Style.com
Fall 2014 Ready-to-Wear

Fendi

Senior Beauty Editor Amber Kallor's take:
"It's about purity of line," hairstylist Sam McKnight explained of the sharp and minimal look he crafted at Fendi. "Karl sent me an illustration with a very small head." To keep strands compact, McKnight employed a lot of Sebastian hairspray and made two side partings on either side of the face, dividing the hair into two small sections near the crown. Next, he folded the sections over one another, tying each off into a ponytail with a piece of elastic. "It's like a basket weave or origami," he noted of his technique. Then the sides were scraped back to cover the elastic and gathered into a low pony, which was later wrapped with a piece of the tail to hide the band. While the style appeared seamless, it required "pins and grips" (which were pulled out after the hair was set into place) and at least two pros per model to create.

Playing off the linear elements in the hair, face painter Peter Philips opted for cinematic highlighting and shading over a "proper makeup statement." Seeing as the collection was filled with stark contrasts—tough fabrics and delicate orchids; fluffy furs and shiny, sleek jackets—he wanted to keep the look strong but simple, so as not to clash with or overtake the clothes. A full-coverage foundation was used to perfect complexions before it was powdered to a semi-matte finish. Then he applied a pure white Mehron CreamBlend Stick on the cheekbones. Philips said he tested out a pearly illuminator but found the result "too pretty," and these girls needed to be "tough." A taupe, matte pigment was run along the hollows of the cheeks, and eyes were given a graphic feel with a blend of two brown Make Up For Ever shadows (#17 and #165) just on the outer corners. Not wanting a cat-eye effect, Philips concentrated the color on "the spot between the socket and the eyeball," angling it downward, "like old photos of Marlene Dietrich or seventies Guy Bourdin makeup." Lips were topped off with transparent gloss. "It doesn't look natural, but 50 percent of the makeup will blend in with the light on the catwalk," he explained. And Philips was right. With drones buzzing overhead, the intense, almost-theatrical contours disappeared—all that remained were models' perfectly chiseled features as Cara Delevingne kicked off the show, a Lagerfeld-like Fendi bug daintily dangling between her thumb and forefinger.
Fall 2014 Ready-to-Wear Shows
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