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July 31 2014

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6 posts tagged "Wrinkles"

Can Your Pillowcase Lead to Better Skin?

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There has been a lot of pillow talk recently, with fabric cases claiming to do everything from preventing fine lines to minimizing breakouts. But does a rectangular piece of cloth have the power to change your complexion? We asked New York City dermatologist Francesca Fusco if this trend is beauty magic or total B.S:

There are a handful of high-tech linens worth considering, noted Fusco. The most promising one is the Iluminage Skin Rejuvenating Pillowcase, which has support from a small study that demonstrated a decrease in the appearance of crow’s-feet after eight weeks of sleeping on a pillowcase that contains copper oxide, which “upregulates the secretion of extracurricular skin proteins,” she explained. Something like the BeautyZZZ Natural Silk Pillowcase takes the classic version to the next level with its chemical-free, hypoallergenic material. “It will diminish sleep lines as well as be gentle on sensitive-skin types,” Fusco said. “But make sure you wash it with hypoallergenic detergent, otherwise you defeat the purpose.” Then there are pillowcases geared toward breakouts, like the Nufabrx Pillowcase for Blemish Prone Skin, which has a blend of four essential oils in its weave. “Acne can be exacerbated by stress and the subsequent cortisol spikes—if aromatherapy helps diminish stress and subsequent acne, this pillowcase could be a good thing.”

The bottom line: Bonus points for sleeping on complexion-boosting blends, but laundering whatever fabric you put your face to each night on the reg is the real key to getting a flawless facade with your eyes closed.

Photo: Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

The Buzz On Bee Venom

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This column features weekly tips and advice from a revolving cast of industry leaders, on hand to discuss your beauty dilemmas, from blemishes to Botox. To submit a question, e-mail celia_ellenberg@fairchildfashion.com.

I’ve read a lot of articles recently about celebrities using bee venom creams to fight wrinkles without having to resort to surgery. Where does this ingredient come from, and does it work?

Bee venom (apitoxin) is produced in the abdomen of bees and it is a complex mixture of proteins. I have not seen any clinical data demonstrating [its] efficacy when used in topical formulations, [so] I will never prescribe or recommend [it] as I am very skeptical about ingredients with no efficacy data. This toxin does cause local inflammation, but there is not one clinical study confirming that bee venom is effective in erasing or reducing wrinkles.

Dr. Marko Lens is a consultant plastic and reconstructive surgeon and an internationally renowned expert in the field of skin cancer and skin aging. A fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons, Dr. Lens works out of his own private practice in London, where his extensive research into the process of skin aging led him to create Zelens, a range of advanced cosmeceuticals that utilize potent plant-derived ingredients spiked with biotechnological actives.

banish wrinkles and acne in one fell swoop

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This column features weekly tips and advice from a revolving cast of industry leaders, on hand to discuss your beauty dilemmas, from blemishes to Botox. The following query was culled from a private stock, but we’ll be accepting readers’ questions soon.

I’ve been noticing the early onset of wrinkles, but because I have “reactive” skin the antiaging creams on the market are too heavy and make me break out. I want to start a prevention regimen but don’t want to have to choose between acne and wrinkles. Do you have any product recommendations that will deal with both issues?

Moisturizing is essential because when the skin is dry, dead skin cells flake off and can contribute to clogged pores and acne. I recommend using an oil-free moisturizer such as the MD Skincare Hydra-Pure Oil-Free Moisture. The Hydra-Pure Chelating Complex in this product will help fight acne caused by impurities (specifically calcium and magnesium) deposited on the skin by tap water used to wash your face. The chelators also break down free radicals, which can lead to the visible signs of aging, and can also cause your skin’s own oil to become comedogenic and form waxy plugs, clogging pores and leading to breakouts.

A board-certified dermatologist and dermatological surgeon based in New York City, Dr. Dennis Gross founded his own skincare line, MD Skincare, as a topical alternative to surgical procedures. His products have consistently been featured in fashion and beauty consumer magazines and his expertise has helped him become a well-known lecturer and consultant on the subject of skincare. His book,Your Future Face: The Customized Plan to Look Younger at Any Age, focuses on a customized approach to individual problems.

Photo: George Marks/Retrofile/Getty Images

Dr. McDaniel Says A Filler Is Not Forever

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This column features weekly tips and advice from a revolving cast of industry leaders, on hand to discuss your beauty dilemmas, from blemishes to Botox. The following query was culled from a private stock, but we’ll be accepting readers’ questions soon.

I’m interested in exploring cosmetic fillers to smooth out the increasingly visible lines and wrinkles on my face, but am hesitant to spend the money because it seems like most of them only last for six months at most. Are there any fillers that don’t get reabsorbed into your skin, for a more permanent solution—and, more importantly, if this technology exists, is it safe?

Artefill is becoming more popular for this very reason. However, there are special issues when considering using permanent fillers, such as the cosmetic surgeon’s technique and experience, because if the filler is not placed properly the results are still “permanent.” Additionally, aging of the face is a dynamic process and what may look good initially may not be ideal for the long haul—even more so if facial plastic surgery is performed and the skin is significantly “rearranged” in the future. I prefer to use some of the longer-lasting fillers such as Juvederm and Restylane, and the newer Evolence is very promising.

With over 20 years of clinical experience in cosmetic laser surgery and dermatology research, David H. McDaniel, MD [http://www.lasercenterofvirginia.com/mcdanbio.html], is board-certified by the American Board of Dermatology, an assistant professor of clinical dermatology and plastic surgery at Eastern Virginia Medical School, and the director of the Institute of Anti-Aging Research. Dr. McDaniel is also a sought-after consultant for cosmetic and drug companies regarding skincare products and cosmeceuticals.

Photo: Peter Dazeley/Getty Images

Preventive Measures Now, No Wrinkles Later

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This column features weekly tips and advice from a revolving cast of industry leaders, on hand to discuss your beauty dilemmas, from blemishes to Botox. The following query was culled from a private stock, but we’ll be accepting readers’ questions soon.

I’ve heard that if you start Botox injections early as a preventive measure, you can actually train your facial muscles out of that pesky wrinkling habit. Is that true?

Yes, Botox may be used as a preventive measure to smooth wrinkles before they begin. As the facial muscles relax through Botox injections, the muscles in the forehead are trained to avoid creasing, which will prevent the formation of lines and wrinkles.

A board-certified member of the American Board of Internal Medicine and the American Board of Dermatology, Dr. Fredric Brandt has practices in both Miami and New York City and has established himself in the beauty world not just as a physician but as an artist, known for his innovations in helping patients sculpt a younger appearance with a variety of non-invasive procedures.