You will not be wearing Boudicca's clothing to the grocery store, to work or even to a nightclub. As a matter of fact, unless you're the guest of honor at a museum reception for an exhibition on deconstruction and architecture, it's unlikely that you will find much use at all for a striped pantsuit with tie sashes across the legs and breasts, or an enormous, stiff leather corset with positively dangerous edges.

Of course, fashion is not just about cashmere twin sets—and, to be fair, Boudicca did show several wearable looks, like a belted cream Kimono coat worn over culottes, an aged leather coat with paneled insets and several beautifully draped dresses with gold straps. Still, at a moment when even the most intellectual fashion seems to be moving away from angst-ridden conceptualism, Boudicca's dramatic clothes, however beautiful they may be, look at times as if they were behind and not ahead of the times.