y, prototype cream base. Page applied the pigment onto lids as well as underneath the lower lash line before blending it with Shiseido Shimmering Rouge Lipstick in Dragon, a soft red that was reduced to a warm nude when pressed onto pouts. As is customary at a Narciso show, brows were built up using Shiseido’s Shimmering Cream Eye Shadow, which Page insisted on applying himself. “No one else can be trusted!” he joked.

The makeup and Deborah Lippmann’s gray Waking Up in Vegas lacquer were purposely subdued to account for the large amount of color in the collection—and in the hair (kudos to Rodriguez for getting two of NYFW’s big beauty movements into one show). “We were looking at pictures of girls with streaks and I said, enough of that,” Wella global creative director Eugene Souleiman explained of the look, which included a conical twist with bright, matted-down sides coated with spray-on hair color and copious amounts of Wella Super Set finishing spray (“you get what you’d get with a gel in half the time,” Souleiman said of the product’s quick-dry, defining abilities). Going for something “modern and striking,” the coiffing star chose five different accent shades, including white, bright orange, neon green, turquoise, and yellow. If anything can shake up the cult of dip-dyeing, this just might be it.

Photo: Luca Cannonieri / GoRunway.com

One—Make That Two—For The Boys

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As previously noted, skirting the masculine/feminine divide was the lasting beauty impression at the Fall shows, with big, bushy brows and even makeshift sideburns turning up from New York to Paris. The trend was realized most visibly (and readily) through ubiquitous quiffs—free-flowing top sections of hair that were spiked up and combed back over slicked-back sides, and twisted-up back sections at shows like Rochas and Dolce & Gabbana. Runway only? Not hardly. Magazines are rushing to embrace the look, too, and this month alone we’ve spotted the backstage style made popular by Wella global creative director Eugene Souleiman, Redken creative consultant Guido Palau, and coiffing star Luke Hersheson on Laura Blokhina in Elle Denmark and on Kim Noorda in Vogue Taiwan. While Blokhina’s hair is already quite short, which made creating variance between voluminous and flat planes a relatively simple endeavor, hairstylist Marie Thomsen had her work cut out for her with Noorda’s mid-back-grazing strands. When working with longer locks, it’s essential to create a sharp part to separate the sides from the top and press generous amounts of styling wax, like Redken’s Structure Wax 17, into hair before fastening your twist in the back. Think of it like sporting 2009′s side-shave without the permanence of actually applying razor to scalp. What do you think of these gender-bending styles?

Photo: Ceen Wahren for Vogue Taiwan, May 2011; Sigurd Grunberger for Elle Denmark, May 2011