Gone were all of Spring's campy, sugar-coated references to the clubby '80s at Marc Jacobs. In their stead, Jacobs went for quirkily tailored clothes that gently touched upon—and promptly subverted—fashion's recurring ladylike motifs with playful details and an unforced spirit of innocence.

With a knowing wink to Patrick Kelly, that other famous American Francophile, Jacobs gave a lively twist to his boiled-twill suits, silk jackets, and cashmere coats using oversized, childlike buttons. The effect was that of a young girl trying on her older sister's clothes, yet somehow making them all her own. Colorful trompe l'oeil lapels, ribbons, collars, and trims on simple georgette tops and dresses all added to the general feeling of naive elegance. With bunny-and-flower-print dresses and a stunning yellow mohair and sequin coat, Jacobs provided welcome relief from the self-consciously glammed-up evening looks that dominate most runways.