"Prostitution" was the theme for what Arkadius described as his most salable collection to date. "This is a reaction to those who attack designers because they create commercial clothes," said Arkadius, proudly wearing a jacket stamped with call-girl ads. "Are designers prostitutes when we meet people halfway?"

Arkadius did show less extravagant clothes than usual, including net tops and plenty of sensible skirts and jackets with flattering button trims. "Until my dream of streets that look like catwalks comes true," said Arkadius, "designers have to find a way to survive." But no one need worry that the Polish-born designer will be competing with the Gap anytime soon; his presentation still featured plenty of independent-minded verve. Loose pinstripe pants were worn with a sleeveless knit top that looked as if it were about to disintegrate; sheepskin dresses, muskrat corsets and head-trapping balloons shouldn't be turning up in corporate boardrooms anytime soon.