Style.com
Spring 2014 Ready-to-Wear

Emilio Pucci

Senior Beauty Editor Amber Kallor's take:
Duran Duran, Madonna, and Daria Werbowy were all name-checked by hairstylist Luigi Murenu backstage at Emilio Pucci. So what exactly do an eighties English rock band, the Queen of Pop, and a supermodel have in common? At one point or another, they've all sported the pushed-over look he re-created for the catwalk here. Not only does a swoop over one eye provide instant "cool girl" status, Murenu elaborated, but it also builds volume without having to fire up a blow-dryer. For additional lift, he spritzed Kérastase Lift Vertige on roots and worked Mousse Bouffante through dry strands for texture. He used a one-inch curling iron to add a slight bend, wrapping sections from the ear down around the barrel. Hair spray was misted all over to set, while Vinyle Nutri-Sculpt cream coaxed out layers and created a piece-y finish.

"We have a definite image for the Pucci girl that we've been developing over the past four or five seasons," said face painter Lisa Butler. "The makeup is very secondary to this whole process." She went on to explain that the house's creative director, Peter Dundas, doesn't love foundation or color on the face, but Butler managed to use plenty of both in a nearly undetectable way. To inject drama and dimension minus eyeliner, lashes, or lipstick, she added depth to the skin by mixing a foundation that matched each model's skin tone with the deepest bitter chocolate shade MAC carries in its Face and Body line. It's a technique she's often employed on shoots but hasn't brought to the runway until now. "When you see girls [in photos] and they look grubby and mean, this is why—it makes them [appear] more moody," Butler explained—an effect an orange-brown bronzer couldn't possibly produce. A blend of Cultivating Chic and March Mist shadows (beige and gray shades from the MAC Spring '14 Trend Forecast Eye Palette) was applied to the lids, up through the brows, and along the lower lash lines with a fluffy brush. The same combo (with a higher ratio of beige to gray) was dusted under the cheekbones to act as a contour. Butler squiggled brow pencil on the corners of arches and took the edge off with a bit of blending to make them appear "fluffier," then used the same pencil to lightly dot freckles over the bridge of the nose and under the eyes. In the Mode (a taupe hue) was applied to take down redness in the lips, and New Groove (a wine) was pushed into the inner rim of the mouth (both colors in the Spring '14 Trend Forecast Lip Palette). The finished product was a "groomed but not done" tough girl—an aesthetic that lent itself perfectly to the slick leather, athletic mesh, and heavyweight-champion-worthy boxing belts seen on the runway.
Spring 2014 Ready-to-Wear Shows
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